Learning the Command Line – Editing files

Terminal — nano — test1-1

In this session we are going to learn one way of editing text files in Terminal. Back in the day there was pico. This was the editor part of the Pine mail program used in *nix. It was a very simple plain text editor used to create mail and text files. There are other editors such as vi, vim and emacs but those can get complicated and very powerful; these aren’t really needed to create or edit a simple text file. Fast forward to today, we now have nano, the …

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Learning the Command Line – File Permissions

Ever have a file you can’t do anything with? Can’t change it, can’t delete it, can’t even look at it? We’re going to find out why. FreeBSD, and by extension, OS X (which is loosely based on FreeBSD), uses file permissions. This lets the system control access to files and directories by different users. Would you want another user looking at your files? Of course not. Permissions determine who can access any file or directory and whether it can be edited or deleted. There are three types of access for …

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Learning the Command Line – File System

snow

Last time we learned how to list files, now let’s see where those files are. All your files reside on your hard drive, either internal, external or SSD. These drives have files and folders scattered throughout the drive but most are in certain places and are required for the system to function. Moving or deleting certain files or folders can cause your system to malfunction or even not boot. Best practice is if you don’t know what it is, leave it. The beginning of your drive, called the root, is …

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Learning the Command Line – Listing Files

Terminal_—_bash-ls-1

This is the second article in the command line series. The first article by vansmith can be found here: http://www.mac-forums.com/blog/learning-the-command-line-part-one/ This time we will be discussing file management commands. Some of these commands might look strange to you. That’s because most Terminal commands have the vowels and sometimes consonants removed to make the command shorter. For instance the copy command is cp with the o and y removed. Obligatory warning: Please be careful when working on the command line. Most commands will not ask you “Are You Sure?” like a …

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Putting Your Apps on a Diet

The fat man's diet has been a success!

Given that hard drive size is rarely a concern anymore, developers seem to make an assumption that space is no longer a issue. Despite this, a common complaint in forum posts is a lack of hard drive space. Although the following tip won’t solve all space issues, it can be a valuable part of the process of conserving and freeing up space if needed. Application Structure Applications for OS X are commonly distributed as application bundles which, to be fairly blunt, are little more than glorified folders containing the application binary and required …

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