Ultimate Source?

Joined
Nov 24, 2014
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Points
1
If I could master this website, I wouldn't need your help. I especially enjoy the frequent "reminders" about the attributes of a good post or question. So, I am asking "What sites or resources would you suggest that will help an aged parent progressively improve his use of an iMac? To play golf or basketball or be a lawyer there are skills and information that must be learned and mastered so that one can improve. Is there such a protocol for learning how to use an iMac? Or is there a place on this site where people new to Macs can ask the not so well formed question and have the Masters who frequent the forums help the struggling student formulate a better question? Or is my best resource " Macs for the Doddering Dimwit" at my local news stand?
 
C

chas_m

Guest
It's hard to answer the question because different people have different levels of understanding of computers generally. As for where to ask "dumb" questions about Apple devices or software on THIS forum, you've found the spot -- Switcher Hangout (read the description!).

As for learning Macs generally, we usually suggest a few of the MANY resources available. Among the top suggestions are to take advantage of "One on One" at your local Apple Store if there's one within an hour of your location. Another resource is your local Mac User Group, which you can usually find out about by checking your local "Coffee News" or librarian or the Internet. There's tons of sites like My First Mac that are designed to be helpful, books for readers and visual learners, but speaking for myself I learned a lot about Macs by reading the magazine tutorials on sites like MacWorld, saying "that sounds interesting, let's try it" and following the directions.

For the iPad and iPhone, there are some really great free e-books provided by Apple in the iBookstore.
 

pigoo3

Well-known member
Staff member
Admin
Joined
May 20, 2008
Messages
44,208
Reaction score
1,411
Points
113
Location
U.S.
Your Mac's Specs
2017 15" MBP, 16gig ram, 1TB SSD, OS 10.15
So, I am asking "What sites or resources would you suggest that will help an aged parent progressively improve his use of an iMac?

Things usually work best when you ask specific questions.

If you didn't know how to spell words...giving you the Unabridged Oxford English Dictionary wouldn't be much help!;)

But yes...as you mentioned. If you are just looking for a general "How To" source of information...one of those "Mac's For Dummies" books is a great place to start. Then come here with specific questions as they pop up.:)

To play golf or basketball or be a lawyer there are skills and information that must be learned and mastered so that one can improve.

As far as the golf or basketball analogies. Ehh...not so great.;) You can read all day long how to play golf or basketball. But when it really comes right down to it...you got to actually play golf or basketball...find out your weak points...and correct them via additional practice/playing.

The Mac OS (or any computing OS) is sort of the same way. You got to actually use it...figure out the areas you are confused about...then ask specific questions. This is why I said above...internet forums work best when specific questions are asked (and then answers given).:)

- Nick
 
Last edited:
OP
R
Joined
Nov 24, 2014
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Pigoo3

Actually, giving someone a dictionary to find a definition or an answer to his question works quite well if he does not know the correct spelling of a word. He gets close to the word by sounding it out and then finds the word and gets much more complete and accurate information than he had. If the person is illiterate, of course, a dictionary will not help, unless it has pictures. Usually, one learns "how" to use a dictionary before he is expected to use it.

As far as basketball or any sport, have you ever seen a kid play a sport without learning fundamentals? It is a pretty ragged experience.

Yes, it is best to ask specific questions. Probably the more specific questions are asked by those who are more knowledgable about a topic. Of course, their questions are easier to answer.

Your posting is fun, but my concerns and questions are not addressed. It seems to me that this site is for the clear headed and focused not for the confused and struggling, such as myself. Thank you for your response to my concerns.
 
Joined
Mar 24, 2008
Messages
480
Reaction score
21
Points
18
If I could master this website, I wouldn't need your help.
This website is just another forum site. Just like forum sites for stuff like golf and basketball and law. There's no mastery. You pick a subforum that you're interested in and browse.

I especially enjoy the frequent "reminders" about the attributes of a good post or question.
I have absolutely no idea what this means.

So, I am asking "What sites or resources would you suggest that will help an aged parent progressively improve his use of an iMac?

That depends on what shortcomings you currently perceive yourself having. If you literally do not know how to use a mouse, a basic computer class at your local community college may be in order. They have discounts for senior citizens usually. If you have used it a while and want to get into more advanced areas, it's typically something to Google. There is a point where resources get extremely focused. Just as a lawyer starts out reading about very general law and refines into resources about their particular branch of law.

To play golf or basketball or be a lawyer there are skills and information that must be learned and mastered so that one can improve. Is there such a protocol for learning how to use an iMac?

I have no idea what the correlation is. Ya wanna email, ya email. Ya wanna browse, ya browse. Ya wanna be a system admin for a 1500 user Mac shop and do imaging and scripting and repairs and have people appreciate your hard work once in a while.. ya do that. *I* do that. The amount of study you do is directly proportional to how far you want to go.

Or is there a place on this site where people new to Macs can ask the not so well formed question and have the Masters who frequent the forums help the struggling student formulate a better question? Or is my best resource " Macs for the Doddering Dimwit" at my local news stand?

Switcher Hangout The place for switchers to discuss their new machines, and how to work with OS X. General support can be had here for newbie stuff, like "How do I restart my new iMac?" :)
It said this when you came in here. You don't need to ramble or insult yourself. You just need to read. Lawyers, basketball players, and golfers that read tend to get farther than those that do not.
 
Joined
Sep 3, 2010
Messages
622
Reaction score
13
Points
18
Location
Charlotte, NC
Your Mac's Specs
mid-2010 Mac Mini OS 10.12.6 Sierra, 2.66 GHz C2D, 8GB RAM, 30 in. Cinema Display
IMO, the best way to get the most from your Mac is to master the operating system running your Mac. Although we do not know many details about your iMac, we do know it has an operating system. Books such as this one below will take you step by step through the operating system explaining the how, where, and why's. Simply go through the book at your own pace and come to this forum for clarification of things you cannot quite grasp or something you may need a more detailed explanation.
My advice to you is to start with the Time Machine set up. Then, if you manage to screw things up, you wil not lose you files and stuff and you can go back in time to a place where your Mac was performing well.

YMM.gif
 

pigoo3

Well-known member
Staff member
Admin
Joined
May 20, 2008
Messages
44,208
Reaction score
1,411
Points
113
Location
U.S.
Your Mac's Specs
2017 15" MBP, 16gig ram, 1TB SSD, OS 10.15
Actually, giving someone a dictionary to find a definition or an answer to his question works quite well if he does not know the correct spelling of a word. He gets close to the word by sounding it out and then finds the word and gets much more complete and accurate information than he had. If the person is illiterate, of course, a dictionary will not help, unless it has pictures. Usually, one learns "how" to use a dictionary before he is expected to use it.

As far as basketball or any sport, have you ever seen a kid play a sport without learning fundamentals? It is a pretty ragged experience.

I could discuss/argue with you on these points…but it's really not worth it…since you will only want to see things your way anyhow…and not acknowledge positive points the other side has made!;)

Yes, it is best to ask specific questions. Probably the more specific questions are asked by those who are more knowledgable about a topic. Of course, their questions are easier to answer.

Do you REALLY think that you are the first person posting on this website that has been in the EXACT SAME POSITION as you??…hardly!!! I guarantee you 100% you know more that you give yourself credit for. :)

Let me give you another example about internet forums. You don't join an internet forum to learn how to do:

- brain surgery
- rebuild a automobile engine
- build a house
- etc.

If you want to do these things…you complete a college degree program, take an individual course, or read a book or books. If you have specific questions…very easy to join an internet forum…and ask questions (one or many).

I GUARANTEE you. The VAST majority of folks using this internet forum learned how to use the Mac OS via JUST USING IT…and asking specific questions!:)

Your posting is fun, but my concerns and questions are not addressed. It seems to me that this site is for the clear headed and focused not for the confused and struggling, such as myself. Thank you for your response to my concerns.

Yes your questions & concerns were addressed! But because there's a lot of concrete in your noggin!;)…you didn't see it!:)

I told you:

- if you have specific questions…ask them here!:)
- If you want to learn the Mac OS like attending a college course…then purchase something like a "Mac for Dummies" book!:)

AGAIN (as I mentioned above) The VAST majority of folks using this internet forum learned how to use the Mac OS via JUST USING IT…and asking specific questions!:)

The bottom line is…JUST USE THE Mac OS…and when you come across something that is confusing or were wondering if there was a way of doing something…just ask specific questions.:) Being argumentative will get you no where!:(

- Nick
 
M

MacInWin

Guest
rudy ratte said:

I especially enjoy the frequent "reminders" about the attributes of a good post or question.
and then S.SubZero said:

I have absolutely no idea what this means.
I think what rudy ratte was noting was the sig lines that a lot of us use to encourage people to read the excellent post on how to make a good post here. We do tire of posts like, "It doesn't work," that provide zero information, so most of us just put the link in our sig and let it post. Rudy is playing the dummy by not recognizing the sig for what it is.

Rudy, listen to the excellent advice you have been given--use the Mac to learn it. It's a bit like a bicycle, you can study all about it, but you've got to get on it to learn to ride it and benefit from it. Yes, it's rocky at first, but you get better with practice. And if you struggle with something specific, come back and post a specific question so we can help. But do read the link in my sig to see how to make that post work best, OK?
 
Joined
Jan 20, 2012
Messages
5,043
Reaction score
408
Points
83
Location
North Carolina
Your Mac's Specs
Air M2 ('22) OS 14.3; M3 iMac ('23) OS 14.3; iPad Pro; iPhone 14
If I could master this website, I wouldn't need your help. I especially enjoy the frequent "reminders" about the attributes of a good post or question. So, I am asking "What sites or resources would you suggest that will help an aged parent progressively improve his use of an iMac?.....................

Hi Rudy...... - First, welcome to the forum! :)

Second, I'm not going to get in the middle of this brouhaha - ;) But, please provide us w/ some basic information: 1) Mac model/year; 2) OS X installed; 3) Network in home or needed; and 4) Issues w/ hardware/software.

Plus, what has been your previous computer experience (PCs, Macs, other)? Answers to these questions might help us better understand your situation and provide more specific responses. Dave
 

pigoo3

Well-known member
Staff member
Admin
Joined
May 20, 2008
Messages
44,208
Reaction score
1,411
Points
113
Location
U.S.
Your Mac's Specs
2017 15" MBP, 16gig ram, 1TB SSD, OS 10.15
It's a bit like a bicycle, you can study all about it, but you've got to get on it to learn to ride it and benefit from it. Yes, it's rocky at first, but you get better with practice.

Great example/analogy!:) With many things…you just got to do it!;)

- Nick
 

Shop Amazon


Shop for your Apple, Mac, iPhone and other computer products on Amazon.
We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon and affiliated sites.
Top