Security Update installed on Mavericks

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I have just received a notification that a security update has been installed on my MacBook Pro running 10.9.5.
Is there anywhere I can check to identify what was updated. I have looked in Software Update and it is not logged in the last 30 days' updates.
Jonathan
 
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I have had the same notification. It has the same icon as the security and privacy system prefs pane. I also can't find any mention in recent software updates and have looked in theconsole logs and cant find any clues
 

chscag

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It was a "Network Time Protocol Service" security update which Apple designated as critical and effects all users.
 

IWT


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Thanks for the clarification. I always like to keep abreast of what is being installed, as I never trust “them out there"!!
Regards,
Jonathan
 
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chas_m

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Normally (and this is how it was in my case, since I did it on the first day), such an update would be presented in Software Update for you to install.

In this case -- and for the first time I'm aware of -- the next day, Apple decided this problem was so critical that it HAD TO BE patched. They've had similar issues with Flash and Java, but in those cases they had the option of remotely disabling them, which they did. This effectively forced users to either keep those items up-to-date or don't use them, and has worked well as far as I can tell.

This time, that option wasn't available so the patch was "pushed" onto eligible machines, since it did not require a restart. Because this vulnerability represented an "imminent threat" of severe attack, and because it is a crucial function to the rest of the system, I think Apple was well within reason to choose the "push" option. I wouldn't want them to do that for anything less than a grave threat, but I'm glad they chose to do it in this case, as it will save a lot of grief and protect users.

As with the remote "kill switch" ability Apple has (again, strictly for protecting users from remote invasions), Apple is extremely hesitant to use the ability -- but it needs to be there for safety.
 

IWT


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Normally (and this is how it was in my case, since I did it on the first day), such an update would be presented in Software Update for you to install.

In this case -- and for the first time I'm aware of -- the next day, Apple decided this problem was so critical that it HAD TO BE patched. They've had similar issues with Flash and Java, but in those cases they had the option of remotely disabling them, which they did. This effectively forced users to either keep those items up-to-date or don't use them, and has worked well as far as I can tell.

This time, that option wasn't available so the patch was "pushed" onto eligible machines, since it did not require a restart. Because this vulnerability represented an "imminent threat" of severe attack, and because it is a crucial function to the rest of the system, I think Apple was well within reason to choose the "push" option. I wouldn't want them to do that for anything less than a grave threat, but I'm glad they chose to do it in this case, as it will save a lot of grief and protect users.

As with the remote "kill switch" ability Apple has (again, strictly for protecting users from remote invasions), Apple is extremely hesitant to use the ability -- but it needs to be there for safety.

Hear Hear, Chas

Ian
 
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Dear verdi1901

As chscag says, it's a NTP security update and it doesn't show in software updates nor can you easily tell if it has been updated or the current status of your NTP.

I'd forget it if I were you; but if you really must know, check out this posting which explains in detail what NTP is and how you can find out whether yours is current - NTP Critical Security Update for OS X Released by Apple, All Mac Users Should Install Now | OSXDaily

Ian

It certainly shows in my Software Updates.
 

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