Removing Nail Glue/Keyboard Paint

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I accidentally got some nail glue on the keyboard of my macbook pro, and not realizing it, I closed my laptop. An hour later the nail glue had dried, and when I opened the laptop the glue had adhered to the screen and took the paint off of 2 of my keyboard keys. So now I not only have spots of nail glue on the screen, but there is paint on these spots, so I can't see through it. Is there any way to remove the nail glue, or even just the paint on top of it so I can see through the glue?
 
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Sorry about your problem - I had to look up the contents of 'nail glue' - the main adhesive component is a cyanoacrylate (i.e. CA like in Super Glue which I use in my woodworking shop); debonding agents are mainly acetone which should be AVOIDED. Now the keycaps can be replaced but the glue on your screen remains a problem - you might need to take the laptop to an Apple store for an opinion. Hopefully others may 'chime in' w/ more specific advice. Good luck - Dave :)
 
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Norwood is a Mid-2010 15 inch MacBook Pro with 10.11.1.

pigoo3

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You didn't really tell us what MacBook Pro model you have (MacBook Pro's have been around since 2006)…and the material covering the display varies. Newer models have a glass-like panel covering the display screen…while older (4-5+ years old) MacBook Pro's do not have a glass covering.

As RadDave mentioned. Almost any substance capable of removing "nail glue" will most likely be solvent based…and most likely (or probably) do more damage than good.

As far as the glass panel covering the display of newer MacBook Pro's. There are many types of "glass"…and I'm not 100% sure the type of glass covering newer MacBook Pro's is resistant to solvents. And unless someone has a sample of the material (glass) covering the MacBook Pro's display to "test" a solvent on…I definitely wouldn't use the actual MacBook Pro display as the test material (since it could be damaged).

If this is a newer MacBook Pro with a glass panel covering the display…if it were me…I would GENTLY try using a mechanical way of removing this "nail glue". By "mechanical" I mean using a thin edged plastic device of some sort to try to flick or scrape the nail glue off.

If this doesn't work…MAYBE & GENTLY & CAREFULLY try using a razor blade. I'm hesitant to suggest this…since I'm not 100% sure that the glass material covering the display is resistant to the potential damage that scraping with a razor blade may do.

For example…"Gorilla Glass" used on iPhones & iPads can be scratched…versus glass used in the typical home window that can (no problem) be scraped with a razor blade.

And of course…if this is an older MacBook Pro…by no means use any solvent or mechanical device to try to remove the nail glue. Since either method will lead to more damage.

On the other hand.(if you're a risk-taker). Technically the display is currently slightly ruined/damaged due to the nail glue…so maybe the potential risk or success of trying a scraping method may be worth the risk.

Your call,

- Nick
 
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@ Cmcarden - keep in mind that 'nail polish remover' is basically acetone and lacquer thinner is just as potent a solvent (I use both in my woodworking shop). Dave :)
 

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