ow can I prevent access to "the neighbors" wifi from an iPad

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How can I prevent access to "the neighbors" wifi from an iPad or iTouch? We have rules in the house on usage of out wifi, and we filter devices on our router. However, the kids are able to pick up the neighbors wifi and the neighbors are not cooperating with us to change the password. How can I block access of the device to the neighbors wifi?
 

Slydude

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Ask the neighbor if they are willing to turn on MAC filtering. Even most older routers support this feature. No need to change the password. The filtering is based on the ID number of the iPad networking hardware. It's not perfect since the mac address can be spoofed with access to the right information.

Here's one example of the setup
http://www.instructables.com/id/Wireless-Router-Security/
 
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If the neighbours are happy with the situation then why not continue using their bandwidth. The ball is in their court.
 

pigoo3

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If the neighbours are happy with the situation then why not continue using their bandwidth. The ball is in their court.

It's not about bandwidth. I think that the OP is trying to prevent their children from accessing the internet when they're not supposed to.

With free access to the neighbor's WIFI…the children are breaking the parents "internet use" rules.

- Nick
 
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Precisely Nick, thank you.

Also, if I can't get the neighbors to change the password, I am equally unlikely to get them to allow us to add the devices in question to the MAC address filtering. It's a good suggestion but I'll try.

However, I'm ultimately trying to prevent OUR iPad from accessing THEIR WiFi.

Thanks all
 
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Precisely Nick, thank you.

Also, if I can't get the neighbors to change the password, I am equally unlikely to get them to allow us to add the devices in question to the MAC address filtering. It's a good suggestion but I'll try.

However, I'm ultimately trying to prevent OUR iPad from accessing THEIR WiFi.

Well, you're likely correct about the MAC filtering, but the process works in the other direction the last time I used it on my first 802.11b Linksys router (pre-WPA2) - if activated, the MAC address (which looks like this: 54:26:96:d2:d8:87) of each device on THEIR network has to be entered (maybe it's automated these days - don't know) NOT that of your iPad (that is how you would be excluded from connecting to their router) - now, I have at least a dozen devices in my house (including my Rokus and other electronic AV equipment) that have MAC addresses - changing a password is a 'piece of cake' to using MAC filtering and adding all of those hexadecimal numbers!

BTW, how many iDevices are you having to control in your home? You can always go from the other direction and use Settings -> General -> Restrictions on those devices used by your kids but I don't know 'how many' you have, their ages, or the number of these machines you need to try to control. I'll be curious what other suggestions arise.

If interested, this is an oft discussed topic in the iPad Forums, if you've not been there? Good luck - Dave :)
 
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When my kids were younger I had the same problem, only I lived in a condo where there were literally dozens of other networks they could get on with their devices.

Other than knocking on a lot of doors, I had to come up with another way of managing the situation, and that involved holding their devices during the times they weren't allowed to use the internet. I could not come up with a technical solution beyond setting up a literal RF screen on my walls. :)

Good Luck!
 
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how about parental controls? Lot's of options? None may be perfect, but at least some control can be had.
 
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Precisely Nick, thank you.

Also, if I can't get the neighbors to change the password, I am equally unlikely to get them to allow us to add the devices in question to the MAC address filtering. It's a good suggestion but I'll try.

However, I'm ultimately trying to prevent OUR iPad from accessing THEIR WiFi.

Thanks all


So I'm assuming that they have no real password or if they do everyone and your children know it???

So if they won't, and as the password is known to you, why not change it for them? That may wake them up a bit as well.

But I'm wondering why one would even connect to their wi-fi as the signal must be fairly weak, or they are very close to you range wise. ;)
 
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Here is the main issue in this.

1. if you turn off the wifi and the kids can't access the internet several applications on the iPad won't function because they require internet access.
 
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Why not simply take their devices away when online time is over? I do this why my boys. When their online time is over, they plug their electronic into a power strip in a shelf in the family room. That way, I see their devices and know they are not using them.
 

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The difficulty here is that any workable and practical solution is going to depend on changes outside of your own home. Changing the WiFi password or turning on MAC filtering is going to require your neighbours to get involved. Thus, I see two possible solutions. First, I could offer parenting tips but I'm in no position to do that nor would I (I was going to suggest talking to your children but it's up to you to manage your relationship with them). Second, you could offer to change things for your neighbours and re-configure machines for them if they really don't want to change things.
 

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Second, you could offer to change things for your neighbours and re-configure machines for them if they really don't want to change things.

This is one option I was thinking. Maybe the neighbor's don't want to do it simply because it's a pain…or they don't remember how to do it.

And if things are changed (password)…the neighbor's should be instructed not to give out the WiFi password (and if they have children)…to tell the children not to give out the new WiFi password.

If both of these neighbors have children (especially younger children) and they play together…this is certainly the weak link. The children just innocently give away the WiFi passwords to promote playing with each other (or together) with their electronic devices.

So if the kids keep giving away the WiFi passwords (new or old)…headaches!:(

- Nick
 

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