Mac Pro 5,1 Login and Maintenance

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Hello,

After a sojourn from Apple/Macs of about 30 years, I am returning to the fold like a lost sheep. I recently purchased a Mac Pro 5,1, Yosemite, Quad Core Xeon
2.8 Ghz, 2 x 2TB HDDs, 8GB ECC RAM, and an ATI Radeon 5770 Graphics card to mention a few items. I do a lot of NLE and Audio work.

I have been a Microsoft user since the mid 80s so am familiar with all the vagaries and challenges that has presented me with.

I will have the Mac in a few days and would like an opinion before I am tempted to light it off.

I am the only user of my networked PCs and laptops, none of them use a login or password, they just start up when needed. My most powerful PC is a dual boot Dell running XP Pro and Windows 7 Ultimate; this PC has 6 TB of HD storage.

1) I would like to have the Mac also start up without having to login each time. Now I don’t mind setting up a user ID and password and having it ask for the password when I am installing new apps, but not on each startup or every time I sneeze.

2) I do regular maintenance including backups and disc cleaning and so on. Will disc cleaning by advisable or necessary on the Mac?

Would anyone care to comment and share their knowledge and experience in these matters.

Thanks in advance.
 
M

MacInWin

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1. That is doable. After you create your user account, in System Preferences, Security & Privacy, uncheck "Disable Automatic Login" and it should automatically log you in when it starts. Be advised you are thereby giving anybody who gains physical access to your machine access to your account as well. You will be prompted if you install new software, or if you try to run something you got from the internet, just to make sure you really do want to do that.

2. No. All you need is Onyx from here. Get the version for Yosemite. Run it once every 6 months to a year, with the default settings. Done.

Note: Because you are getting Onyx from the developer at that site, Yosemite will ask you the first time if you are sure you want to run it because it came from the internet. Just say yes one time and after that Yosemite won't ask again. Also, when you kick off Onyx, it will prompt for an administrator's password. It needs that authority to do the maintenance. If you are an admin account, just give your password, and if you are NOT an admin, give an admin login and password.

Now, I strongly recommend against autologin, personally, it's kind of like leaving your house unlocked so you don't have to take out the keys to get in. Just isn't secure. Logging in is a one time event, it's not that painful to do and it gives some coverage if/when someone gets physical access to your machine. Small price to pay for that security.
 
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1. That is doable. After you create your user account, in System Preferences, Security & Privacy, uncheck "Disable Automatic Login" and it should automatically log you in when it starts. Be advised you are thereby giving anybody who gains physical access to your machine access to your account as well. You will be prompted if you install new software, or if you try to run something you got from the internet, just to make sure you really do want to do that.

2. No. All you need is Onyx from here. Get the version for Yosemite. Run it once every 6 months to a year, with the default settings. Done.

Thanks very much Jake for the prompt response.

1. I have never had a problem not having to login in the past decades on any of my gear. If anyone breaks into my house to steal anything they will have to deal with two sets of very sharp teeth with fur attached and the Sheriff when I am not there. However I may just set up the Mac Pro to require a login and see how it goes. If no issues arise, then I shall leave it that way. If it is problematic I can always reverse that decision.

2. I will download Onyx and install it as you recommend. I will find it strange only doing maintenance once or twice a year. On my Microsoft machines, it is usually a daily routine. I will read up on Onyx too before I install it so that I will be ready to go as soon as I have my hands on the Mac Pro.

3. Should I start a new thread on the subject of Malware etc., or can I highjack this thread that I started. Malware falls loosely under the umbrella of maintenance.

Thanks again, and I am sure I will be back often looking for tips and advice.

Peter B.
 
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M

MacInWin

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If you do a search on this site for Onyx, you'll find it probably the single most recommended tool. I have been using it for years with no problems.

Malware: Let's keep it here. There is a sticky thread here that talks about it. Basically, there are no true viruses for OS X in the wild at this time. Most A/V software looks for Windows Viruses, which cannot attack OS X. Personally, I think AV is useless in this environment and don't run any. If you feel a need for it, ClamXAV (it's free) is probably what I would recommend. I've run it before, but all it finds is an email or an attachment in email from Windows users that have some virus attached. As I said, those viruses cannot attack OS X, so they are harmless to you. You CAN pass them on to Windows users, of course, but most Windows users already have some A/V so I don't bother to scan anymore.

There is Malware of other types. Java and Flash have holes in them you could drive a truck through. I don't use Java and have Flash turned off unless I authorize it when I may need it. Get both from trusted sources and only update them through System Preferences panes and you should be ok.

Adware is getting more prevalent. Stay away from CNET, Softonic and Download.com. They pack adware on just about every download and then use your authorization of the installation you want to also install their crapware. To block most of that, you can get AdBlock+ or Ghostery. If you do get an attack of Adware, AdwareMedic should clean it out. I have all three, use Ghostery to prevent adware and have it set to the highest settings (block EVERYTHING). Some URLs look funny, but that's ok, I just want the content, not the ads.

In System preferences, under Security & Privacy, there is a setting for "Allow Apps downloaded from:" that has three choices. The default is "Mac App Store and identified developers." I suggest you stick with that setting. The lower security is "Anywhere" and the higher is "Mac App Store." Apple tests installers really carefully, so MAS is a good safe place. They also certify developers and those are in the "Identified" category. But there are other safe developers (Onyx is one of them.) What happens is that when you download Onyx and run the installation process you'll get a system message warning that this application came from the Internet and do you really want to run it. If you trust the source, go ahead and run it and you won't be asked again. That's Gatekeeper trying to protect you from nasty stuff on the Internet.

That's a ton of information. I'll let you digest that for a bit to see if you have questions.
 
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Once again Jake thanks for the reply.

You have given me a lot to absorb and think about. I will follow your advice to the letter. You are absolutely right about CNET, Softonic and Download.com; while I have been to their websites I am very wary of any downloads from them. The only way they can make money, and that is what it is all about for them, is to load their downloads with crapware. It is enough to make one want to throw up.

I am developing a do-list of things to "do" when I get the Mac Pro, your posts have given me an advantage. I owe you at least a 6 pack as a minimum, if not a full case. Name your poison.

If FedEx (whom I hate) follow through and deliver the Mac Pro Tuesday to my second home on the beach, I will truck it back to my main home later that day. With a bit of luck and a big stick, I will light it off on Wednesday.

I will keep you posted, it is going to be an adventure, but a good one I am certain.

Best regards,

Peter B.
 
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Hi Peter!

Long time Windows user (30+ years) and recent convert (18 months) to the world of Apple. When I got my first Macbook Pro, I had the same questions you have.

Jake is giving you very good advice. I know as I have tried it all and found it sound.

I understand the paranoid feeling of letting go of the need to run registry cleaners, scan for malware, clean out caches etc. At first I had to have an antivirus installed. If there was an antivirus to install, I did it. I tried them all found I didn't need them. Now I don't even run clamXav which is a very basic AV.

Install what Jake suggested (Onyx, Adblock+, Ghostery), run Onyx and you will be amazed at how easy it will be to keep you Mac running smoothly.

One suggestion from one former Windows user to another - Macs require you eject (unmount) external disks before removing them from a USB port. Just offering this as it was the hardest thing for me to remember because it is different from Windows. All I will say is if you do not eject external disks, bad things can happen - your computer will admonish you, your external may require disk repairs.

I am a video editor and I use a lot of external storage. I have a Windows 7 editor and I use my MB Pro to edit too. You will love your new Mac Pro - I am envious!

Lisa
 
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chas_m

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I will say that if you're using this machine for NLE video editing and audio production, I would *strongly* recommend upgrading the RAM to at least double what you have now, and really you should think about 32GB or more if you can afford to do so. It can go as high as 48GB.
 
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Hi Peter!

Long time Windows user (30+ years) and recent convert (18 months) to the world of Apple. When I got my first Macbook Pro, I had the same questions you have.

Jake is giving you very good advice. I know as I have tried it all and found it sound.

I understand the paranoid feeling of letting go of the need to run registry cleaners, scan for malware, clean out caches etc. At first I had to have an antivirus installed. If there was an antivirus to install, I did it. I tried them all found I didn't need them. Now I don't even run clamXav which is a very basic AV.

Install what Jake suggested (Onyx, Adblock+, Ghostery), run Onyx and you will be amazed at how easy it will be to keep you Mac running smoothly.

One suggestion from one former Windows user to another - Macs require you eject (unmount) external disks before removing them from a USB port. Just offering this as it was the hardest thing for me to remember because it is different from Windows. All I will say is if you do not eject external disks, bad things can happen - your computer will admonish you, your external may require disk repairs.

I am a video editor and I use a lot of external storage. I have a Windows 7 editor and I use my MB Pro to edit too. You will love your new Mac Pro - I am envious!

Lisa

Thanks Lisa for your encouraging words.

Switching from MS to Mac is a bit like switching countries, and my wife and I have done that three times since we were married 50 years ago mainly for work related reasons like $$$s. New customs, slightly different language, different ways of doing things and so on. But one soon gets into the swing of things by shaking loose of the past.

It is interesting that you recommend ejecting external drives before disconnecting them…I have started doing that again with my PCs. Maybe there is a Mac God up there somewhere holding my hand. Usually I have no need to eject my external drives unless I am doing something out of the ordinary like doing a hardware fix.

My Dell 755 has two internal HDs, one 500 GB and a 1 TB plus two 500 GB and one 2 TB externals where I keep my pics and video files. Plus a number of 500 GB and 1 TB portables used for long term storage.

Best regards from a sunny 60s Florida.

Peter B.
 
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I will say that if you're using this machine for NLE video editing and audio production, I would *strongly* recommend upgrading the RAM to at least double what you have now, and really you should think about 32GB or more if you can afford to do so. It can go as high as 48GB.

Thanks Chas for the suggestion re. the memory.

The Mac Pro should arrive today, it is on a FedEx truck somewhere between West Palm Beach and Jensen Beach. As soon as it is here, I am going to try and not open the box, I am going to truck it back to our main home on the west coast of Florida today then it will get unpacked and lit off. The starting gate is getting closer and I am chomping on the bit.

Best regards,

Peter B.
 
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MacInWin

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I want to comment on unmounting drives before disconnecting them. That's how you are supposed to do it in both Windows and OS X. Windows will notice the disconnect if you don't, but OS X will actually complain. It's not a good practice in ANY Operating system, so always unmount or eject the drive before yanking the plug.
 
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Yes I know ejecting is a good thing in both OS's. But with Windows, I have never had any issues. That is not true with OS X. I have had a wide variety of issues that resulted it using disk utility to fix the drive, using Windows to fix an extFat drive, and once having to reformat the drive - thank goodness I had nothing to lose on the drive. It has been a hard lesson to learn because it is a very ingrained bad habit.

Oh, and I agree with Chas - the more memory the better. My main editor has dual 2.5 Xeon processors and 24GB of memory. It is a Windows 7 machine and she is getting some age but I can turn out mountains of work. She still encodes an hour video in under 12 minutes. And I haven't saved enough yet for the Mac Pro I want. I am an independent contractor so I furnish my own equipment.

Lisa
 
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I have never had a problem unplugging drives in Windows post 95, but if Macs object, I will eject them first. Most of the time my externals stay connected.

Peter B.
 
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I now have the Mac Pro at the house; I trucked it back form the East coast of Florida to the West Coast yesterday. I lit it off last evening, everything seems OK so far. I will have a load more questions on various subjects but will post them in new threads.

A big thanks to everyone for the guidance, advice and comments.

Peter B.
 

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