Impossible to clean iPad Air 2 screen

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Hi all, purchased a space gray iPad Air 2 when it first came out. I'm finding that it is near impossible to get the screen clean of fingerprints and oil. I had the first gen iPad Air and all it took was a few rubs with a microfiber cloth to get rid of the fingerprints, however that is no longer the case. No matter how hard I try, I can never get the screen clean. It seems as if the new "anti-reflective" coating on the iPad is a fingerprint magnet. Anyone else noticing this?
 
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same problem

Have the same problem. Was thinking about getting a replacement as its pretty annoying. The only way to get it clean is to use one of those alcohol wipe things but that can't be doing it any good surely.
 
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Have the same problem. Was thinking about getting a replacement as its pretty annoying. The only way to get it clean is to use one of those alcohol wipe things but that can't be doing it any good surely.

Hi All - welcome to the forum! :) Here is Apple's Advice for screen cleaning, i.e. no abrasives, liquids, sprays, or solvents; thus, alcohol is verboten - sorry.

I use a microfiber cloth (like the ones for glasses & optical discs) - now I do put a few drops of water on the cloth - not sure that it adds much but no risk of liquid damage; of course, you could look into some type of protective screen which would be more amenable to cleaning or replacement. Just be very careful - Dave
 

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iPad's are touch screen devices. You can clean the display as much as you want. But the VERY FIRST TIME you touch the display…BAMM…there's your first fingerprint.

Finger tips, hands, skin have natural oils on them…and this is what gets left behind when you touch things. Why do you think various law enforcement agencies use finger prints for identification of criminals. Fingerprints are EVERYWHERE!;)

- Nick
 

IWT


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I, like Dave, use a microfibre cloth (an E-cloth in the UK). I either "breathe" on the screen and use the cloth or, like Dave, dampen the cloth (not wet it) and apply.

With regards to Nick's comments — the proteins & "oils" which transfer as fingerprints also transfer bacteria and, possibly, viruses (the latter have a much shorter "shelf life" if I can put it that way). But my point is that these touch screen devices are a real and potential source of cross infection so keeping them clean is a health issue as well as a cosmetic one.

Moreover, sharing such devices requires vigilance, care and polite discretion. Although clearly impossible in all situations, I try to wash my hands before using my iOS devices and my iMac keyboard. In the latter case, it makes the keys much less sticky.

Just a few thoughts.

Ian
 
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I can't recall the last time I've even had to clean my older iPad 2 as using either of the stylus pens I bought makes it unnecessary. It might be worth a try. ;)

They also work better than my fingers which don't seem to hold much capacitance or whatever is needed, besides they are short and fat and not that precise. Much nicer experience using a proper stylus pen. ;)
 
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.............But my point is that these touch screen devices are a real and potential source of cross infection so keeping them clean is a health issue as well as a cosmetic one.

Moreover, sharing such devices requires vigilance, care and polite discretion. Although clearly impossible in all situations, I try to wash my hands before using my iOS devices and my iMac keyboard. In the latter case, it makes the keys much less sticky........

Hi Ian - good points above about potential health issues - now our iPads are not shared, but if in a family w/ kids that might be sick and were iDevices are indeed shared, then keeping the screens cleaned is more of a concern. Dave :)
 

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With regards to Nick's comments — the proteins & "oils" which transfer as fingerprints also transfer bacteria and, possibly, viruses (the latter have a much shorter "shelf life" if I can put it that way). But my point is that these touch screen devices are a real and potential source of cross infection so keeping them clean is a health issue as well as a cosmetic one.

Microbes are everywhere:

- Doorknobs
- remote controls
- cellphones
- just about every surface in or outside of the home
- shopping cart handles
- other peoples hands when you shake hands
- keyboards
- and of course iPads

You can drive yourself insane worrying about microbes. What doesn't kill you makes you stronger. Ha ha. I have a fairly extensive background in microbiology, food microbiology, biochemistry, etc. I don't worry about microbes that much. I wash my hands after the bathroom…before eating…after handling raw meats or seafood…or whenever it seems correct. But I don't obsess about.;)

Yes…"idevices" can certainly be a place for microbes to accumulate. But no worse than a TV remote control, cell phone, or doorknob. The idea is not to:

- sneeze on the iPad
- spit on the iPad (think FaceTime on the iPad)
- or pick your nose when using an iPad. Ha ha. lol

The iPad display is just a surface. And like any surface anywhere…it will have microbes on it.

Of course sharing an iPad increases the risk. But again…shaking someone's hand, turning a doorknob, or using a department store shopping cart all have microbes too. The idea is don't touch your eyes, or stick dirty fingers inside any body orifices (such as the mouth) before washing them.

- Nick
 
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I never had this problem with my IPAD Air 1, thats why I'm starting to think this is a fault with the coating. The fingerprints become like a thin sheen of cloudy residue on top of the screen. With my iPad air 1 I could just use a microfibre cloth like someone said above, not in this case with the air 2.
 

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