HDMI Adapters advice please.

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I have recently installed an overhead projector and sound system in our local village hall. Connection is via HDMI which is fine for most Windows laptops used by our users. I now need to provide suitable connections (laptop to HDMI Male plug) for macbook users and looking for suggestions please. Users could be regular hirers or visiting speakers and I guess I need to allow for any macbooks up to ten years old.
 

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HDMI is HDMI, regardless of whether it's a Windows computer or Mac. There are multiple versions of HDMI, but that predominantly deals with varying level of security for video playback to deal with piracy.

On the computer, you should be fine with ANY adapter that has a female HDMI end to it, like this:


You'll obviously want to figure out the length you want. You can also go with 2 traditional Male to Male HDMI cable and use a female to female adapter like this

 

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... need to allow for any macbooks up to ten years old.
If you're mainly looking for an adapter (xyz port on different model Mac's to HDMI)...and you're trying to accommodate any portable Mac from the last 10 years...you're probably going to need at least 2-3 different adapters.

Different portable Mac's over the last 10 years have different video-out ports...thus going to need multiple HDMI adapters.

For example...newer MacBook Pro and MacBook Air's only have USB-C ports...thus you would need a USB-C to HMDI adapter for these models. Older MacBook's, MacBook Pro's, and MacBook Air's...going to need a different adapter...such as a mini-displayport to HDMI (aka Thunderbolt to HDMI).

Could possibly be 1 or 2 other combinations as well. I would head over the Everymac.com...and look through the model list for each Mac model (MacBook, MacBook Pro, MacBook Air)...if you wanted to be 100% sure you had everything from the last 10 years covered.

There are some MacBook Pro models from the last 10 years that have an HDMI port...thus you wouldn't need an adapter for these...since the HDMI cable from the projector will connect directly.:)

Nick
 
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Sawday
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HDMI is HDMI, regardless of whether it's a Windows computer or Mac. There are multiple versions of HDMI, but that predominantly deals with varying level of security for video playback to deal with piracy.

On the computer, you should be fine with ANY adapter that has a female HDMI end to it, like this:


You'll obviously want to figure out the length you want. You can also go with 2 traditional Male to Male HDMI cable and use a female to female adapter like this

Thnks Ashwin... but the issue is that I think only the Macbook Pro has an HDMI output. It's the rest of the line up I need to connect.
 
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If you're mainly looking for an adapter (xyz port on different model Mac's to HDMI)...and you're trying to accommodate any portable Mac from the last 10 years...you're probably going to need at least 2-3 different adapters.

Different portable Mac's over the last 10 years have different video-out ports...thus going to need multiple HDMI adapters.

For example...newer MacBook Pro and MacBook Air's only have USB-C ports...thus you would need a USB-C to HMDI adapter for these models. Older MacBook's, MacBook Pro's, and MacBook Air's...going to need a different adapter...such as a mini-displayport to HDMI (aka Thunderbolt to HDMI).

Could possibly be 1 or 2 other combinations as well. I would head over the Everymac.com...and look through the model list for each Mac model (MacBook, MacBook Pro, MacBook Air)...if you wanted to be 100% sure you had everything from the last 10 years covered.

There are some MacBook Pro models from the last 10 years that have an HDMI port...thus you wouldn't need an adapter for these...since the HDMI cable from the projector will connect directly.:)

Nick
Thanks Nick - That's exactly what I wanted to know. USC-C and Thunderbolt adaptors just ordered. Regards,
 

Slydude

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Some schools here are avoiding the whole cable confusion by having some of their projectors connected to Apple TV devices. Most of them have a descriptive name such as the room number where they are located. Since most of the computers that come into the building are already on the same network or have been recently mirroring the screen wirelessly is easy.

I haven't tried i with PCs.
 
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For example...newer MacBook Pro and MacBook Air's only have USB-C ports...thus you would need a USB-C to HMDI adapter for these models.

This is a common mistake. While recent Macs do indeed have USB-C connection hardware, the port protocol itself is Firewire 3 or 4. If you purchase a simple USB-C to HDMI adapter, you will likely get unexpectedly poor results unless the adapter also supports Thunderbolt 3/4. I hear from folks who have made this mistake constantly.

For instance, this inexpensive adapter tells you up front that it supports Thunderbolt 3:

USB C to HDMI Adapter ([email protected]), Type-C to HDMI Adapter [Thunderbolt 3 Compatible]
$8
https://www.amazon.com/Adapter-Thunderbolt-Compatible-Aluminium-Surface/dp/B09PHGHCBX/ref=sr_1_6
 

pigoo3

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This is a common mistake. While recent Macs do indeed have USB-C connection hardware, the port protocol itself is Firewire 3 or 4. If you purchase a simple USB-C to HDMI adapter, you will likely get unexpectedly poor results unless the adapter also supports Thunderbolt 3/4. I hear from folks who have made this mistake constantly.
I think the statement "This is a common mistake" is a bit strong.

Any USB-C to HDMI adapter is going to provide the user with results (for example if someone wants to connect an external monitor to their MacBook Pro). What you're saying is getting a USB-C to HDMI adapter that supports Thunderbolt 3/4 will yield better results.:)

A similar analogy would be...if someone gets an HDMI 1.4 cable they're going to get results (video output)...but using an HDMI 2.0 cable will yield better results (more bandwidth).

Nick
 
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I think the statement "This is a common mistake" is a bit strong.

I don't think so. Not a week goes by where I don't hear from two or three folks who have had a problem with this.

It's not even an uncommon mistake to see users on this very forum make.

Any USB-C to HDMI adapter is going to provide the user with results (for example if someone wants to connect an external monitor to their MacBook Pro). What you're saying is getting a USB-C to HDMI adapter that supports Thunderbolt 3/4 will yield better results.:)

No, I've heard from folks who purchased expensive 4K monitors who got a USB-C to HDMI adapter to attach to it, and they found that they got totally unusable results. (Not to mention the fact that some adapters, even among those that support Thunderbolt 3, have a higher spec than others.)

Sure, it makes a difference what you are connecting too. If you are connecting to a low resolution peripheral, chances are that it won't make a difference. But then again, why not just be careful and purchase a Thunderbolt 3 adapter to use with a Thunderbolt 3 port and avoid any problems to begin with?
 
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USB-3 and Mini DisplayPort adaptors purchased. Will check they actually work in due course. Fingers crossed.
 

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