cold weather

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Does cold temperatures hurt my mac desktop

The desktop is in an unheated garage. I live in NE so temps get down to 20's in garage. The computer is typically on BUT if it was suggested I turn it off I would. Thats one of the reasons I'm asking for input. Since it is not mine I do not have the mac model.
 
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pigoo3

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Usually desktop computers are kept indoors where it is heated during cold weather. What sort of temps are we talking?

- Nick
 
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Does cold temperatures hurt my mac desktop

Hello & welcome to the forum! :) Now you've provided little useful information to respond to your terse question - please provide: 1) iMac model; 2) What temperatures are you talking about; 3) Is the computer on or off when subjected to these temperatures; and 4) What location(s) are you referring to (e.g. in a house, transporting in a vehicle and/or others)?

Quoted below from Apple's website shows 50 degrees F as the lower end for running an iMac - I suspect that going into the 40s would not be a major issue - some discussion HERE from a forum thread dated a few years ago. SO, what are you trying to ask - be specific. Dave
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pigoo3

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Quoted below from Apple's website shows 50 degrees F as the lower end for running an iMac - I suspect that going into the 40s would not be a major issue - some discussion from a forum thread dated a few years ago.

This is what I was going to do next (quote the official Apple spec's)…thanks for posting it.:)

I agree…I think that the 40's (at least the upper 40's°F) shouldn't bring too much concern. I think that the main issue with lower temps is with thermal shock of the components. And harder on mechanical devices…such as spinning HD's and optical drives. Kind of like starting a car in cold weather.

And with laptops if the temps get too low (below freezing)…the stability of the display.

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I have an RV that recommends I remove the TV (flat panel LED) from the vehicle if it's going to be below freezing.

The biggest problem with the computer is if it's exposed to warm temps immediately after cold. You WILL get condensation in the computer. Water is NOT your friend. Water WILL condense inside the computer if the dew point is above the temperature of the computer body. This is what happens in your bathroom after a shower. The room temp is below the dew point so the water vapor in the air condenses on the cooler surface.

I DON'T think long term exposure to cold temps will effect the computer, BUT it should be warmed up gradually to prevent internal condensation before it's used. I would be FAR more concerned with condensation that thermal shock.

ken
 
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I have an RV that recommends I remove the TV (flat panel LED) from the vehicle if it's going to be below freezing.

The biggest problem with the computer is if it's exposed to warm temps immediately after cold. You WILL get condensation in the computer.........

I DON'T think long term exposure to cold temps will effect the computer, BUT it should be warmed up gradually to prevent internal condensation before it's used......

Hi Ken - excellent points concerning condensation - just wanted to get a little more information on the topic, so for those interested, check HERE and also hit the link on 'humidity' - Dave :)
 

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