Canon Vs. Nikon

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I am in the market for a DSLR and not sure about which to get. I have a Canon film camera and am thinking getting a DSLR body and using my sigma lenses would be best but I am not sure. I read about "Error 99" and am wondering how often that actually happens to the canons. For that reason I kind of thought about getting a nikon. Please help!
 

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You're going to get a lot of people saying they like Nikon...and you're going to get a lot of people saying they like Canon.

If you already have lenses that will fit a DSLR...then that may be the way to go.

It's really a personal choice.

- Nick
 
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There really is no right or wrong answer to this debate. They are both great companies, and both have their pros and con's to each person. The best thing you can do is buy the unit that feels the best in your hands, the one with the nicest menu system, and of course one that works with lens' you may already have.

I personally shoot Nikon, but I'll guarantee that I take photo's just as good with a Cannon. Just purchase the one that feels right, and you won't be wrong.
 

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If you are into Canon for your film camera, you might check out Canon for your DSLR. I have nothing against Nikon but did notice a big difference in the controls, Menus and the way it worked compared to my Canon and it took a while to get used to the differences. Having Canon lenses might be another good reason to go with the Canon.

Both are excellent cameras.

I went with a Canon and used my friends even more expensive Nikon on a photo shot and really liked the way the Canon worked. With the Nikon I always seemed to be trying to figure it out Vs just using the Canon and not missing a good shot. Could just be me but that is what I noticed.

Also Phototini's advise is very good.
 
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chas_m

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Ah, the Ford v. Chevy debate of the photography world ... :)

I'm personally more of a Canon person, but I'm actually looking outside either company for my next camera (and I have a Nikon D70s sitting right next to me) just for variety's sake.
 
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Is your film camera an EF mount?

Canon's big advantage over Nikon would be video, but that's if you even plan on doing video.

Either or, you can't go wrong.

And Err99 is basically a catch all error that displays when something happens. It's not an error that's tied to one problem and it's not something you should worry about. I've had 4 Canon DSLRs and only one of them had ever had problem...and go figure, it was the one that cost nearly $3000.
 
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It might be that your existing Canon lenses will not fit or work on the new digi body.
Nikon lenses will fit a new nikon body. Nikon MF lenses can only be used in manual mode.
Nikon AF lenses are usually OK for new digi bodies. I don't know about the Canon's. I always thought that it was only Nikon that allowed older lenses to fit newer bodies, but I might be wrong.

Newer Nikon DSLRs will shoot video and do live view.
I'm a Nikon guy, have been since the early 90s. Nikon SLRs and DSLRs.
Saying that, I buy Canon compacts as Nikon Compacts just don't make the mark.
Nikon SLRs, in my book, are unbeatable.

The Canon G10 is the best (digital) compact I have ever owned, and that's now been superseded by the G11.

If you have Canon kit, then the Canon bodies might have a similar feel to them.
The move from my film Nikon 8008s (801s in Europe) to my digital D-100 was easy thanks to my familiarity to Nikon kit, but there was still a large learning curve.

Try and get your hands on a few bodies. Some DSLRs are very small and light. I hate them.
Nothing beats having a go and finding out how it feels in the hands.
 

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Either choice would be great, but I would also suggest doing an honest evaluation of what you want out of your DSLR. You might find that a micro 4/3rds system (Panasonic or Olympus) may actually be a better choice, depending on your needs.
 
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Canon versus Nikon - photo.net

Hours and Hours of reading here. good luck. remember a lens does not operate the same on a Digital camera vs film. Also make sure the AF will work on the whatever camera you get. different contacts, motor in camera vs lens are two things to consider.
 
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I tend to agree with the posters here. Both Nikon and Canon make quality cameras. When I switched to DSLR I wasn't able to use my film lenses as I was shooting a Canon F-1 at the time. I stayed with Canon just because I was comfortable with it. I have three Canon DSLRs and never seen an "Error 99.

Good Luck
 
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remember a lens does not operate the same on a Digital camera vs film.

Why? A canon EF mount lens that will autofocus on an SLR will act the same exact way on a DSLR, the only difference may be the FOV depending on the sensor size. Actual operation is not affected by the crop factor.
 
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Out of all the posts you'll ever find in any forum, the only ones which make the most logical sense are those which suggest (as was above):

1. Making sure the fit is right. This not only means that it should fit your hand very comfortably, but that the controls and menu system make logical sense to YOU. I personally find Canon controls and menu systems illogical and far too deeply situated.

2. Budget. While I am a Nikon guy. I am because I thought it was worth it to save for good glass, in order to stick with the other qualities that I bought it for, which boil down to great low light, high ISO performance, ergonomics, and an all round better flash system than the competition.

More to the point though... I wish Nikon glass were cheaper. Canon glass is priced far more reasonably IMO. Granted, Nikon make all their own glass, and don't have their hands in as many consumer based products as Canon does but still... they need to lower their prices if they want to compete for the same audience. Maybe they don't ?

I think all the rest has been said. Go to a professional shop and get your hands on a few different models. And do NOT let a salesman form opions for you in any way, shape or form. If you get somebody who says .. sorry, we don't like dealing with brand X or Y because yada yada.. you won't get a straight answer out of them, so don't bother.

Doug
 
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I have used both and agree, you really can't go wrong either way. My current digital rig is Canon, because I liked the lens selection in my price range better.
 
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The first question is what lenses do you have that you would use with the DSLR... realize that unless you go high-end the lenses you have will suffer the multiplier effect of either 1.5x with the Nikon or 1.6x with the Canon.... so odds are you will want to get new lenses even with a Canon if you plan on doing any wide angle work.

That said the best advice you've gotten so far is to see how they feel in your hands.

If cost is a factor then you might want to list out the must haves that you want to meet... and don't forget the flash, your old canon flash wont work on a DSLR so that is an expense you need to keep in mind. Flashes for DSLRs aren't cheap and the non-brand flashes that you could use with film camera don't really exist for digital one.
 
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The first question is what lenses do you have that you would use with the DSLR... realize that unless you go high-end the lenses you have will suffer the multiplier effect of either 1.5x with the Nikon or 1.6x with the Canon.... so odds are you will want to get new lenses even with a Canon if you plan on doing any wide angle work.

That said the best advice you've gotten so far is to see how they feel in your hands.

If cost is a factor then you might want to list out the must haves that you want to meet... and don't forget the flash, your old canon flash wont work on a DSLR so that is an expense you need to keep in mind. Flashes for DSLRs aren't cheap and the non-brand flashes that you could use with film camera don't really exist for digital one.

Older Canon flashes may work on the new DSLR depending on what model it is. Off camera flash is where it's at anyways, so keeping those old flashes regardless of whether or not you get TTL operation with them is something the OP would be better off doing.

What's cheap? You can get proprietary flashes for about $230. That's not expensive with all things considered. There's also 3rd party flashes that will operate with TTL technology. There's also non TTL flashes like the Vivitar 285HV that has an auto setting. It's $95.

The OP hasn't listed what type of camera or lenses he owns now, so telling him they won't work without even knowing what they are is some what foolish.
 
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Older Canon flashes may work on the new DSLR depending on what model it is. Off camera flash is where it's at anyways, so keeping those old flashes regardless of whether or not you get TTL operation with them is something the OP would be better off doing.

What's cheap? You can get proprietary flashes for about $230. That's not expensive with all things considered. There's also 3rd party flashes that will operate with TTL technology. There's also non TTL flashes like the Vivitar 285HV that has an auto setting. It's $95.

The OP hasn't listed what type of camera or lenses he owns now, so telling him they won't work without even knowing what they are is some what foolish.

Actually he did mention he had sigma lenses which means he/she puts some emphasis on being frugal... And simply being able to snap a flash that was designed for a film camera onto a dslr because it will fit is not only risky, but will not work as designed. Someone that is unsure of what camera they want is also someone that isn't looking to buy a camera and manually meter each shot. A film flash uses TTL metering... no Canon or Nikon digital camera is compatible with that type of meter because no film is present in the camera to bounce the flash off... for a canon you need E-TTL capable flashes and for Nikon's i-TTL capable flashes...

Use some older Canon flashes on a new digital Canon and you not only insure that the metering will not work properly but risk damaging the camera because the voltage from older flashes is higher than those supported by the current digital cameras.

So before you go encouraging people to keep old flashes to use with new cameras get your facts straight or you may very well be setting those people up to break their new camera... Now that is beyond foolish its down right nasty.
 
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I'm sure this has been said before, but just pick out the camera from each manufacturer that you like, find a store where they have them, and try out both. There's no such thing as a bad DSLR these days, so go boldly and pick the one you like best. Personally, I chose Nikon, but if you have Canon lenses that will fit, you might want to go that way. The most common nugget that I found in my comparison was "you're buying a lens system, not a body," so if you've already got Canon glass that you want to be able to use and you like their products, go for it.
 
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Actually he did mention he had sigma lenses which means he/she puts some emphasis on being frugal... And simply being able to snap a flash that was designed for a film camera onto a dslr because it will fit is not only risky, but will not work as designed. Someone that is unsure of what camera they want is also someone that isn't looking to buy a camera and manually meter each shot. A film flash uses TTL metering... no Canon or Nikon digital camera is compatible with that type of meter because no film is present in the camera to bounce the flash off... for a canon you need E-TTL capable flashes and for Nikon's i-TTL capable flashes...

Use some older Canon flashes on a new digital Canon and you not only insure that the metering will not work properly but risk damaging the camera because the voltage from older flashes is higher than those supported by the current digital cameras.

So before you go encouraging people to keep old flashes to use with new cameras get your facts straight or you may very well be setting those people up to break their new camera... Now that is beyond foolish its down right nasty.


Thomas you may want to read and clearly understand someone's post before going off the deep end like you did above. :Oops:

What he said in his post was that those older flash units can still be used for OCF (Off Camera Flash). Meaning that at no point does the flash need to be mounted to the hot shoe.

You are also making some very wild assumptions about the OP and the way he spends his money. You also assume that he won't be metering each individual shot, well how do you know?

So please in the future refrain from the attitude displayed above until you are quite certain as to what you have read.

Have a wonderful day!
 
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Actually he did mention he had sigma lenses which means he/she puts some emphasis on being frugal... And simply being able to snap a flash that was designed for a film camera onto a dslr because it will fit is not only risky, but will not work as designed. Someone that is unsure of what camera they want is also someone that isn't looking to buy a camera and manually meter each shot. A film flash uses TTL metering... no Canon or Nikon digital camera is compatible with that type of meter because no film is present in the camera to bounce the flash off... for a canon you need E-TTL capable flashes and for Nikon's i-TTL capable flashes...

Use some older Canon flashes on a new digital Canon and you not only insure that the metering will not work properly but risk damaging the camera because the voltage from older flashes is higher than those supported by the current digital cameras.

So before you go encouraging people to keep old flashes to use with new cameras get your facts straight or you may very well be setting those people up to break their new camera... Now that is beyond foolish its down right nasty.

YAwn.

Canon introduced TTL in their bodies back in '87 through some iteration or another. Depending on how old his old film camera is, it could be an EOS body from 5-10 years back that has a flash that's capable of E-TTL operation. While alledgedly not as accurate at E-TTL II, it would still work as it's the same system. Plus most newer digital cameras I've looked up for people can handle up to 250v through their sync circuit; that's much more than the few and harder to find 12-25v or whatever it was.

And the Vivitar 285HV is made to operate at lower voltages in which those digital cameras that can't handle the higher voltages are safe. And most modern flashes that were developed after the advent of digital cameras iirc.

Facts = straight.
 
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YAwn.

Canon introduced TTL in their bodies back in '87 through some iteration or another. Depending on how old his old film camera is, it could be an EOS body from 5-10 years back that has a flash that's capable of E-TTL operation. While alledgedly not as accurate at E-TTL II, it would still work as it's the same system. Plus most newer digital cameras I've looked up for people can handle up to 250v through their sync circuit; that's much more than the few and harder to find 12-25v or whatever it was.

And the Vivitar 285HV is made to operate at lower voltages in which those digital cameras that can't handle the higher voltages are safe. And most modern flashes that were developed after the advent of digital cameras iirc.

Facts = straight.

Actually, you're almost right. The fact is Canon has a mixed bag in what voltages they can handle. Some DSLR are 6volts and others are 250volts... you need to read the fine print to determine it for certain.
 

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