Upgrading For Speech Dictation

Status
Not open for further replies.
E

Engage

Guest
Hi all,

I'm running OSX 10.6 Snow Leopard, and wish to upgrade to Yosemite so that I can use speech dictation. I'm seeking advice to guide me through that process.

I have a 2009 Macbook, and System Profiler says this;

Model Name: MacBook
Model Identifier: MacBook5,2
Processor Name: Intel Core 2 Duo
Processor Speed: 2.13 GHz
Number Of Processors: 1
Total Number Of Cores: 2
L2 Cache: 3 MB
Memory: 2 GB
Bus Speed: 1.07 GHz
Boot ROM Version: MB52.0088.B06
SMC Version (system): 1.38f5

I know I will have to upgrade the RAM on this machine or buy a new Mac to run Yosemite in a happy manner. So I will ask about RAM first.

Thanks to a generous member here, I have found this RAM:

Computer upgrades for Apple MacBook Models MacBook (13-inch, Mid 2009) from Crucial

However, my manual says this...

For best performance, fill both memory slots and install an equal memory module in each slot. The maximum amount of memory you can install in your MacBook is 2 GB, using one 1 GB DIMM in each memory slot.

Given that I already have 2GB of RAM installed I'm wondering if adding more RAM is even an option for me. Crucial seems to think so, my manual says no.

What say you?

Thanks!
 

pigoo3

Well-known member
Staff member
Admin
Joined
May 20, 2008
Messages
43,396
Reaction score
1,000
Points
113
Location
U.S.
Your Mac's Specs
2011 17" MBP 2.2ghz, 16gig ram, OS 10.11.6
However, my manual says this...

Given that I already have 2GB of RAM installed I'm wondering if adding more RAM is even an option for me. Crucial seems to think so, my manual says no.

What say you?

Officially from Apple your MacBook has a max. ram of 4gig. But it can actually be upgraded to 6gig of ram. So you can either go for the 4gig or 6gig ram upgrade (the 6gig upgrade is a lot more expensive).

- Nick
 
OP
E

Engage

Guest
Thanks Nick.

Any opinion on how well Yosemite will run on my machine if I upgrade to 4GB RAM?

Mavericks was a disaster, but that was with the 2GB RAM.

Trying to get a feel for whether RAM is the main obstacle to running Yosemite, and whether 4GB will actually get the job done.

Speech dictation is my primary concern, if that helps. I don't really need latest greatest features in other areas.

Thanks again.
 

pigoo3

Well-known member
Staff member
Admin
Joined
May 20, 2008
Messages
43,396
Reaction score
1,000
Points
113
Location
U.S.
Your Mac's Specs
2011 17" MBP 2.2ghz, 16gig ram, OS 10.11.6
Any opinion on how well Yosemite will run on my machine if I upgrade to 4GB RAM?

Mavericks was a disaster, but that was with the 2GB RAM.

Well…it will be better than with 2gig!;)

I'm going to say with 4gig of ram (and following some tips listed below)…you should be ok. But many folks are saying 8gig of ram is better (and yes before you say it…I know your MacBook cannot be upgraded to 8gig).;)

Here are a couple article's on "How to speed up Yosemite?":

6 Easy Tips to Speed Up OS X Yosemite on Your Mac | OSXDaily
13 Tips to Optimize Your Mac After Yosemite Installation

Give it a shot!:)

- Nick
 
OP
E

Engage

Guest
Not to be an old curmudgeon concerning Yosemite, but you don't have to upgrade that far to get OS X Speech Dictation, OS X’s free built in dictation comes with OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion or later:.

Aha, great suggestion, thanks much.

Can I assume that my old Mac will have an easier time running Mountain Lion than Mavericks and Yosemite? If yes, that seems the place for me to start.

Hmm, it appears Mountain Lion is $20 while Yosemite is free.

OS X Mountain Lion - Apple Store (U.S.)

Am I confused here?

Thanks again guys, we're on the right track, appreciate it.
 
Joined
Oct 16, 2010
Messages
15,138
Reaction score
599
Points
113
Location
Brentwood Bay, BC, Canada
Bottom line is you usually get what you paid for and need, but Apple changed their OS X upgrade pricing policy with Mavericks 10.9.x that they pulled, and Yosemite 10.10.x.

Depending on what you need or use I'd suggest Snow Leopard 10.6.8 as a minimum ( no builtin speech dictation) and Mountain Lion 10.8.x as tops (both $20.00 from Apple) ,unless you have iDevices or need some features of Yosemite 10.10.x which is pushing your Mac, and regardless, your existing 2GB RAM for either is considered too little for proper use and I'd suggest upgrading to more whatever you do.

But as mentioned, you can upgrade to 6GB RAM memory. For more specks check:
MacBook "Core 2 Duo" 2.13 13" (White-09) Specs (Mid-2009, MC240LL/A, MacBook5,2, A1181, 2330) @ EveryMac.com

PS: "Precious things aren't found in heaps" — Author unknown
and maybe the old "you get what you pay for" adage holds true. ;)
 
Last edited:
OP
E

Engage

Guest
Thanks guys. I went ahead and bought Mountain Lion, great suggestion. I thought they were going to mail me a CD, but they're apparently too cheap to do so.

So I've got this obtuse Mac App Store thing to do, with passwords, and PDF's, and multiple emails, a real CIA operation etc.

No where in any of the info barrage they sent me do they tell me what will happen when I download from the Mac App Store.

Will I get an actual installer?

Or will the Mac App Store try to overwrite Snow Leopard with Mountain Lion, something I wish to avoid at all costs, as I REALLY do not trust that process.

Thanks much for doing Apple's job for them, appreciate it guys.
 

pigoo3

Well-known member
Staff member
Admin
Joined
May 20, 2008
Messages
43,396
Reaction score
1,000
Points
113
Location
U.S.
Your Mac's Specs
2011 17" MBP 2.2ghz, 16gig ram, OS 10.11.6
I went ahead and bought Mountain Lion, great suggestion. I thought they were going to mail me a CD, but they're apparently too cheap to do so.

You should probably do a little bit of homework before typing out such a provocative statement…and give Apple a break.;) Mountain Lion was NEVER available on CD/disc.

Mountain Lion (10.8), Mavericks (10.9), and Yosemite (10.10) have been download-only OS versions. And Lion (OS 10.7)…was never available on CD…but was available on USB stick (but the majority of folks downloaded it).

You can make yourself a bootable Mountain Lion USB stick if you would like (do an internet search for instructions).

Also. Because Mountain Lion is a download only OS version. If you were in a hurry…you would CERTAINLY be able to download it a LOT FASTER than having a CD delivered to you via "snail-mail"!;)

- Nick
 
Joined
Oct 16, 2010
Messages
15,138
Reaction score
599
Points
113
Location
Brentwood Bay, BC, Canada


Will I get an actual installer?

Or will the Mac App Store try to overwrite Snow Leopard with Mountain Lion, something I wish to avoid at all costs, as I REALLY do not trust that process.


Just make sure you have a cloned backup of Snow Leopard — just in case.

Carbon Copy Cloner works well. ;)

Or your choice...
 
OP
E

Engage

Guest
You should probably do a little bit of homework before typing out such a provocative statement…and give Apple a break.;) Mountain Lion was NEVER available on CD/disc.

Ok, so Apple's been cheap for a long time, alright, I get it, and stand corrected. :)

Check this out Nick....

https://www.google.com/search?q=apple+profits&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

US technology giant Apple has reported the biggest quarterly profit ever made by a public company. Apple reported a net profit of $18bn (£11.8bn) in its fiscal first quarter, which tops the $15.9bn made by ExxonMobil in the second quarter of 2012, according to Standard and Poor's.

And yet they can't afford to put their software on CDs.

You can make yourself a bootable Mountain Lion USB stick if you would like (do an internet search for instructions).

Right, so instead of getting a CD installer for my $20, I can buy a USB stick, learn how to make a bootable installer, and do the work, all which will cost me more in time and money than the cost of the actual software.

You've made my point better than I could have.
Apple is shifting their job from them to us.

Nick, it would have been more helpful if you'd been able to answer my actual question. I realize you may just not know, and that's cool. Thanks for trying.
 
OP
E

Engage

Guest
Just make sure you have a cloned backup of Snow Leopard — just in case.

Carbon Copy Cloner works well. ;)

Or your choice...

I use SuperDuper, but I hear CCC is great, been meaning to try it.

I guess what I need to do is access the Mac App Store from a back up copy of my setup. That way, if the Mac App Store tries to overwrite my OS I can just trash the whole thing, demand my money back, rebuild the back up, and waste even more time.

If the Mac App Stores gives me an installer file, then I'll shut up and get back to work. :)

Thanks for trying guys. Sorry to rant.
 
Joined
Oct 16, 2010
Messages
15,138
Reaction score
599
Points
113
Location
Brentwood Bay, BC, Canada

… … …
Right, so instead of getting a CD installer for my $20, I can buy a USB stick, learn how to make a bootable installer, and do the work, all which will cost me more in time and money than the cost of the actual software.
...


Hmmm…??? I think you're jumping into the deep end of the pool here when you're barely able to swim. ;D

You don't need to do any of those things or spend any more money, and they were just suggestions made to help you if needed.

Heck, for your OS X installer, just make and keep a copy somewhere before you run the install. And it won't cost you a penny more. :D

Or you could just stay where you are with Snow Leopard and purchase a copy of Dragon Dictation etc., but don't forget that the recommended microphone may cost a bit more. We wouldn't want to have you wasting your money and having all those companies making a profit from your purchases. Gheese no!! ;D
 

pigoo3

Well-known member
Staff member
Admin
Joined
May 20, 2008
Messages
43,396
Reaction score
1,000
Points
113
Location
U.S.
Your Mac's Specs
2011 17" MBP 2.2ghz, 16gig ram, OS 10.11.6
Ok, so Apple's been cheap for a long time, alright, I get it, and stand corrected. :)

Right, so instead of getting a CD installer for my $20, I can buy a USB stick, learn how to make a bootable installer, and do the work, all which will cost me more in time and money than the cost of the actual software.

You've made my point better than I could have.
Apple is shifting their job from them to us.

I'm sorry…but you're so far "off the map" with these comments that I'm not even going to attempt to explain how the computing world has changed since OS 10.6 (the last Mac OS to come on disc).

Are you even aware that Apple computers no longer come with CD/DVD drives anymore…and haven't for at least the last 2+ years??

- Nick

p.s. With one exception. Apple is still selling one old 2012 13" MacBook Pro model with an optical drive (and I'm sure Apple will stop selling this soon).
 
OP
E

Engage

Guest
Here's the thing guys.

When ever anybody challenges Apple about anything on any Apple forum, all the Apple Fan Boys jump out of the bushes and start going adamant about why Apple is always right and the user is always wrong etc etc.

It's automated semi-religious worship of the Mother Ship reflex that makes real conversations about real issues difficult. Such reflexes are actually not supportive of Apple at all, as such "don't think different" theology inflates the growing complacency in Apple culture which will eventually turn Apple in the next Microsoft.

As example, somebody is very anxious to tell me I am so very wrong because Apple doesn't make CD drives anymore etc. An automated "the user is always wrong" reflex.

But guess what dude, the OS software I just purchased was designed for machines that came with CD drives. I didn't just purchase Yosemite, I just purchased Mountain Lion, software for machines that have CD drives.

But, anyway, no worries. It matters not. Every post I write on any topic will now be wrong, Wrong, WRONG, because I have proven myself to be a blaspheming heretic. :)

Perhaps I'll try another religion for a bit....
 
Joined
Oct 16, 2010
Messages
15,138
Reaction score
599
Points
113
Location
Brentwood Bay, BC, Canada
Sorry Engage, but I think you're over the top and please don't include me as an Apple Fan Boy, and those that know me will let you know that I'm anything but.

But I fail to see any Apple Fan Boy type posts here, but just facts as they are — nothing Apple Fan Boyish about that and nothing much any can do about it anyway, except to provide some feedback to Apple which you can certainly do rather than blowing stuff out here.

I'm sorry you can't seem to see the reality of things that you want to suit to some form of fantasy thinking you have for the way you think it should be. But I sure hope you have a different view of the real world around you or you're going to have some trouble with life — and that would just be a waste.

Please, try and have a Good Day and accept life and the world as it is. And yes, some of it could sure be improved. ;D
 

pigoo3

Well-known member
Staff member
Admin
Joined
May 20, 2008
Messages
43,396
Reaction score
1,000
Points
113
Location
U.S.
Your Mac's Specs
2011 17" MBP 2.2ghz, 16gig ram, OS 10.11.6
Here's the thing guys.

When ever anybody challenges Apple about anything on any Apple forum, all the Apple Fan Boys jump out of the bushes and start going adamant about why Apple is always right and the user is always wrong etc etc.

It's automated semi-religious worship of the Mother Ship reflex that makes real conversations about real issues difficult. Such reflexes are actually not supportive of Apple at all, as such "don't think different" theology inflates the growing complacency in Apple culture which will eventually turn Apple in the next Microsoft.

As example, somebody is very anxious to tell me I am so very wrong because Apple doesn't make CD drives anymore etc. An automated "the user is always wrong" reflex.

But guess what dude, the OS software I just purchased was designed for machines that came with CD drives. I didn't just purchase Yosemite, I just purchased Mountain Lion, software for machines that have CD drives.

What you're doing is…creating a scenario that makes your line of thinking make sense. When you are absolutely wrong…VERY OUT OF TOUCH…or at least very very confused.:(

As to your logic that Mountain Lion was designed for machines that came with CD drives. PLEASE READ THE FOLLOWING STATEMENT CAREFULLY. When Mountain Lion was released…most Macintosh computers sold still had a CD/DVD drive). Yet Mountain Lion was a download only OS. So your logic here makes no sense.

As to the "fan-boy" comments. Obviously your comments were referring to my statements…and you are just blindly assuming that I am a "fan-boy" (which is not true at all).

I agree with you...I wish Apple was still distributing OS upgrades on disc. But Apple isn't. So you (we) have to be flexible…and stop belly-aching like little children!;) The alternative is to create a bootable USB drive of the OS installer (Mountain Lion in this case).

What you also do not realize is…with OS versions AFTER 10.6…the OS installer creates a "Recovery Partition" on the HD…which you can always boot into just like booting from an OS CD/DVD. Also…if for some reason someones hard drive dies (with an OS install of 10.7 or later)…you can use "Internet Recovery" to install the OS on a new replacement HD.

Again. Stop creating scenarios/excuses to make your obsolete way of thinking correct. Apple has changed things. It's not about Apple being "lazy"…or about Apple being "cheap"…it's about change!

And please don't make incorrect assumptions that just because someone doesn't agree with you that automatically they are an Apple "fan-boy".

- I can give you a LONG LIST of things I don't like that Apple has done over the years…and has done recently.
- AND…I can give you a LONG LIST of good things Apple has done over the years…and has done recently.

This is called "objective thinking" or "objective criticism". Not being a "fan-boy"!!!

- Nick
 
Last edited:
OP
E

Engage

Guest
Guys,

First a thank you for suggesting Mountain Lion. I don't know yet if it will work for me, but it does seem the best thing to try.

Next, an apology for calling you apple fan boys. While I do think there is some automated rejection going on here, that is such a normal part of forum culture that it can not be used as evidence of religious devotion to Apple. I would have to read many more of your posts to conclude that, so I was wrong, and I apologize.

Finally, the Mac App Store is the most retarded method of distributing software ever invented.

Go ahead and yell at me if you wish, no problem, but it will have no effect.

Here's how software distribution usually works, because this is what makes sense.

You give your payment info to vendor, and they give you a link to download software.

Simple, and immediate.

Here's how Apple's system works.

You login to Apple store and pay.

A few days later you get two emails and a PDF. The delay erases any benefit of digital download.

You have to read both emails, and the PDF, and figure out which of the THREE different code numbers go where.

Then you have to login, again, to the Mac App Store. Then you have to search for the product, again.

Just as with the emails and PDF, the Mac App Store does not tell you what you are downloading, or where it is going. Is this an automated upgrade process, or will you get an actual installer you can run where ever you wish? Apple can't be bothered to tell you.

Once the download starts, there is no progress bar presented. I found it by accident by digging around in new pages in the Mac App Store.

An hour later, you get this message.

"This software can not be installed on this machine".

Of course this test could have been done at the beginning of the hour instead of the end, but then it wouldn't be an Apple project.

And BTW, the sales page very clearly says my Mac is qualified for this software.

So, in conclusion, I was wrong to yell at you guys, even if you are apple fan boys. My apologies.

But I remain firmly convinced Apple is continuing a long slide in to mediocrity, and that a mindless devotion to Apple by some is helping to accelerate that process. Whether you are part of that group I am not qualified to say.

I am very clearly not an expert on all things Apple. But I have been using them 20 years, am a programmer myself, and have built and sold a net start up for significant dollars.

Point being, if I'm struggling with Apple's software distribution system, you can bet that that Apple's main target market, the average non-nerd consumer, is too.

Again, this problem is so easily solved.

You pay.

And then you get a download link.

Everybody else online knows how to do this already.

Ok, end of rant, and sorry again for my less constructive contributions. I'm gone now, and off to shop for Windows machines.
 
Joined
Oct 16, 2010
Messages
15,138
Reaction score
599
Points
113
Location
Brentwood Bay, BC, Canada
Wow!! You sure seem to be encountering some problems with the App Store and your purchases, the likes of which I have never encountered or even know of anyone who has. Not even close!!

As a 20+ user/programmer, just maybe you're trying to do it YOUR WAY, rather than how you should be doing it. And to help you with that, may I suggest you start reading as to how it works and you could start here:
Mac App Store: How to browse and purchase from the Mac App Store - Apple Support

Do you even have a current Apple ID and a method of payment setup for your account?
If neither of those exist, yes you will probably have some trouble and delays.

Have success with you Windows machine, but you do know don't you that you could just use your Mac for that, and you can even use either Windows method and still shop at the App Store. Apple makes it quite easy — if you follow their directions. And hey, they even provide a fair bit of Windows software, and don't even charge you for it. ;)

But, you're right, the App Store is not perfect.
 
OP
E

Engage

Guest
Wow!! You sure seem to be encountering some problems with the App Store and your purchases, the likes of which I have never encountered or even know of anyone who has. Not even close!!

Yes, this is "the user is always wrong" apple culture philosophy. I've seen this a million times over 20 years. Example...

Back during the Mavericks fiasco I watched sadly as user after user after user, a new one every hour, showed up on various Mac forums to report various Mavericks install calamities. And the apple fan boys always swarmed them to tell them that the poor user was totally at fault, and Mavericks was great.

And then I found a thread by an Apple programmer who was working on Mavericks. He was very apologetic, and explained that Mavericks had been released with KNOWN BUGS and that he and others were working hard on nailing things down. He seemed like such a good guy, I felt bad for him being put in that position by the business people up the chain at Apple.

I pointed out his post in a number of threads, and it had no effect on anything. The religious dogma chanting continued without pause, a testament to the genius of the Apple marketing team, bowing to them.

So whether you personally are an apple fan boy or not I do not know. But this is essentially what I see you doing, at least in this particular thread.

As a 20+ user/programmer, just maybe you're trying to do it YOUR WAY,

What's frustrating about posts like yours is that they are so easy to defeat it's not fun.

It's NOT my way silly, it's the way the vast majority of software on the net is sold and delivered.

You pay your money, you get a download link to an actual installer.

Simple.

You know this already, but you're ignoring it, because perhaps you can't grasp that Apple can actually be wrong sometimes?

And to help you with that, may I suggest you start reading as to how it works and you could start here:

May I suggest that perhaps you don't actually understand what the Mac is about? The whole point from the very beginning was to make software that "just works". The whole point was to serve millions of average everyday non-nerd consumers, who don't spend all day every day on Mac forums.

Thus, convoluted install procedures which are far more complicated than what is available a million other places is NOT what the Mac experience is supposed to be. That's the Windows experience you're thinking of.

Point being, if users have to read a big bunch of crap just to download software, it's a failure by Apple. Case in point, as you probably know, here's what you have to do to create the bootable installer Apple won't create for you.

Create Bootable Copies of OS X Mountain Lion Installer

Four pages, and about 50 steps. What in the ^%$# world does this have to do with the Mac experience??? Nothing, that's what.

Do you even have a current Apple ID and a method of payment setup for your account?

Yes, I bought the software already.

Apologies, I know you have good intentions, and I thank you for that. And I'm guessing you know many technical details about the Mac, for which you have my respect.

But when it comes to the bigger picture of the Mac, you just don't know what you're talking about. And you're helping to make things worse by rationalizing Apple's descent in to mediocrity.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Shop Amazon


Shop for your Apple, Mac, iPhone and other computer products on Amazon.
We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon and affiliated sites.
Top