Time Machine and iCloud

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Is it possible for the files I keep on iCloud to be backed -up on my iMac's Time Machine?
 

chscag

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When you open your Finder, do you have a folder named "iCloud Drive" that shows up in the side bar? If you do, it will be backed up by Time Machine assuming you do not leave it out of your backup. Doing a full Time Machine backup will backup everything including the iCloud Drive folder.
 
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Thanks very much for this. I think it's doing what it should now. I guess I may have been at fault as if nothing's changed on a file then Time Machine won't take me back. I was assuming it would.
 

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When you open your Finder, do you have a folder named "iCloud Drive" that shows up in the side bar? If you do, it will be backed up by Time Machine assuming you do not leave it out of your backup. Doing a full Time Machine backup will backup everything including the iCloud Drive folder.
Quick question - what is the location of the iCloud Drive folder? I can't seem to find it on my drive and I'm wondering if it just mirrors the names of files on iCloud.
 
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MacInWin

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I guess I may have been at fault as if nothing's changed on a file then Time Machine won't take me back. I was assuming it would.
Can you explain what you mean by that? The way TM works is the first time it runs it makes a complete backup. Also, if you add a drive to the backup list as chscag suggested, then the first time TM runs after that it makes a full backup of that new drive. So if nothing changes to a file after that backup, then TM won't make a new copy, but you can go back to that original backup. For example, if file.a is backed up by TM, then you accidentally delete it, or it gets mangled, then you can go into TM and recover file.a from before it was deleted, even if the only copy in TM was the original backup.
 

chscag

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I can't seem to find it on my drive and I'm wondering if it just mirrors the names of files on iCloud.

It does that, but apparently is included in a Time Machine backup only if there is actually something stored on the iCloud drive. I tested this with iCloud, Dropbox, and OneDrive and they seem to work the same way.
 

vansmith

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So, it does save files locally (which makes sense). I'm just curious now as to where on the HD the files are stored.

Wait, I just found the answer from Ars' always wonderful OS X reviews:
As it turns out, everything is still under ~/Library/Mobile Documents/ in obscurely named subdirectories, but the careful subterfuge emphasizes Apple’s desire to keep iCloud Drive abstract. It is not just “a folder that syncs.” It’s not a folder at all; it’s “iCloud.”
So, it looks like it works like Dropbox/OneDrive/etc by using a regular folder and watching it but does so without any user choice of location (which, for most, probably isn't an issue).
 
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Well this certainly has started a bit of a discussion, which I guess is the whole point. Thank-you everybody for your contributions, I would like to say that I understand all of what's said but you guys are on a different competence plane to me so I can't, but I get the gist.
I have actually started to move away from iCloud and I'm trialling something called Chronosync which was recommended by another post. I use it to connect and sync the files etc. I need when I'm working away (iMac in office, Macbook Air when away). This means I have a selected file back-up on my Air and I can rely on Time Machine on a separate drive to do a full back up on both machines. Two birds - one stone springs to mind. Any comments or opinions would be really useful. Once again, Thx
 
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Hi I'm new to this forum, and this thread answered my question spot on, I was just looking for confirmation of how icloud drive worked. Question for last poster though, why move from icloud to chronosync? I am starting to use the icloud drive for exactly that purpose, ie all file up to date on imac in office and new macbook in the field. Auto sync via icloud (drive) and version on imac backed up regularly via time machine. Couldn't be easier?
 
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chas_m

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Let's clarify a few things:

1. iCloud is great (and about to get better ... see below), but it is a very limited amount of space. By default, you get 5GB of free space. That's TONS if all you want to keep synced is a packet of documents. Not so much, though beyond something basic like that. You can buy more space (I have 20GB for 99 cents per month for example), but it's still pretty tiny compared to a hard drive. But this depends on your needs.

2. ChronoSync has nothing to do with cloud services. It can (using ChronoAgent) keep remote hard drives in sync across the Internet or on a local network. It can sync the entire drive, or just selected bits. Space is never an issue, because you're syncing to a hard drive of (presumably) at least the same capacity as your own.

3. Apple is about to add iCloud Drive-only files to Time Machine's ability to backup, as well as some other features:

OS X 10.10.2 will integrate iCloud Drive content into Time Machine | MacNN
 
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I see your point re the use of iCloud, so why would I want to use Chronosync. There's the capacity issues listed in the last post, which is less of an issue for me. The main reason in internet connectivity. Living and sometimes working rural areas means unreliable access. Extend this to planes airports and trains and it becomes a more serious issue. I've fallen foul of using an airport's "free" access only to be blitzed by so much spam. Never go down that route again. I think as connectivity becomes more reliable, trustworthy and widespread and the iCloud drive develops, then I might switch back, but in the meantime, Chronosync does it for me.
 
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Hey chas_m, now your confusing me!. What do you mean by icloud -drive only files? that seams to contradict chsag, who states icould drive is backed up to time machine! That is the crux of my initial enquiry. If you move a file from documents to icloud-drive will time machine see it. I could prove it for myself but thought it would be easier to scan the forums. Now there are 2 senior guys on here, appearing to say the exact opposite!

I agree icloud-drive is not a back up, it can not be because if you inadvertently delete a file on your machine and you have internet connection, it is immediately deleted on all your other drives, so not a back up.

Jamiefort, I think you are mistaken. icloud-drive holds a copy on your local drive so you have it when no internet. This is what I am using it for. Modify a file and save it. As soon as you get an internet connection the mod is uploaded to the cloud and down to your other devices, really neat. icloud-drive is not just storing your master documents in the cloud, which I agree is useless unless you have a 100% reliable internet connection, which in the wilds of Wales on customers sites I don't.

5GB is a limit for sure, but I can hold several years worth of customers reports, contacts, British standards, European standards etc etc no trouble at all. The cost of going to 20GB is trivial. Agree this wont work if your tying to edit hi def films or carry an up to date portfolio of several thousands photos, but i don't think thats what icloud-drive is intended for.

Role on 10.10.2, beacause if its as improved as 10.10.1 was over 10.10 (which i think microsoft did quality control for) I cant wait.

Syncing disks across the internet has a totally different appeal, and I may well look into that for what amounts to disaster recovery of my backup drive....
 
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vansmith

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You might be interested in the 10.10.2 update which addresses your issue (see here).
 

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