My MacBook has Malware

Joined
Mar 14, 2015
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Points
1
My Macbook has Malware and is so very slow. What do I do? There are times lately I feel like taking a hammer to it. Help?
 

Raz0rEdge

Well-known member
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jul 17, 2009
Messages
14,278
Reaction score
934
Points
113
Location
MA
Your Mac's Specs
2022 Mac Studio, macOS Monterrey, 32 GB
How do you know you have malware? Being slow does not equate to bad software. What Mac do you have? What apps are you running? How much memory do you have? How much disk space do you have?

Have you use Activity Monitor to track CPU and memory usage as you are using your machine? When did the problems start? What did you do around that time?
 
OP
C
Joined
Mar 14, 2015
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Points
1
When I tried to log into facebook it told me that I had Malware and would not let me do anything until I agreed that I would get it fixed.
 

pigoo3

Well-known member
Staff member
Admin
Joined
May 20, 2008
Messages
43,427
Reaction score
1,015
Points
113
Location
U.S.
Your Mac's Specs
2011 17" MBP 2.2ghz, 16gig ram, OS 10.11.6
My MacBook Pro was kind of slow this afternoon. I ran the maintenance app called "Onyx"…and it's much better now!:)

- Nick
 

Raz0rEdge

Well-known member
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jul 17, 2009
Messages
14,278
Reaction score
934
Points
113
Location
MA
Your Mac's Specs
2022 Mac Studio, macOS Monterrey, 32 GB
When I tried to log into facebook it told me that I had Malware and would not let me do anything until I agreed that I would get it fixed.

Ahh, being told you have malware from the browser is the FIRST indication that you don't have it but rather are being duped into thinking you do and being asked for money.

So first, depending on your browser, clear all history, cookies, cache. Next install the extensions Adblock, Flashblock and Ghostery. Lastly, grab Adware Medic and run that to get rid of whatever is on your system.

That will take care of the "malware" issue. As far as slowness goes, answer my other questions and we'll deal with that separately..
 
OP
C
Joined
Mar 14, 2015
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Ahh, being told you have malware from the browser is the FIRST indication that you don't have it but rather are being duped into thinking you do and being asked for money.

So first, depending on your browser, clear all history, cookies, cache. Next install the extensions Adblock, Flashblock and Ghostery. Lastly, grab Adware Medic and run that to get rid of whatever is on your system.

That will take care of the "malware" issue. As far as slowness goes, answer my other questions and we'll deal with that separately..

Thank you for the advice. I have to get to work for now but I will do all these steps and report back with the other information. Thank you for your help. My ex used to take care of the macbook but I started working on it on my own and I really do not always have the knowledge. I am glad I found this place. Thanks again!
 
Joined
Nov 5, 2014
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Points
1
My recomendations

I would back up any data you have on an external HD. Time Machine works wonders for this. Get a thumb drive 8 gb or more and create an installer jump drive with either 10.10.X or 10.9.5. Perform a clean install and try not to download from torrent sites or when you do just create a clone of your system before hand. This way if malware happens, you can revert your computer back to a normal state.

google on how to do each of these things. There is too much documentation out there already for me to explain.
 

Raz0rEdge

Well-known member
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jul 17, 2009
Messages
14,278
Reaction score
934
Points
113
Location
MA
Your Mac's Specs
2022 Mac Studio, macOS Monterrey, 32 GB
I would back up any data you have on an external HD. Time Machine works wonders for this. Get a thumb drive 8 gb or more and create an installer jump drive with either 10.10.X or 10.9.5. Perform a clean install and try not to download from torrent sites or when you do just create a clone of your system before hand. This way if malware happens, you can revert your computer back to a normal state.

google on how to do each of these things. There is too much documentation out there already for me to explain.

Before heading down the "scorched earth" approach, its first good to get all the details about the users computer and where the issues are.
 
Joined
Feb 14, 2004
Messages
4,781
Reaction score
166
Points
63
Location
Groves, Texas
Your Mac's Specs
21in. iMac 10.11 --- HP Linux Mint 18
It's not always necessary to "nuke and pave". Usually it's easier to just fix the problem.
 
Joined
Nov 5, 2014
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Points
1
It's not always necessary to "nuke and pave". Usually it's easier to just fix the problem.

Sorry coming from a more professional work flow background.

The way I use computers is as a working machine. All information that is important like images and docs should be stored on an external HD or not the boot drive. Corruption, virus, or malware will effect the boot drive most likely making it easier to just "nuke" - esp. when you have made your monolithic clone which takes all of 7 minutes to deploy. Im just saying - save yourself the head ache in the long run.

Since my last post you could have wiped the drive and deployed your clone and been on with your life.
 
Joined
Feb 14, 2004
Messages
4,781
Reaction score
166
Points
63
Location
Groves, Texas
Your Mac's Specs
21in. iMac 10.11 --- HP Linux Mint 18
True, but then you wouldn't have learned exactly what was wrong, what caused it, or how to fix it.
Not everyone has the resources like multiple drives and clone software. And malware on the Macintosh is not the same as on a windows machine where nuke and pave is the norm.
 
Joined
Nov 5, 2014
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Points
1
True, but then you wouldn't have learned exactly what was wrong, what caused it, or how to fix it.
Not everyone has the resources like multiple drives and clone software. And malware on the Macintosh is not the same as on a windows machine where nuke and pave is the norm.

That is a good point.
 
Joined
Oct 16, 2010
Messages
15,157
Reaction score
601
Points
113
Location
Brentwood Bay, BC, Canada
It's not always necessary to "nuke and pave". Usually it's easier to just fix the problem.

+1!!!!

The N&P "nuke and pave" method seems to be recommended and suggested much too often for a "fix", and not all of the negative consequences of doing so are often mentioned.
 

Rod


Joined
Jun 12, 2011
Messages
7,962
Reaction score
726
Points
113
Location
Melbourne, Australia and Ubud, Bali, Indonesia
Your Mac's Specs
2015 MacBook Pro Retina 13" macOS 11.1, iPhone SE 2, iPad 6, Apple Watch SE.
I agree that N&P is not a learning experience just a process. I prefer to empower users by giving them tools and teaching them how to use them. Adware Medic for example makes you aware of commonly found adware like "Spigot" and "Buca Apps" which means any time a user comes across this adware which might be in the form of say a browser extension alarm bells start ringing and they know what they are dealing with and/or at least have a clue about what to do about it. ;)
 
Joined
Nov 5, 2014
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Points
1
When I tried to log into facebook it told me that I had Malware and would not let me do anything until I agreed that I would get it fixed.

Also a large concern here is that you may have compromised your Facebook password. A lot of phishing sites use this method by acting as if it was the Facebook log in and are able to record your username and password.

pro tip: always check the address bar in your web browser if suspect something "phishy". it should always

Also a good measure is to change your passwords immediately after such events.
 

Shop Amazon


Shop for your Apple, Mac, iPhone and other computer products on Amazon.
We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon and affiliated sites.
Top