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Lifting and closing my MacBook Pro 13

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I have a MacBook Pro 13 mid 2010 and so far it has given superb service. Just recently I have found that when I lift the top to open it I have to hold the main body to stop it lifting and when I close it to sleep mode the top will 'spring' back so that it is open by about 1/2" or slightly less.

I am concerned that this is the start of a problem and is there a simple cure for the problem. I am more than reluctant to start squirting lubricants into the hinge mechanism! So if anyone knows a cure for this I would be very thankful!
 

chscag

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I believe in order to get that back to its normal working, it may require changing the hinges. I'm not sure if that's something you want to do or just live with the problem. I certainly would not try to use any kind of lubricant as that may cause more problems and possibly ruin your MacBook Pro.

The folks at iFixit: The Free Repair Manual have a procedure for changing the hinges. I know you're handy with fixing things. Take a look at what they say.
 
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I've had a quick look through there Chas, thank you. It should only take about 10 minutes and be a dead easy job :eek::eek::eek:

Well, it is nice to drean isn't it? I will have a good look at the procedure and the costing. At quick look at the latter makes them inexpensive and I have got my watch makers 4 lb hammer :Cool:

Just as a matter of interest Chas it was my twisted sense of humour when I mentioned lubricating it 'onest.
 

chscag

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Okay John, let us know how it went. :)
 
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I am concerned that this is the start of a problem and is there a simple cure for the problem. I am more than reluctant to start squirting lubricants into the hinge mechanism! So if anyone knows a cure for this I would be very thankful!

Yeah right, I really don't think WD-40 is going to fix that problem. :Smirk:

Are you sure that the problem isn't being caused by a swollen battery??

Does your MBPro sit flat and not wobble or rock on a flat surface???




- Patrick
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The fix for this is much simpler than replacing the hinges.
What you do is remove the screws to the 2 hinges while the screen is in the most open position.
Unplug the screen from all related wiring.
Remove the screen from the top case.
Grab the hinges and open them all the way.
If they look dirty/dusty- clean them. Using a bit of lube doesn't hurt.
Then close the hinges past the original open position when you first removed the screws(this isn't real technical. You don't need to be exact).
After all that, put it back together.
The spring tension should now be reset and allow you to close the screen like normal.
 
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After all that, put it back together.
The spring tension should now be reset and allow you to close the screen like normal.

That sounds pretty reasonable and makes sense for a fix.



- Patrick
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pigoo3

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I have a MacBook Pro 13 mid 2010 and so far it has given superb service.
"So far..." You've gotten 10 years out of it...you should be happier than a "pig in mud"! Lol

How many more years you expecting out of it?:)

- Nick
 
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Patrick, It doesn't wobble when put on a flat surface, but I do at times :'(

iggibar I assume that I would follow the same, or similar, procedure as the hinge change? What you suggest sounds like total logic. The MBP has been treated very well in its life but as I know from long experience dust and dirt gets in everywhere eventually. especially in moving parts like hinges.

Nick, I really like this model with the inputs it has, so why not another ten years. Anyway, it's only 9 1/2 years so far :giggle:giggle

Once again folks thank you for all of the suggestions !
 
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iggibar I assume that I would follow the same, or similar, procedure as the hinge change? What you suggest sounds like total logic. The MBP has been treated very well in its life but as I know from long experience dust and dirt gets in everywhere eventually. especially in moving parts like hinges.
Yes, it's pretty much the same path you take to remove the hinge, but you don't need to take it completely off. The hinge will still be attached to the screen, but not to the lower chassis.I've gotten in the habit of putting a small drop of gun lube I have(Hoppes#9 lubricating oil), but any lube/oil will work just fine as long as it turn into a dust magnet.
 
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I've gotten in the habit of putting a small drop of gun lube I have(Hoppes#9 lubricating oil), but any lube/oil will work just fine as long as it turn into a dust magnet.

Any of the handy sewing machine or men's beard shaver lubricating oils should work fine, and most have a handy application nozzle.

But I forget, I guess most Americans have some sort of gun oils on hand these days. :Smirk:


PS: Maybe one of the "Dry Lubes" available these days might be better and be even less of a dust magnet???






- Patrick
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- - - Updated - - -

Not the gin Sue, but we have just had a delivery, I wish !

That's a beautiful shot!!!





- Patrick
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chscag

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But I forget, I guess most Americans have some sort of gun oils on hand these days.
Apparently so did one Canadian in Nova Scotia. :wink
 
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Just a quick, overdue, update.

I still haven't got around to changing the hinges, BUT, since the temperatures have risen, 32ºC here today, the lid has been opening and closing perfectly well :Smirk:

So, I will wait until they drop again and see what happens? I have the new hinges, so if they do need changing I have a good range of calibrated watchmakers hammers from 4lbs down to 2oz so no problems expected :Cool::Confused:
 
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I have the new hinges, so if they do need changing I have a good range of calibrated watchmakers hammers from 4lbs down to 2oz so no problems expected

If those aren't enough, You could get what they refer to as a Harley Wrench!!! :D

ie: If the hammer is not big enough, or the part does not move, get a bigger hammer, also known as a Harley Wrench.




- Patrick
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I know. You could do it standing on yer head. well, you lot down there will be used to doing just that init already.

And the proper expression is "don't force it, use a bigger hammer"

I even know the correct torque fro the screws and it works every time.

Up to shear and back a quarter!

Talking about torque. Did you know that when an engine was changed in a Bristol Britannia aircrft the 4 bolts holding the engine were tightened using a hydraulic spanner. The bolts were hollow and had a small rod welded inside them with a loose washer on the open end. The washer was turned as the bolt was tightened and the correct torque was shown when the bolt had stretched and the washer was just tight and couldn't be moved. They were once only bolts and had to be thrown away when the engine was changed again.

Not-a-lot-a-people-know-that.
 
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