Internet Browser

Joined
Nov 17, 2014
Messages
9
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Which is a good browser for my Mac to use along with Safari

Firefox, Google Chrome or Internet Explorer 9
 
C

chas_m

Guest
Without any clue as to why you think you need one, it's pretty hard to make a recommendation. Firefox is the second most-popular browser for the Mac, but I hate the way it updates every 20-30 minutes (only slightly exaggerating).

Chrome is a Google data-mining tool disguised as a browser.
 

vansmith

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2008
Messages
19,924
Reaction score
558
Points
113
Location
Queensland
Your Mac's Specs
Mini (2014, 2018, 2020), MBA (2020), iPad Pro (2018), iPhone 13 Pro Max, Watch (S6)
IE isn't available for OS X so that makes that choice easy. ;)

Chrome is a fine browser which, contrary to Chas' suggestion, does not mine for your data (given the lack of evidence to support such a claim). Firefox is fine as well; it's not quite as Mac friendly as Safari or Chrome (both of which use native toolkits in OS X) but it is equally supported across platforms.
 
C

chas_m

Guest
If Chrome does not mine user data:

a) what's Google interest in making it? 96 percent of their income comes from advertising that relies on tracked data.

b) Why does Firefox actively advertise itself as being more secure than Chrome?

c) Why are there several variations of the Chrome browser that say they specifically remove/disable the tracking components (example: SRware Iron)?

It appears to me that the only evidence you'd accept is an admission from Google that they do this. Have you served on any grand juries lately by chance? :)
 

vansmith

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2008
Messages
19,924
Reaction score
558
Points
113
Location
Queensland
Your Mac's Specs
Mini (2014, 2018, 2020), MBA (2020), iPad Pro (2018), iPhone 13 Pro Max, Watch (S6)
a) what's Google interest in making it? 96 percent of their income comes from advertising that relies on tracked data.
From a Chrome developer:
People never seem to understand why Google builds Chrome no matter how many times I try to pound it into their heads. It's very simple: the primary goal of Chrome is to make the web advance as much and as quickly as possible. That's it.

b) Why does Firefox actively advertise itself as being more secure than Chrome?
Security is not the same thing as privacy.

c) Why are there several variations of the Chrome browser that say they specifically remove/disable the tracking components (example: SRware Iron)?
They can remove all they wish but all Chrome records are unique (and destroyed) identifiers. Unless you've got proof that they mine user data that is identifiable, you haven't got much to go on. Secondly, SRWare Iron is a terrible example. By their own admission, they pick on two things: " [Chrome] creating a unique user ID or the submission of entries to Google to generate suggestions." The unique user ID - absolutely that's made but it's not identifiable and done to track installs. Is that bad? It's a little invasive but hardly worthy of your attempt to sensationalize what's happening. Second, the submission of entries for search suggestions? That's hardly unique since every browser does it.

It appears to me that the only evidence you'd accept is an admission from Google that they do this.
No, I rely on evidence that user identifiable data is mined and since that hasn't come out (this would be huge news), it's hard to believe.
Have you served on any grand juries lately by chance? :)
...what?
 
M

MacInWin

Guest
For the OP, I see no reason for any other browser than Safari. It works, it works well, and it's reliable. If you have a need for another browser, let us know what that specific need is and maybe there is another browser that fits.

As for the Google discussion, I have systematically removed ALL google products from all of my systems. I, like cha_m, have see how Google tracks everything you do, and I don't want them to do that. If you don't really think google tracks, get Ghostery and turn it on, pretty much every website has google trackers embedded.
 

vansmith

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2008
Messages
19,924
Reaction score
558
Points
113
Location
Queensland
Your Mac's Specs
Mini (2014, 2018, 2020), MBA (2020), iPad Pro (2018), iPhone 13 Pro Max, Watch (S6)
If you don't really think google tracks, get Ghostery and turn it on, pretty much every website has google trackers embedded.
Absolutely this is the case but this isn't really Google's fault; you can't blame Google for web developers who want to track their own users. In some respects, this is would be like blaming Apple if someone used "Find my Mac" to figure out where you lived. ;)
 
M

MacInWin

Guest
But "Find My Mac" is not a data mining tool. If someone used it to figure out where I live, it would take some intervention and network penetration to get that data. On the other hand, pretty much everything Google makes is designed to report back to the mothership on how, where and when it's being used. And for that I do blame Google, they designed it that way.
 

vansmith

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2008
Messages
19,924
Reaction score
558
Points
113
Location
Queensland
Your Mac's Specs
Mini (2014, 2018, 2020), MBA (2020), iPad Pro (2018), iPhone 13 Pro Max, Watch (S6)
But "Find My Mac" is not a data mining tool. If someone used it to figure out where I live, it would take some intervention and network penetration to get that data. On the other hand, pretty much everything Google makes is designed to report back to the mothership on how, where and when it's being used. And for that I do blame Google, they designed it that way.
I don't, for a second, suggest that I'm naive to Google's data collection. I am very well aware that the business model the company is built on is premised on user data collection. However, I think it is unfair to assume that everything that they do involves collecting personal data especially, as per the example of Chrome, there is little evidence to suggest that's the case.

I think it's also a little troublesome to assume that Apple should be free from critique. They can say what they like but they amass a tremendous amount of data from their users. Apple collects data from your devices constantly and however much it might be anonymized, they still reap the benefits of having information on me. For example, I quote the following two statements from Apple's privacy policy:
We also use personal information to help us create, develop, operate, deliver, and improve our products, services, content and advertising, and for loss prevention and anti-fraud purposes [...] We may also use personal information for internal purposes such as auditing, data analysis, and research to improve Apple’s products, services, and customer communications.
Or, more jarring:
Apple shares personal information with companies who provide services such as information processing, extending credit, fulfilling customer orders, delivering products to you, managing and enhancing customer data, providing customer service, assessing your interest in our products and services, and conducting customer research or satisfaction surveys.
Without question, Apple admits to using data about myself for their own business gains. Sure, this is different than Google which might be more likely to disseminate my information but the end consequence is the same - a business is using information about my uses of their products (also of note - Apple uses data about me for advertising purposes).

I'm not out to defend Google or blame Apple - I like both and have issue with data collection on the part of each respective company. As such, I think it's dangerous to place blame entirely in one camp while allowing the other to escape necessary critique. Then again, I'm a naturally critical person and have issue with my data being used for the purposes of gains elsewhere.
 
Joined
Oct 16, 2010
Messages
15,144
Reaction score
599
Points
113
Location
Brentwood Bay, BC, Canada
With the mention of Ghostery here and elsewhere, I tried using it as suggested for a while, it seemed to be impressive and then I began to wonder. I have had it disabled for some time now.

From various articles, it seems that it may not be quite as helpful nor ethical as this and others seem to suggest:
A Popular Ad Blocker Also Helps the Ad Industry | MIT Technology Review
 
M

MacInWin

Guest
It IS helpful, and just don't agree to data sharing. It blocks a ton of crap at almost every site.
 

Shop Amazon


Shop for your Apple, Mac, iPhone and other computer products on Amazon.
We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon and affiliated sites.
Top