how to disable passwords for actions by administrator

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I have searched all over this site, and all over the internet to no avail. Every search result came back with instructions on how to recover a forgotten password. But I will continue to search, so i apologize if this is a repost.

I just bought a brand new Mac Mini (the 599 one) and set it up last night. Naturally, i started customizing right away. (I'm a stubborn graphic designer who likes to have things exactly where i want them, etc.) I began installing productivity apps, google chrome, etc. Every time i install something, or make a change, it requests an administrator password.. Even though i'm logged in on the administrator account.

My question is, how do i disable this? I live with people i trust and i'm NOT concerned about unauthorized access to my computer. I have nothing to hide and i don't want to have to enter an admin password for every app/software install.

please help!
 

vansmith

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You shouldn't have to enter a password if you install files to /Applications. You also have full write privileges to your home directory and a few other directories such as /tmp. Other directories require passwords for a reason - this is how Unix works.

You could change this by making the entire filesystem r/w for everyone but seeing as how that is extraordinarily unsecure, I don't feel comfortable telling you how to do it.
 
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i accept all responsibility for changes that i make. This computer is ONLY for designing etc. none of my personal info will be stored on the computer.. i wont use it for banking etc.

Also, the Macs i use at school don't require passwords for everything (some things yes, but not everything, as is the case on my computer). So there must be a way to change permissions on a lower level than simply changing the entire filesystem right?
 
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If it is a drag & drop installation you can drag it to the Applications folder within your user folder, or anywhere within your user folder for that matter. If it uses Apple's Installer you will need an admin name & password. You may or may not be able to get around that by right clicking on the installer package, select "Show Package Contents" and drag & drop the app from there.
 
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I suppose i'm just curious/frustrated as to why Apple thought it was neccessary to require a password for all of this stuff.. I understand accessing information, or on a subordinate account on the computer.. but if you're logged in as an administrator, it shouldn't need constant passwords..

Oh well, i suppose it won't be too big of an issue once i have everything set up the way I want.

Thanks. = )
 
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i accept all responsibility for changes that i make. This computer is ONLY for designing etc. none of my personal info will be stored on the computer.. i wont use it for banking etc.

Also, the Macs i use at school don't require passwords for everything (some things yes, but not everything, as is the case on my computer). So there must be a way to change permissions on a lower level than simply changing the entire filesystem right?

There is read up on how to change ownership in Unix
 

vansmith

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I suppose i'm just curious/frustrated as to why Apple thought it was neccessary to require a password for all of this stuff.. I understand accessing information, or on a subordinate account on the computer.. but if you're logged in as an administrator, it shouldn't need constant passwords..

Oh well, i suppose it won't be too big of an issue once i have everything set up the way I want.

Thanks. = )
It's not Apple's fault entirely but more how Unix is designed (OS X is a Unix operating system). While it might be frustrating, you should have full write privileges to just about everything you need.

The fact that you have to enter your password to write to other areas of the filesystem is a good thing (despite being frustrating). Perhaps my question is how often are you asked to enter your password? You shouldn't have to do so very often assuming you stick to the directories that were setup to be written to.
 

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