Did Windows copy Mac in using the term 'Apps'?

Joined
Dec 1, 2013
Messages
437
Reaction score
3
Points
18
I was a Window user from 95 to Windows 7. From memory, Windows used to call 'Apps' as 'Software' or 'Programs'. Recently, the start button says 'Apps' for example. Now I hear software and programs less often ever since they came out with Windows 8. Can someone care to explain?
 

pigoo3

Well-known member
Staff member
Admin
Joined
May 20, 2008
Messages
44,223
Reaction score
1,432
Points
113
Location
U.S.
Your Mac's Specs
2017 15" MBP, 16gig ram, 1TB SSD, OS 10.15
I can anecdotally answer that question. Many times Apple sets the trend (whether it be computer design, software design, user interface design (UI), or terminology).

In other words…Apple takes the risk trying new things. Sometimes they work…and sometimes not. Meanwhile companies like Microsoft sit back and wait to see if what Apple does is successful/popular/trendy. If it is…then Microsoft (or other companies) copy it.

In this case with the term "app"…Apple was clearly using this term before Microsoft.:) So Microsoft copied/went with the trend!;)

- Nick
 
C

chas_m

Guest
ISTR that Steve Jobs either coined or was the first I ever heard use the term "Apps" in specific reference to distinguishing mobile programs from desktop programs. We now use the term apps to refer to all kinds of software without regard to platform, but originally it was meant to imply a mobile version of a desktop program or an original developed-for-mobile application.
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2007
Messages
3,494
Reaction score
204
Points
63
Location
Going Galt...
Your Mac's Specs
MacBookAir5,2:10.13.6-iMac18,3:10.13.6-iPhone9,3:11.4.1
We've been using the term "app" as shorthand to refer to applications in business IT since last century.
"What print app are we using for Zebra label output?"
"Have the app programmer look over the ABAP code."
"How many ERP app servers does the warehouse need for delivery tickets?"
"Make sure the Websphere app server has the correct HTLM plugin."
"How many apps are you running per WPAR on your P8 hardware?"
All things I've been asked or ask on a daily basis for a decade or more. None of it has anything to do with mobile applications. More people may be using the term "app" now, but it is very freaking far from new or innovative.
 
Joined
Feb 10, 2015
Messages
6
Reaction score
1
Points
3
Location
Central Indiana, USA
Your Mac's Specs
Macbook Pro 15" with Retina Display (2014), i7 2.5GHz, 16GB RAM, 512GB PCIe SSD, nVidia GT 750M
We've been using the term "app" as shorthand to refer to applications in business IT since last century.
"What print app are we using for Zebra label output?"
"Have the app programmer look over the ABAP code."
"How many ERP app servers does the warehouse need for delivery tickets?"
"Make sure the Websphere app server has the correct HTLM plugin."
"How many apps are you running per WPAR on your P8 hardware?"
All things I've been asked or ask on a daily basis for a decade or more. None of it has anything to do with mobile applications. More people may be using the term "app" now, but it is very freaking far from new or innovative.

Pretty much this. Apple simply made the term familiar to the masses.
 

vansmith

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2008
Messages
19,946
Reaction score
581
Points
113
Location
Queensland
Your Mac's Specs
Too many devices to list
The term app is just shorthand for application and has been in used since well before Apple used the term for mobile devices. Companies were shipping PDAs and other mobile devices with apps long before Apple was and companies were building desktop machines with apps long before Apple did.

In short: apps is not an Apple specific thing but this does speak to the power of Apple's marketing team to convince people that it did coin the term or that they were the first to use it in a particular context.
 
Joined
Sep 30, 2007
Messages
9,962
Reaction score
1,236
Points
113
Location
The Republic of Neptune
Your Mac's Specs
2019 iMac 27"; 2020 M1 MacBook Air; macOS up-to-date... always.
In short: apps is not an Apple specific thing but this does speak to the power of Apple's marketing team to convince people that it did coin the term or that they were the first to use it in a particular context.

I don't recall ever seeing any marketing on Apple's behalf that tried to claim any of that.
 

vansmith

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2008
Messages
19,946
Reaction score
581
Points
113
Location
Queensland
Your Mac's Specs
Too many devices to list
Perhaps I should change that to "legal team" then, a group that has sued other companies for use of the term "app store" despite the execs using the term generically (source). During that suit, Apple had the audacity to claim that it could trademark the term "App Store" in part because it was changing the meaning of the word and thus, had the right to trademark it when used in particular ways (source).
 
Joined
Feb 10, 2015
Messages
6
Reaction score
1
Points
3
Location
Central Indiana, USA
Your Mac's Specs
Macbook Pro 15" with Retina Display (2014), i7 2.5GHz, 16GB RAM, 512GB PCIe SSD, nVidia GT 750M
Perhaps I should change that to "legal team" then, a group that has sued other companies for use of the term "app store" despite the execs using the term generically (source). During that suit, Apple had the audacity to claim that it could trademark the term "App Store" in part because it was changing the meaning of the word and thus, had the right to trademark it when used in particular ways (source).

Now that you mention that, I do remember it being in the news. It's kind of akin to Village Pantry trying trademark the term "convenience store" or Best Buy or Sears Hardware (or Apple, for that matter) trying to trademark "toy store" - because...you know...that's how many of us view them, anyway.
 

Shop Amazon


Shop for your Apple, Mac, iPhone and other computer products on Amazon.
We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon and affiliated sites.
Top