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cleaning iPhone screen

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I've been using rubbing alcohol to clean my iPhone XR screen, and actually the entire phone. Now I'm reading that rubbing alcohol may damage the glass screen. Some sites say to "use a damp, soft cloth". But water on a soft cloth is not going to remove any germs or virus.

So what is the truth about rubbing alcohol being damaging, and what is the best to disinfect an iPhone?

I saw some UV boxes but they are $80.
 

chscag

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Using alcohol to clean the screen on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac can damage the anti-reflective coating. It's definitely a no no.

I realize that lots of folks are a bit paranoid about germs or viruses now that we are in the middle of a world-wide pandemic, but I'm sure that there are other ways to keep devices clean.

As an aside, I use lens cleaner on a soft cloth to clean the screens in my devices.
 
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If you look at Clorox Disinfectant Wipes, it's just soap in a moist cloth. No bleach, no alcohol, just moist, soapy cloths. You can do the same with a dish cloth, damp and with some soap of any kind. Then rinse the cloth with fresh water, wring it out to make it back to just moist and wipe off the soap. Done.
 
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If you look at Clorox Disinfectant Wipes, it's just soap in a moist cloth. No bleach, no alcohol, just moist, soapy cloths. You can do the same with a dish cloth, damp and with some soap of any kind. Then rinse the cloth with fresh water, wring it out to make it back to just moist and wipe off the soap. Done.
Soap is not only very effective against coronavirus, but arguably more effective than alcohol alone, at least when it comes to hand sanitizers. It's certainly going to be fine on a hard surface.
Coronavirus expert explains why soap is better than hand sanitizer – BGR
The science of soap – here’s how it kills the coronavirus | Pall Thordarson | Opinion | The Guardian
Why soap is preferable to bleach in the fight against coronavirus

"Soap works so effectively because its chemistry pries open the coronavirus’s exterior envelope and cause it to degrade. These soap molecules then trap tiny fragments of the virus, which are washed away in water."
 

IWT


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Totally agree with LIAB re soap. Tons of evidence that it is much more effective than alcohol on its own.

Soap is cheap, comes with no or nice smells according to preference, is easy to apply and is "kind" to hands as well as phones.

Ian
 
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Who else is using your phone that you're worrying about viruses etc? I use a 350° cover and a tempered glass screen which I rub on my sleeve it it gets grubby...
 
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Who else is using your phone that you're worrying about viruses etc? I use a 350° cover and a tempered glass screen which I rub on my sleeve it it gets grubby...
It can get contaminated just like any other surface. Same for anything else you handle with your hands: car keys; wallet; cash; door knobs; the chair you are sitting in; the list goes on. Phones may get more attention in part due to how much they are handled, but also due to how much time they spend in front of our faces, so their exposure is higher to where the viruses are expelled (out of our mouths/noses).

I personally don't over worry about "my" gear. If it's contaminated, it's because *I* contaminated it, in which case it's already too late for me. Just don't ever handle your phone (or anything else that's yours) until you know your hands are clean.
 
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LIAB, the effectiveness of soap is why I said what I did. No need for Clorox wipes (v. expensive) as opposed to a damp soapy cloth (v. cheap). Some folks think Clorox means bleach.
 
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LIAB, the effectiveness of soap is why I said what I did. No need for Clorox wipes (v. expensive) as opposed to a damp soapy cloth (v. cheap). Some folks think Clorox means bleach.
I know, I was just backing you up on that with some articles explaining the science. :)

I actually didn't know the Clorox wipes didn't contain bleach until you mentioned it before.
 

chscag

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The original question asked by member Barrygou was about using rubbing alcohol to clean the screen of his iPhone. And I will reiterate... do not use any alcohol based product to clean the screen of your iPhone, iPad, or your Mac. Alcohol use has been known to remove the anti-reflective coating that's on the screen of an iPhone, iPad, and Mac.

I personally don't over worry about "my" gear. If it's contaminated, it's because *I* contaminated it, in which case it's already too late for me. Just don't ever handle your phone (or anything else that's yours) until you know your hands are clean.
+1 for that statement.
 
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+1 for all of that, chscag!
 
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LIAB, the effectiveness of soap is why I said what I did. No need for Clorox wipes (v. expensive) as opposed to a damp soapy cloth (v. cheap). Some folks think Clorox means bleach.

I know, I was just backing you up on that with some articles explaining the science. :)

I actually didn't know the Clorox wipes didn't contain bleach until you mentioned it before.
BTW, true story here. I occasionally harp on my wife about "soap and water", but she is a consumer to the core and just buys into whatever they are selling. Those wipes are especially a sore point with me. One day I was finishing up some dishes and cleaned up the sink and counter. I wiped it all down with dish soap and sponge (the sponge thing is another one that aggravates me... she just won't use a washcloth). She comes right behind me, opens up the wipes, and wipes it all down again. Arrrrghh!

Anyway, her thinking is finally changing. We had to hand wash the dishes for over a month when our dishwasher needed replacement and installs were on hold so I pushed washcloth usage over sponges forward. Today, I shared those same "soap and water" articles on Facebook for family and friends, and what I've been telling her finally set in, or so she came and said as much. Sometimes it's just not enough to tell people that such and such is true. Knowing the science behind it really helps with acceptance.
 
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