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Catalina and my Accounting Software--Please explain

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I hate to seem ignorant but I guess I am. I've used a wonderful accounting software called Account Edge for 24 years. It was called MYOB (mind your own business) and then morphed into Account Edge. For months now they have sent out notices not to upgrade to Catalina because Account Edge was not compatible, and they would let us know as soon as it was ready.

So today they send out a notice that it will never happen. And then proceed to use all this language I do not understand about a hosted subscription service. Why can't they fix their codebase? Someone commented on their FB page it is " because they ultimately decided it was not worth the investment. Clearly, a subscription/cloud-based model is where they want to drive their users, and this 64-bit port provides the rationalization for driving AE users toward that more profitable (to them) model. Know that there is nothing prohibiting a 64-bit port..."

So now I'm wondering instead of actually involving a team of developers and analysts to make A/Edge compatible with Catalina, they were busy getting their $40 a month subscription service going instead.

From notice:
"We are disappointed to share that we will not be able to offer a Catalina-compliant version of AccountEdge - now or in the future. In the end, AccountEdge’s 30-year-old codebase proved too outdated to establish compatibility with Apple’s newest operating system. In spite of a multi-year project that involved a team of developers and analysts, it’s a project we will not be able to complete.

We recognize the inconvenience this presents to many loyal, long-time AccountEdge Mac users and for that we are truly sorry. Until very recently it has been our earnest intention to deliver you something compliant, new and awesome.

We’ve outlined your options, whether you choose to continue using AccountEdge (including on macOS Catalina) or to evaluate our best-in-class cloud solutions where we can, of course, help to convert your AccountEdge data.

AccountEdge Options
DON'T UPGRADE TO CATALINA


We will continue to update AccountEdge for those that continue to use AccountEdge on your Mac. We’ll deliver payroll tax updates and upgrades for years to come and we will be proactive in communicating our plans. In fact, AccountEdge 2020 is now available.

ACCOUNTEDGE HOSTED (NEW)

We recently launched a hosted, subscription service that allows you to access your AccountEdge company file from any Mac or Windows environment, including Catalina."

(end quote). And then they go on to say "We will continue to develop, support and enhance AccountEdge for Windows, which is not impacted by macOS compatibility issues. Should it be convenient for you to use AccountEdge in a Windows environment, we will convert your Mac licenses (at no charge) to Windows."

I understand what a subscription based software program is but that isn't what I really want. But I just don't really understand why they just gave up.
 

chscag

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Hi Nancy:

Sorry to hear about your dilemma with regards to AccountEdge. Apparently, the company decided that it was too expensive and time consuming to develop a 64 bit version of the software for macOS and instead decided to go with a cloud based version via subscription. In my opinion, this developer has fallen behind the times and has become complacent with their customers.

If you're set on using AccountEdge you have some choices to make:

1. Stick with Mojave and do not upgrade to Catalina.

2. Run the Windows version of AccountEdge in a macOS virtual machine: Parallels, VMWare, or VirtualBox (free). Windows 10 can be downloaded and run for free.

3. Go with the cloud version and pay the monthly fee.

4. Switch to another accounting software. (probably not practical).
 
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Thank you so much for your reply. I probably will switch to another software. One of my problems has always been keeping up with progress. I finally have up to date computers and phones and even have Apple Music now! So I hate to get in my old rut of sticking with Mojave like I stuck with Snow Leopard for all those years. I still have an old MacBook running Snow Leopard (do not use it however). I guess in the end it isn't that big of a deal. But it was great software for sure and so very easy to use.
 
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What I use are 2 ssd drives that i swap when i need Snow Leopard to import scans with the canonscan 30 and print with a HP 932 Jet.
these machines are superior and sync well with my eco-system.
this might seem like a pain in the butt but worth keeping these treasured very reliable items working.
the other ssd is running high sierra for faster internet and security from stoping bad links and sites.

Your older MacBook should be an asset and used to run older software and runs files. that can also connect to the main computer using a network or airdrop (in some cases). you might be surprised how well the performance on an older machine can be.

The toughest aspect with  is sacrificing using software that we are very used to and fulfill our productive computing task just to keep updated with that year's trend. iI never understood why my MacBook air cannot run Mojave when the processor, sd card and other components in the laptop can.
i just need to accept this dilemma  will always implore.

i don't know this is helpful, but we all have suffered some kind of loss while upgrading these past years.
 
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Nancy, your post was thoughtful and not emotional, which is a breath of fresh air. Thanks for that.

Charlie gave your options, which are limited. But he didn't try to answer the final question you asked, which was:
I understand what a subscription based software program is but that isn't what I really want. But I just don't really understand why they just gave up.
I suspect what drove them to the decision was that the effort required to make all the changes needed to upgrade to 64 bit just wasn't economically smart for them. When software is developed, the code is developed in an environment where some features/functions are pre-built, or purchased from some other developer who did the work at the base level to create some functions. If these third party developers don't continue to upgrade their individual components, the company has two options; one is develop the function from scratch themselves, the other is to see if anybody else has a similar product. Neither option is cheap. When software is mature, like Account Edge, some components may go back a long way (in terms of computer age) and may well be impossible to repair/replace/redevelop. So Account Edge gets backed into a corner where it just doesn't make economic sense to keep trying.

It's a bit like owning an old car. At some point the parts needed to repair it get harder and harder to find and the owner has to make a fundamental decision on whether or not it's worth it to invest in the cost of maintenance. Unlike old cars, however, software doesn't have a point where it gains value as an "antique" that reverses the trend.

What Account Edge is doing is running the software on a server with an older version of macOS, or even a Windows server, and letting Mac users access it through a browser. They are charging a monthly subscription, which a lot of vendors are adopting, for the service. I guess their calculation is that most business users will be so invested in AE that they will just move over (or buy a Windows box to run it on), but for individual users like you, the options are all difficult.

I don't think they said one thing (we are fixing the software) and did something else (develop subscription service). I think they did give it a go at fixing it, realized it was hopeless and then decided the way to support Mac users who did upgrade (and will eventually upgrade) by offering the functions online, but charge a subscription. Personally I think $40/month is a bit high, but I have no idea what the cost model for them says.
 
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...I probably will switch to another software. ... But it was great software for sure and so very easy to use.
Well first, let me mention that I just updated my Macintosh Accounting Software Web site *last night*! So you might find it helpful in choosing alternate accounting software.

Macintosh Accounting Software

Second, ironically, I used to talk up AccountEdge all the time because they were so devoted to the Macintosh, but most users found it hard to understand and ultimately hated it. There are other accounting programs that are better known for ease of use, you might want to especially have a look at one of these:

Accounted ($80)
Accounted << Oranged Software

Bean Counter ($60)
Tidal Pool Software

TinyBooks ($79)
TinyBooks Pro: Ultra-Simple Macintosh Accounting and Bookkeeping Software for Small Business
 
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Your explanation was very informative and much appreciated. I absolutely understand now why the idea was abandoned and do not believe the decision was an easy one after reading the possibilities you outlined. Thank you so much.

Nancy, your post was thoughtful and not emotional, which is a breath of fresh air. Thanks for that.

Charlie gave your options, which are limited. But he didn't try to answer the final question you asked, which was: I suspect what drove them to the decision was that the effort required to make all the changes needed to upgrade to 64 bit just wasn't economically smart for them. When software is developed, the code is developed in an environment where some features/functions are pre-built, or purchased from some other developer who did the work at the base level to create some functions. If these third party developers don't continue to upgrade their individual components, the company has two options; one is develop the function from scratch themselves, the other is to see if anybody else has a similar product. Neither option is cheap. When software is mature, like Account Edge, some components may go back a long way (in terms of computer age) and may well be impossible to repair/replace/redevelop. So Account Edge gets backed into a corner where it just doesn't make economic sense to keep trying.

It's a bit like owning an old car. At some point the parts needed to repair it get harder and harder to find and the owner has to make a fundamental decision on whether or not it's worth it to invest in the cost of maintenance. Unlike old cars, however, software doesn't have a point where it gains value as an "antique" that reverses the trend.

What Account Edge is doing is running the software on a server with an older version of macOS, or even a Windows server, and letting Mac users access it through a browser. They are charging a monthly subscription, which a lot of vendors are adopting, for the service. I guess their calculation is that most business users will be so invested in AE that they will just move over (or buy a Windows box to run it on), but for individual users like you, the options are all difficult.

I don't think they said one thing (we are fixing the software) and did something else (develop subscription service). I think they did give it a go at fixing it, realized it was hopeless and then decided the way to support Mac users who did upgrade (and will eventually upgrade) by offering the functions online, but charge a subscription. Personally I think $40/month is a bit high, but I have no idea what the cost model for them says.
 
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I'll check it out tomorrow! Using AE for 24 years will make change difficult but that's life.


Well first, let me mention that I just updated my Macintosh Accounting Software Web site *last night*! So you might find it helpful in choosing alternate accounting software.

Macintosh Accounting Software

Second, ironically, I used to talk up AccountEdge all the time because they were so devoted to the Macintosh, but most users found it hard to understand and ultimately hated it. There are other accounting programs that are better known for ease of use, you might want to especially have a look at one of theses

Accounted ($80)
Accounted << Oranged Software

Bean Counter ($60)
Tidal Pool Software

TinyBooks ($79)
TinyBooks Pro: Ultra-Simple Macintosh Accounting and Bookkeeping Software for Small Business
 
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I'm thinking of trying out Moneyworks. There is still a desktop version. I don't need anything as robust as AE anymore. I don't have inventory to manage or payroll. It will be easier to start now with something new since it is still January.

I did use iBank for a year or so in 2008 for my personal use and just found it not a match for me. I don't need all those color wheels and graphs. Just reports like AE has.

My other choice is to go back and use my old iMac which is Snow Leopard and no longer connected to the internet. Update--I just turned it on and cannot access my AE data since they fixed it so I could transfer it to my new iMac. Frankly I'm not sure AE Pro will run on Snow Leopard since they told me the MYOB/AE would not run on my iMac. Forgot to say my old iMac is version 7.1 running 12.01 MYOB/AE.

Thoughts? I think it may be easier to just change now.


Well first, let me mention that I just updated my Macintosh Accounting Software Web site *last night*! So you might find it helpful in choosing alternate accounting software.

Macintosh Accounting Software

Second, ironically, I used to talk up AccountEdge all the time because they were so devoted to the Macintosh, but most users found it hard to understand and ultimately hated it. There are other accounting programs that are better known for ease of use, you might want to especially have a look at one of these:

Accounted ($80)
Accounted << Oranged Software

Bean Counter ($60)
Tidal Pool Software

TinyBooks ($79)
TinyBooks Pro: Ultra-Simple Macintosh Accounting and Bookkeeping Software for Small Business
 
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