Borrowing an Install disk

T

thorsonb

Guest
My Macbook OSX 10.5 disc's are scratched :(

Since Mac install CD's don't have serial keys, I was wondering if its safe to borrow the disc's from my friend (who also has a Macbook)

And install all the stuff over from his disc's?


Or does each Mac OSX disc have an unique ID and when I go online it will tell me I have a pirated copy of Mac OS X? the disc? ( I dont want both of us to get piracy warning's on our Mac's and then get locked :( what would suck )
 

pigoo3

Well-known member
Staff member
Admin
Joined
May 20, 2008
Messages
44,223
Reaction score
1,432
Points
113
Location
U.S.
Your Mac's Specs
2017 15" MBP, 16gig ram, 1TB SSD, OS 10.15
Since Mac install CD's don't have serial keys, I was wondering if its safe to borrow the disc's from my friend (who also has a Macbook)

And install all the stuff over from his disc's?[/B]

The question isn't about safety...it's about doing the right thing! It's against Apple's EULA (End User License Agreement) to install OS X on more than 1 computer/disc.

You need to purchase your own install disc...to replace your scratched disk.

- Nick
 

bobtomay

,
Retired Staff
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
26,561
Reaction score
677
Points
113
Location
Texas, where else?
Your Mac's Specs
15" MBP '06 2.33 C2D 4GB 10.7; 13" MBA '14 1.8 i7 8GB 10.11; 21" iMac '13 2.9 i5 8GB 10.11; 6S
Or call Apple for a replacement set of discs. We've had members report anything from free to $20 the last few months.
 
OP
T

thorsonb

Guest
Gonna Buy OSX 10.6

The question isn't about safety...it's about doing the right thing! It's against Apple's EULA (End User License Agreement) to install OS X on more than 1 computer/disc.

You need to purchase your own install disc...to replace your scratched disk.

- Nick

Ah its best i do buy it anyways!, My Disc came with all the extra stuff like Garage band n stuff, his doesn't have it.

Might as well just buy OSX 10.6 Snow Leopard...New should be better :p

To the Mac store I go!!!! :D
 
OP
T

thorsonb

Guest
Or call Apple for a replacement set of discs. We've had members report anything from free to $20 the last few months.


Well In the Netherlands, I cant seem to find a replacement disc at a reasonable price!
 

pigoo3

Well-known member
Staff member
Admin
Joined
May 20, 2008
Messages
44,223
Reaction score
1,432
Points
113
Location
U.S.
Your Mac's Specs
2017 15" MBP, 16gig ram, 1TB SSD, OS 10.15
Might as well just buy OSX 10.6 Snow Leopard...New should be better :p

To the Mac store I go!!!! :D

Yes...10.6 in the Netherlands is just € 29,00...can't beat that price!

- Nick
 

cwa107


Retired Staff
Joined
Dec 20, 2006
Messages
27,042
Reaction score
812
Points
113
Location
Lake Mary, Florida
Your Mac's Specs
14" MacBook Pro M1 Pro, 16GB RAM, 1TB SSD
You'll need to call Apple and inquire about spare parts. That's the best place to look to get the exact replacements. Even if you purchase Snow Leopard, you will not get the iLife suite.

If you decide not to, you might be better off picking up the "Mac Boxed Set", which includes iLife '09 and iWork '09 as well.
 
Joined
Jan 14, 2010
Messages
65
Reaction score
3
Points
8
Your Mac's Specs
13" MacBook (late-2008)
OSX EULA:
A. Single Use License. Subject to the terms and conditions of this License, unless you have purchased a Family Pack or Upgrade license for the Apple Software, you are granted a limited non-exclusive license to install, use and run one (1) copy of the Apple Software on a single Apple-branded computer at a time.

-------------

It doesn't say you have to use the install disc that came with your computer to install OSX. You are licensed to use OSX, the install media is irrelevant.
 
Joined
Jan 14, 2010
Messages
65
Reaction score
3
Points
8
Your Mac's Specs
13" MacBook (late-2008)
sorry for the double post:

hugtheslug said:
When I was scratching around for Panther I phoned Software Support at Apple UK in the hopes that they might still have a copy in stock somewhere, and although they couldn't locate a copy I was advised to borrow discs from anyone I could to use.
I got them to repeat it then I said, surely that's against your own EULA but the assistant said no, because the discs are tied to the hardware, so as long as I was installing to an Apple machine it would be OK.
That surprised me coming from Apple themselves so maybe I should phone again and see if I can get the same opinion.

Cheers

Hugh

Thus, it is NOT illegal to borrow an install disc from a friend IF you have already purchased the software. PERIOD. Stop deleting my posts and don't try to argue this one.
 

cwa107


Retired Staff
Joined
Dec 20, 2006
Messages
27,042
Reaction score
812
Points
113
Location
Lake Mary, Florida
Your Mac's Specs
14" MacBook Pro M1 Pro, 16GB RAM, 1TB SSD
OSX EULA:
A. Single Use License. Subject to the terms and conditions of this License, unless you have purchased a Family Pack or Upgrade license for the Apple Software, you are granted a limited non-exclusive license to install, use and run one (1) copy of the Apple Software on a single Apple-branded computer at a time.

-------------

It doesn't say you have to use the install disc that came with your computer to install OSX. You are licensed to use OSX, the install media is irrelevant.

You are correct. It is not illegal to borrow someone else's disc if you have a license to use the same version.

The problem is that the gray system discs are usually model specific and are not usually interchangeable. Even if you have a disc from a MacBook, if that MacBook model varies significantly from your own in terms of hardware, those discs might not work.

I think the reason you're seeing this kind of reaction is that so many people think it's OK to use someone else's discs to do an upgrade to OS X. Or maybe they're oblivious to the differing versions or differing iterations of the models that the discs accompany.

This is why I recommend ordering a set of replacement discs from Apple spare parts. You're then assured that you're getting the original, appropriate discs for your model.
 

pigoo3

Well-known member
Staff member
Admin
Joined
May 20, 2008
Messages
44,223
Reaction score
1,432
Points
113
Location
U.S.
Your Mac's Specs
2017 15" MBP, 16gig ram, 1TB SSD, OS 10.15
You are correct. It is not illegal to borrow someone else's disc if you have a license to use the same version.

This seems sort of new to me...is there a link we can see that explains this?

I just want to know what the "real deal" is.:)

Thanks,

- Nick
 

cwa107


Retired Staff
Joined
Dec 20, 2006
Messages
27,042
Reaction score
812
Points
113
Location
Lake Mary, Florida
Your Mac's Specs
14" MacBook Pro M1 Pro, 16GB RAM, 1TB SSD
This seems sort of new to me...is there a link we can see that explains this?

I just want to know what the "real deal" is.:)

Thanks,

- Nick

It's common sense. This is why it's referred to as a "license", because it grants you specific rights and privileges. When you "buy" software, you're not buying the physical medium that it comes on, you're buying a license to use it. In this case, when you bought your Mac, part of that purchase was a right to use the version of OS X that you purchased it with.

It's irrelevant what disc you used to install it, as long as it's the same version, it doesn't matter in the eyes of the law. Quite honestly, the software that was installed on your hard disk most likely came from a disk image, rather than the discs that accompanied it.

The only time it's different is when there is product activation tied to that product and a particular product ID is associated with that specific disc. In those cases, the water gets very muddy.
 
Joined
Jul 30, 2009
Messages
7,305
Reaction score
308
Points
83
Location
Wisconsin
Your Mac's Specs
Mac Mini (Late 2014) 2.6GHz Intel Core i5 Memory: 8GB 1600MHz DDR3
OSX EULA:
A. Single Use License. Subject to the terms and conditions of this License, unless you have purchased a Family Pack or Upgrade license for the Apple Software, you are granted a limited non-exclusive license to install, use and run one (1) copy of the Apple Software on a single Apple-branded computer at a time.

If that's a direct quote, it gives credence to the contention I saw yesterday that one can buy a single OSX retail disc, and install it on several computers, as long as only one of those is in use. ...that is, no simultaneous use on two or more at a time.

So, if you upgrade a Leopard desktop to SL, you could then use the same single-license disc to upgrade a Tiger MacBook to go on the road with. Is that right?
 

pigoo3

Well-known member
Staff member
Admin
Joined
May 20, 2008
Messages
44,223
Reaction score
1,432
Points
113
Location
U.S.
Your Mac's Specs
2017 15" MBP, 16gig ram, 1TB SSD, OS 10.15
It's common sense. This is why it's referred to as a "license", because it grants you specific rights and privileges. When you "buy" software, you're not buying the physical medium that it comes on, you're buying a license to use it.

Sorry man...it doesn't seem like common sense to me. Letting someone "borrow" a Macintosh OS install disk (this threads subject)...because their disk got damaged...in my computing experience just doesn't "feel" right.

Borrowing or lending of Macintosh OS install disks invariably leads to unauthorized OS installs. Someone reading this thread is undoubtedly going to get confused about what the meaning of "borrow" means...and may end up borrowing/lending their OS install disc to someone who is NOT a licensed owner of the particular Macintosh OS version in question.

Like I said...to me...any "borrowing" of Macintosh OS install disks just doesn't "feel" right. Maybe it truly is ok for one licensed owner to "borrow or lend" their OS install disk to another licensed owner of the same OS install.

I would just prefer to see/read what Apples position is on this...to make me "feel" correct about doing it.

Thanks,

- Nick
 

cwa107


Retired Staff
Joined
Dec 20, 2006
Messages
27,042
Reaction score
812
Points
113
Location
Lake Mary, Florida
Your Mac's Specs
14" MacBook Pro M1 Pro, 16GB RAM, 1TB SSD
Sorry man...it doesn't seem like common sense to me. Letting someone "borrow" a Macintosh OS install disk (this threads subject)...because their disk got damaged...in my computing experience just doesn't "feel" right.

Borrowing or lending of Macintosh OS install disks invariably leads to unauthorized OS installs. Someone reading this thread is undoubtedly going to get confused about what the meaning of "borrow" means...and may end up borrowing/lending their OS install disc to someone who is NOT a licensed owner of the particular Macintosh OS version in question.

Like I said...to me...any "borrowing" of Macintosh OS install disks just doesn't "feel" right. Maybe it truly is ok for one licensed owner to "borrow or lend" their OS install disk to another licensed owner of the same OS install.

I would just prefer to see/read what Apples position is on this...to make me "feel" correct about doing it.

Thanks,

- Nick

Somehow I doubt Apple has a specific mention in writing of borrowing another install disk in the event the originals are scratched. What I am referring to is essentially licensing 101, as I have worked in software licensing in my professional life for some time.

As I said, if this were not true - if you were compelled to use the specific discs that came with your system to maintain your license - Apple and just about every other vendor that sells computers bundled with an OS would be in violation. At the factory, the hard disks are generally imaged with a system image that is applied to every machine in that production cycle, not the discs that happened to be packaged for restore purposes.

The word "borrow" may muddy the waters for you, but it's pretty clear cut to me. You have a license to run 10.6, for example. It doesn't matter how you install 10.6 onto your system, provided that you are a valid licensee. It's that simple.
 

pigoo3

Well-known member
Staff member
Admin
Joined
May 20, 2008
Messages
44,223
Reaction score
1,432
Points
113
Location
U.S.
Your Mac's Specs
2017 15" MBP, 16gig ram, 1TB SSD, OS 10.15
Somehow I doubt Apple has a specific mention in writing of borrowing another install disk in the event the originals are scratched. What I am referring to is essentially licensing 101, as I have worked in software licensing in my professional life for some time.

As I said, if this were not true - if you were compelled to use the specific discs that came with your system to maintain your license - Apple and just about every other vendor that sells computers bundled with an OS would be in violation. At the factory, the hard disks are generally imaged with a system image that is applied to every machine in that production cycle, not the discs that happened to be packaged for restore purposes.

The word "borrow" may muddy the waters for you, but it's pretty clear cut to me. You have a license to run 10.6, for example. It doesn't matter how you install 10.6 onto your system, provided that you are a valid licensee. It's that simple.

Obviously your experience in licensing is much much greater than mine!:) All I'm saying is the "legal borrowing" (as opposed to illegal borrowing) of an OS install disk just doesn't feel right. I'm focusing on the principle that:

- one disc = one license = installed on only one computer at the same time

If an install disc is "borrowed" to another licensed user...then technically this one black retail OS 10.5 install disc...is now installed on two computers at the same time...and to me this is where the licensing issue violation begins.

It's sort of like a Macintosh Family Pack OS install disc...let's say OS 10.5. The owner of a Family Pack OS install disc is allowed to install the OS on 5 different Macintosh computers simultaneously. And those 5 computers are supposed to be owned & used by individuals that all reside under the same roof. Now if this Mac OS 10.5 Family Pack install disc is "borrowed or loaned" to a Macintosh owner...who owns a damaged OS 10.5 install disc...I see two violations here:

1. This Family Pack OS install disc is being used to install a copy of the Mac OS on a persons computer that does not live under the same roof as the original purchaser.

2. If the Family Pack disc is already installed on 5 computers under the same roof as the original purchaser...then "borrowing or loaning" this disc to someone else to install the OS on their computer would now be Family Pack disc simultaneous install #6...which would be a violation of the Family Pack 5 license limit.

I'm applying this same principle to a singe license OS install disc.

- 1 disc = 1 license = installed on only 1 computer at a time

Hopefully this helps clarify where I'm coming from,:)

- Nick
 
Joined
Jan 14, 2010
Messages
65
Reaction score
3
Points
8
Your Mac's Specs
13" MacBook (late-2008)
You are correct. It is not illegal to borrow someone else's disc if you have a license to use the same version.

The problem is that the gray system discs are usually model specific and are not usually interchangeable. Even if you have a disc from a MacBook, if that MacBook model varies significantly from your own in terms of hardware, those discs might not work.

I think the reason you're seeing this kind of reaction is that so many people think it's OK to use someone else's discs to do an upgrade to OS X. Or maybe they're oblivious to the differing versions or differing iterations of the models that the discs accompany.

This is why I recommend ordering a set of replacement discs from Apple spare parts. You're then assured that you're getting the original, appropriate discs for your model.

And there's nothing wrong with that logic. Thank you for providing an 'argument' rather than just deleting stuff. This way I learn things too. I didn't know the discs were as segregated as they are. It certainly makes sense to recommend a user seek replacement copies if that is the case.
 
OP
T

thorsonb

Guest
So what about if its a house mate that I live with, and were gonna be living together for a full 4 years since were in the same class in College?

I consider him/her "Family' and we live under the same roof??

And what about if the disc I am loaning/borrowing to/from a friend is the exact disc version and has the same numbers/info scribbles on it from Apple?
 
OP
T

thorsonb

Guest
OSX EULA:
A. Single Use License. Subject to the terms and conditions of this License, unless you have purchased a Family Pack or Upgrade license for the Apple Software, you are granted a limited non-exclusive license to install, use and run one (1) copy of the Apple Software on a single Apple-branded computer at a time.

-------------

It doesn't say you have to use the install disc that came with your computer to install OSX. You are licensed to use OSX, the install media is irrelevant.


Answer clearly stated right here.
 
Joined
Jul 30, 2009
Messages
7,305
Reaction score
308
Points
83
Location
Wisconsin
Your Mac's Specs
Mac Mini (Late 2014) 2.6GHz Intel Core i5 Memory: 8GB 1600MHz DDR3
If that's a direct quote, it gives credence to the contention I saw yesterday that one can buy a single OSX retail disc, and install it on several computers, as long as only one of those is in use. ...that is, no simultaneous use on two or more at a time.

So, if you upgrade a Leopard desktop to SL, you could then use the same single-license disc to upgrade a Tiger MacBook to go on the road with. Is that right?

Nobody knows?
 

Shop Amazon


Shop for your Apple, Mac, iPhone and other computer products on Amazon.
We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon and affiliated sites.
Top