• Welcome to the new Mac-Forums. See News and Community Announcements for more details.

Apple is making it more difficult to ignore update notifications

krs


Joined
Sep 16, 2008
Messages
1,741
Reaction score
42
Points
48
Location
Canada
I think Craig Federighi should have called each and every Mac user personally ;D
It's actually not funny when someone gets caught updating to Catalina, a bunch of apps that worked fine yesterday now no longer work and it's not really obvious why.

But since you mentioned "personal" notification....
I get an email from Apple about once a week trying to sell me something - Apple has contact info of anyone who ever used the Apple Store for anything, they could have sent out an email that would have covered a large portion of their installed base.

Anyway - water under the bridge.
Just an indication how the customer-centric approach Apple had is changing.
 
Joined
Oct 16, 2010
Messages
13,238
Reaction score
212
Points
63
Location
Brentwood Bay, BC, Canada
Anyway - water under the bridge.
Just an indication how the customer-centric approach Apple had is changing.

I don't know if most people even care or even give a damn, and for those who do and who vote with their wallet, I don't think Apple is too concerned that their Computer revenue is downs $0.2 billion over last year's sales. That's like pocket change for them these days.





- Patrick
======
 
Joined
Jul 6, 2008
Messages
784
Reaction score
30
Points
28
Just tried it by opening a 32-bit app on Mojave as per my last post - no pop-up, no warning.
Well of course not now, since Catalina has been out for 8 months...

I'm sure I wasn't running a special version of macOS that notified me while others had a version that didn't notify them. And it wasn't every single time you opened a 32-bit app (then people would be complaining about that...can't win!), but periodically (one of the articles said it was one-time per app, but I know for a fact I got the message more than a few times for the same apps).

Look, I'm never hesitant to criticize Apple when i think it's warranted. This is not one of those cases. They made it crystal clear about 32-bit apps. People simply don't pay attention. That's on them, not Apple.
 
Last edited:

krs


Joined
Sep 16, 2008
Messages
1,741
Reaction score
42
Points
48
Location
Canada
I thought we were done on this subject, but your comment has me a bit confused:
Well of course not now, since Catalina has been out for 8 months...
What does Catalina have to do with anything?

The warning needs to be there before people update their OS to Catalina.

Did you get the warning when moving to High Sierra or when moving to Mojave?
I'm wondering if Apple forgot to move the warning from HS to Mojave after they decided to allow 32-bit apps to still run on Mojave.

And when I read the message from Apple again, I'm now wondering if dropping support for 32-bit applications was actually somehow done in two steps. The Apple note quoted:
“This app needs to be updated by its developer to improve compatibility,” reads the warning users will see when they load a 32-bit app for the first time in macOS High Sierra 10.13.4. This is the final version of macOS that will allow 32-bit apps to be opened “without compromise.
Bolded parts are mine. but what this actually says is that 32-bit applications will still open on later macOSs, just with less compatibility and with some compromises.

Finally - the key question I would like an answer to/comment about:
Will all 32-bit applications run properly on Mojave? I always assumed "yes" but now, with the wording of the Warning by Apple, I'm beginning to wonder.
 
Joined
Jul 6, 2008
Messages
784
Reaction score
30
Points
28
What does Catalina have to do with anything?
I'm saying the horse has long left the barn. It was a warning for the upcoming operating system, which is no longer upcoming but 8 months into its lifecycle. Yes, many people haven't upgraded yet, but they were already warned that 32-it support was ending. I honestly don't remember what macOS version(s) I was on when I got the warnings, but I definitely got them periodically over a long period of time and immediately took note of what 32-bit apps I used and made plans accordingly.

Will all 32-bit applications run properly on Mojave?
The only 32-bit apps I've been using on Mojave are Inkscape, Name Manger, Sibelius 6, and QuickTime Player 7. All have been working as well as they always had before Mojave. Obviously I can't speak for other 32-bit apps. I'm on Catalina 10.15.5 on my new iMac and Mojave 10.14.6 on my 2012 iMac.
 

Rod


Joined
Jun 12, 2011
Messages
5,948
Reaction score
182
Points
63
Location
Melbourne, Australia and Ubud, Bali, Indonesia
Your Mac's Specs
2015 MacBook Pro Retina 13" macOSX 10.15.1
I have to admit that, like others the warning that the app I was opening would not be supported on the next macOSbseemed a bit hit or miss when I upgraded to Mojave. That is until the first time I ran OnyX for Mojave. Then all of the 32bit apps did this, but only the first time I launched them.


Sent from my iPad using Mac-Forums
 

IWT


Joined
Jan 23, 2009
Messages
6,572
Reaction score
237
Points
63
Location
Born Scotland. Worked all over UK. Live in Wales
Your Mac's Specs
iMac 5K Retina 27", August 2019, 3.6GHz Intel Core i9, Memory 32GB, 2TB SSD, macOS Mojave 10.14.6
krs said:
Finally - the key question I would like an answer to/comment about:
Will all 32-bit applications run properly on Mojave?
Obviously, I can only quote from my own experience; but every app that worked on recent previous versions of macOS, still works fine on my iMac running macOS Mojave.

Ian
 

krs


Joined
Sep 16, 2008
Messages
1,741
Reaction score
42
Points
48
Location
Canada
Mojave was in my opinion a great OS.
Great to see all these positive comments.

I sort of equate Mojave with SnowLeopard - I think that was a great macOS as well and I stayed on that as long as possible.
I'll probably do the same with Mojave.
 

chscag

Well-known member
Staff member
Admin
Joined
Jan 23, 2008
Messages
60,484
Reaction score
761
Points
113
Location
Keller, Texas
Your Mac's Specs
2017 27" iMac, 10.5" iPad Pro, iPhone 7+, iPhone 8, iPhone 11, Numerous iPods, Catalina
I think we tend to think of Snow Leopard and Mojave as great because they both have something in common: The end of an era.

Snow Leopard: The last version of macOS to support PPC apps.

Mojave: The last version of macOS to support 32 bit apps.

So... when is the next great end of an era coming?

Maybe when Apple switches away from Intel and goes to ARM?
 
Joined
Jul 6, 2008
Messages
784
Reaction score
30
Points
28
I think we tend to think of Snow Leopard and Mojave as great because they both have something in common: The end of an era.

Snow Leopard: The last version of macOS to support PPC apps.

Mojave: The last version of macOS to support 32 bit apps.

So... when is the next great end of an era coming?

Maybe when Apple switches away from Intel and goes to ARM?
I think you're right on the money. Nostalgia is a pretty powerful thing, even when the facts don't match up. It's like when people claim Apple has gone downhill since Steve Jobs died. No, it really hasn't.
 

krs


Joined
Sep 16, 2008
Messages
1,741
Reaction score
42
Points
48
Location
Canada
I think we tend to think of Snow Leopard and Mojave as great because they both have something in common: The end of an era.

Snow Leopard: The last version of macOS to support PPC apps.
Mojave: The last version of macOS to support 32 bit apps.
It's true that SL was the last macOS to support PPC apps, but that isn't what made it "great" for me.
What made it great for me as a user was that Apple designated SL as mostly a 'clean-up" OS at the time and they delivered.
Focus was on improved speed and reliability with only a handful of new features.
It was a solid OS.
 
Joined
Jul 6, 2008
Messages
784
Reaction score
30
Points
28
It's true that SL was the last macOS to support PPC apps, but that isn't what made it "great" for me.
What made it great for me as a user was that Apple designated SL as mostly a 'clean-up" OS at the time and they delivered.
Focus was on improved speed and reliability with only a handful of new features.
It was a solid OS.
I've been using OS X since Tiger (10.4), and honestly every release has seemed solid to me. I guess it depends on what you're doing. Obviously, if you have a favorite app that has issues with a new OS, it will tend to color your perception of the entire OS, even if the majority of apps work fine.
 
Joined
Oct 16, 2010
Messages
13,238
Reaction score
212
Points
63
Location
Brentwood Bay, BC, Canada
I think we tend to think of Snow Leopard and Mojave as great because they both have something in common: The end of an era.

That is an interesting point.

I just wish Apple had left AppleTalk in the Snow Leopard release, I needed it for our networked HP 4ML LaserJet Mac serial printer.




- Patrick
======
 

krs


Joined
Sep 16, 2008
Messages
1,741
Reaction score
42
Points
48
Location
Canada
I've been using OS X since Tiger (10.4), and honestly every release has seemed solid to me.
Tiger was OK - I used that for years on a couple of G4 towers.
But if you go back further, Cheetah was a bit of a disaster and Puma wasn't much better.
And before that, we ran 7.6 and 8.5 for a long time, never 9 as far as I remember.

Here is an interesting article about SL I just came across:
The Mac, The Myth, The Legend: How Snow Leopard became synonymous with reliability - 9to5Mac

PS: Maybe I need to read the article again, but that SL was the last release that supported ppc applications wasn't even mentioned - or only mentioned in passing so that I missed it glancing through the article.
 
Last edited:

krs


Joined
Sep 16, 2008
Messages
1,741
Reaction score
42
Points
48
Location
Canada
Nostalgia is a pretty powerful thing, even when the facts don't match up. It's like when people claim Apple has gone downhill since Steve Jobs died. No, it really hasn't.
We obviously have different opinions, but that is good - the world would be a very boring place if everyone thought the same.

I find that Apple in the pastfocussed on the customer experience and technological advances to support that - profits and an ever increasing bank account followed.
Now the focus is on trying to grow the bank account and stock price and the customer experience and satisfaction plays second fiddle.
 
Joined
Jul 6, 2008
Messages
784
Reaction score
30
Points
28
We obviously have different opinions
I guess so. I just don't tend to put much stock in superlatives when it comes to operating system versions, either positive or negative, as the truth usually lies in the middle. All I can say is that through all those iterations of OS X, I never recall being frustrated with the OS or not being able to accomplish what I needed to accomplish. Maybe my memory is just bad, though. Who knows...
 

krs


Joined
Sep 16, 2008
Messages
1,741
Reaction score
42
Points
48
Location
Canada
The biggest frustration with macOS were the days when a crashed or locked up application would bring down the whole OS and one had to restart the Mac and of course lost anything that hadn't been saved.

Not sure when that problem was addressed, maybe part of macOSX, but for me that was a huge imprevement in those days.

In today's world not so much because I hardly ever have an app crash or lock up, but back then this was a much more common occurrence.
 
Joined
Feb 1, 2011
Messages
2,050
Reaction score
166
Points
63
Location
Sacramento, California
In general, I findthat Apple was much more customer oriented when Steve was around than now.

I find it hysterical when people say things like that about Steve Jobs. I knew Steve Jobs. He didn't give a flying fig about what users wanted. When he returned to Apple he almost immediately came out with the first iMac which had USB ports and nothing else. Users screamed and he said "F-them".

Under Steve Apple jettisoned SCSI, ADB, LocalTalk, Ethernet, Hypercard, AppleWorks, etc. etc. And users cried and kicked their feet.

Steve Jobs couldn't care less about what users said that they wanted, and how upset they were. His motto was "get used to it."
 
Joined
Feb 1, 2011
Messages
2,050
Reaction score
166
Points
63
Location
Sacramento, California
If you are running Mojave, and you don't want to keep on seeing upgrade notices:

Apple menu --> System Preferences --> Software Update --> deselect Automatically keep my Mac up to date

You can also click on Advanced and choose from:

- Check for updates
- Download new updates when available
- Install macOS updates
- Install app updates from the App Store
 
Top