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  1. #1
    Later Macs and the Spinning Beach Ball
    Hello, I am new; hence, I may be in the wrong forum. I have a much discussed subject (I think), but a new (maybe), question related to it. I have a Mac Pro (1.1), which works fine, except for the naughty beach ball. I believe that I have tried most everything found on the web (mainly application removal), to no avail. In some instances, I get temporary relief, never permanent. While typing this post I am constantly interrupted every five seconds, or so.

    My Mac tells me that it will not take an upgrade from the 10.7.5 (Lion), that I am running. I am not looking for further solutions of the removal, or upgrade type. I have to believe that Apple took care of this issue at some point along the Mac line. My question is: At what "series point," and after is this no longer a problem?

    Thank you from a newbie to the forum, but not a newbie in life.

  2. #2
    Later Macs and the Spinning Beach Ball
    harryb2448's Avatar
    Member Since
    Nov 28, 2007
    Location
    Nambucca Heads Australia
    Posts
    25,063
    Your Mac's Specs
    iMac, i7 4GHz, 32GB memory, 1TB Blade, OS X.14.2 Mojave,
    Your Mac Pro 1.1 was released in 2006 so age is setting in.

    What is important is this the 2.66Ghz model or the slower 2GHz? Also how much memory is installed and how full is the boot drive? You can 'hack' to allow later operating systems but this comes with some risk of turning it into a door stop. MacRumours deal with this more nthan is done here.
    Using OS X.7 or later make a bootable USB thumb drive before running Installer!

  3. #3
    Later Macs and the Spinning Beach Ball
    pigoo3's Avatar
    Member Since
    May 20, 2008
    Location
    U.S.
    Posts
    40,181
    Your Mac's Specs
    2011 17" MBP 2.2ghz, 16gig ram, OS 10.11.6
    The spinning beach ball is mainly a computer perfomance issue (CPU performance, GPU performance, logic board design, amount of RAM, etc.).

    As member harryb mentioned...your Mac Pro 1,1 is from 2006 (12 years old). You're going to run into performace issues with any 12 year old computer.

    - Nick
    - Too many "beachballs", read this: Beachballs
    - Computer seems slower than it used to? Read this for some slow computer tips: Speedup
    - Almost full hard drive? Some solutions. Out of Space
    - Apple Battery Info. Battery

  4. #4
    Later Macs and the Spinning Beach Ball
    Rod Sprague's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jun 12, 2011
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia and Ubud, Bali, Indonesia
    Posts
    4,288
    Your Mac's Specs
    MacBook Pro Retina 13" macOSX 10.13.3 beta
    Sad to say the spinning beach ball is a graphic representation of you computer saying, "I'm trying".
    With only 2-2.66 Gb of Random Access Memory (RAM) your device is going to struggle with memory to perform even simple tasks.
    Try not to run more than two applications at a time and check your storage to see if it's reaching capacity. Your computer will use storage as "virtual memory" (RAM) when pushed beyond its resources.
    There are no easy answers to your problem, problems that have been solved by apple in later models and operating systems.
    I would advise that you backup your device using the built in Time Machine application with a view to migrating any valuable files to a newer machine when you current one dies which it will inevitably do.
    In the mean time remove or disable any background apps that may be running and minimize resource requirements by only running one or two apps at a time.
    I used to be conceited but now I'm perfect.

  5. #5
    Later Macs and the Spinning Beach Ball
    Randy B. Singer's Avatar
    Member Since
    Feb 01, 2011
    Location
    Sacramento, California
    Posts
    1,398
    Quote Originally Posted by baugh009 View Post
    Hello, I am new; hence, I may be in the wrong forum. I have a much discussed subject (I think), but a new (maybe), question related to it. I have a Mac Pro (1.1), which works fine, except for the naughty beach ball.
    Quote Originally Posted by baugh009 View Post
    At what "series point," and after is this no longer a problem?
    No version of the Macintosh operating system EVER intrinsically had a rotating beachball problem.

    Has your Mac Pro always had this problem, or is it just recent? If the problem is just recent, then unless you are running software that you didn't run previously, the problem isn't with the specifications of your machine. (i.e. if your Mac ever ran just fine with the amount of RAM currently installed, and with the same exact software setup, then the problem isn't suddenly that you need more RAM.)

    How full is your hard drive and what is it's total capacity? A boot (startup) hard drive that is around 80% full or more is, for all intents and purposes, FULL, and will cause your Mac to run poorly and can even lead to data loss.

    Have you run Hardware Test? Have you run Disk Utility/Repair Disk?

    For lots of potential help, see:

    Macintosh Beachballs!
    Macintosh OS X Beachballs!
    Randy B. Singer
    Co-author of The Macintosh Bible (4th, 5th, and 6th editions)
    Mac OS X Routine Maintenance http://www.macattorney.com/ts.html

  6. #6
    Later Macs and the Spinning Beach Ball
    Rod Sprague's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jun 12, 2011
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia and Ubud, Bali, Indonesia
    Posts
    4,288
    Your Mac's Specs
    MacBook Pro Retina 13" macOSX 10.13.3 beta
    Yes, thanks Randy, I should have included a definition of "nearly full" storage in my reply >20% free is advisable.
    I used to be conceited but now I'm perfect.

  7. #7
    Later Macs and the Spinning Beach Ball
    Randy B. Singer's Avatar
    Member Since
    Feb 01, 2011
    Location
    Sacramento, California
    Posts
    1,398
    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sprague View Post
    Yes, thanks Randy, I should have included a definition of "nearly full" storage in my reply >20% free is advisable.
    Yes, that's a very rough rule of thumb, but not a hard rule.

    I've seen hard drives that were less than 60% full that were so fragmented that they were virtually full, and I've seen hard drives that were over 90% full that were still running fine.

    The thing that is actually important is how much free *continuous space* there is on a rotating disk hard drive for the Mac's system to work with.

    Macintosh Routine Maintenance
    Macintosh OS X Beachballs!
    Item #5 and Note #1
    Randy B. Singer
    Co-author of The Macintosh Bible (4th, 5th, and 6th editions)
    Mac OS X Routine Maintenance http://www.macattorney.com/ts.html

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