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  1. #46
    You're and Your, etc.
    krs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by usagora View Post
    Exactly. English is not as consistently pronounced as written, unlike, say, German, which is almost always pronounced as written (except for imported words from other languages).
    Assuming one knows what the special German letters stand for.

    I had an American friend when I lived in Germany for a few years who could absolutely not be convinced that "Straße" was not pronounced 'strabe'
    Knew her for four years and when I left to come back to Canada it was still 'strabe' for her.

  2. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by krs View Post
    Assuming one knows what the special German letters stand for.

    I had an American friend when I lived in Germany for a few years who could absolutely not be convinced that "Straße" was not pronounced 'strabe'
    Knew her for four years and when I left to come back to Canada it was still 'strabe' for her.
    Yes, obviously I mean pronounced as written according to the alphabet of the German language
    -Jonathan
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  3. #48
    You're and Your, etc.
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    My main issue is the use of the word "of" instead of "have". For example, "I could of done that". I mean, you wouldn't write "of you got the time please?" would you?

    Also, the use of there instead of their or they're.

    Anyway, how many (like me) re-read their posts over and over to ensure no mistakes and still worry they've made a howler?????
    Johann Gambolputty de Von Ausfern....of Ülm

  4. #49
    You're and Your, etc.
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    I check but still miss spelling mistakes which is down to bad typing rather than not knowing (I hope!), and I do punctuate texts. Not to pull the heart strings but I had a benign brain tumour removed in 2010 and my spelling has taken a hit (I also suffer aphasia, especially when tired or stressed).
    Sue

    If the shoe fits, buy it in every colour.

  5. #50
    You're and Your, etc.
    MacInWin's Avatar
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    My pet peeve is "try and," as in, "I am going to try and be a better person." No, you might try TO be a better person, but nobody will ever "and be." Not a verb.
    Jake

  6. #51
    You're and Your, etc.
    toMACsh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickyr View Post
    My main issue is the use of the word "of" instead of "have". For example, "I could of done that". I mean, you wouldn't write "of you got the time please?" would you?

    Also, the use of there instead of their or they're.
    On the first one above, when written out, those would be contractions: could've, should've, would've. When spoken, it often sounds like "of".

    I'm right there with you on #2.

    Quote Originally Posted by MacInWin View Post
    My pet peeve is "try and," as in, "I am going to try and be a better person." No, you might try TO be a better person, but nobody will ever "and be." Not a verb.
    What about the "splits"? (like Star Trek's "to boldly go...")


    Another one I try to correct when I say it is using "there's" when it should be "there are".

  7. #52
    You're and Your, etc.
    MacInWin's Avatar
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    Yeah, the split infinitives are bothersome, although, as long as there is not ambiguity about what it means, it seems to be becoming acceptable. "To boldly go" is ambiguous (is the "bold" in the going, or are they going with boldness?), so that one is bad. It is difficult, sometimes, to completely avoid (see?) splitting an infinitive without becoming a bit awkward. In that sentence, "completely to avoid splitting" makes the avoidance seem to be the completion, whereas "to avoid completely splitting" seems to pair the completion with "splitting." I suppose one could simply redo the entire sentence to be "It is difficult, sometimes, to avoid altogether ever splitting an infinitive without it becoming awkward." I suspect a good proofreader or editor would do exactly that change!
    Jake

  8. #53
    You're and Your, etc.
    IWT's Avatar
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    Oh there so many rules, many, most, very helpful in that they avoid ambiguity as Jake illustrated.

    Prepositions should never appear at the end of a sentence; but as Winston Churchill is alleged to have said:

    "Prepositions are the wrong words to end a sentence with"

    Ian
    Ian

  9. #54
    You're and Your, etc.
    MacInWin's Avatar
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    That is something up with which one should not put.
    Jake

  10. #55
    You're and Your, etc.
    IWT's Avatar
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    Exactly, Jake. If only I understood what you were saying Point made!

    Ian
    Ian

  11. #56
    You're and Your, etc.
    pm-r's Avatar
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    No, you might try TO be a better person, but nobody will ever "and be." Not a verb.
    Ahhh yes..., the old "to be or not to be" comes to mind".



    - Patrick
    ======

  12. #57
    You're and Your, etc.
    IWT's Avatar
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    Ahhh yes..., the old "to be or not to be" comes to mind".
    Or as the medics say: "TB or not TB, that is the consumption".

    Ian
    Ian

  13. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by MacInWin View Post
    "To boldly go" is ambiguous (is the "bold" in the going, or are they going with boldness?)
    Hmm. Not seeing the ambiguity in that example. What other way could that be understood than "to go in a bold manner"? I don't see the distinction between the two options you have in parentheses.
    -Jonathan
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  14. #59
    You're and Your, etc.
    MacInWin's Avatar
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    Jonathan, one could put the boldly first, as in "boldly to go" in which case the boldness is in just going at all, even if you are timid when you get going. Just the act of starting to go was bold. Or you could put the boldly last, as in "to go boldly" in which case you're bold as you go, even if you might have started out timidly making a slow decision, or even being forced to go. Hence, "to boldly go" is ambiguous. You don't know where the boldness should apply.
    Jake

  15. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by MacInWin View Post
    Jonathan, one could put the boldly first, as in "boldly to go" in which case the boldness is in just going at all, even if you are timid when you get going. Just the act of starting to go was bold. Or you could put the boldly last, as in "to go boldly" in which case you're bold as you go, even if you might have started out timidly making a slow decision, or even being forced to go. Hence, "to boldly go" is ambiguous. You don't know where the boldness should apply.
    I really don't think we can warrant reading that much into the syntax. That's what context is for. But even by itself, I highly doubt most people would think "to boldly go" meant something other than "to go in a bold manner"--the meaning you're saying is only clear in the "to go boldly" construction. I see no difference in meaning between the two constructions. "boldly to go" sounds awkward or perhaps even archaic.

    I honestly can't think of any split infinitives that would confuse me as to the intended meaning. It's usually a matter of style. Sometimes splitting the infinitive sounds a bit better and sometimes not splitting it does. Often splitting the infinitive gives a slight emphasis to the adverb. Sometimes splitting an infinitive would sound completely awkward, such as "Do you have to so loudly talk?" But the meaning is still clear.
    Last edited by usagora; 09-05-2019 at 05:26 PM.
    -Jonathan
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