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  1. #31
    Apple is making it more difficult to ignore update notifications
    usagora's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chscag View Post
    I think we tend to think of Snow Leopard and Mojave as great because they both have something in common: The end of an era.

    Snow Leopard: The last version of macOS to support PPC apps.

    Mojave: The last version of macOS to support 32 bit apps.

    So... when is the next great end of an era coming?

    Maybe when Apple switches away from Intel and goes to ARM?
    I think you're right on the money. Nostalgia is a pretty powerful thing, even when the facts don't match up. It's like when people claim Apple has gone downhill since Steve Jobs died. No, it really hasn't.
    Jonathan
    2019 iMac (27"/i9/64GB) | 2012 iMac (27"/i5/16GB) | 2013 MacBook Air (13"/i5/4GB) | iPhone SE (2020) | Apple Watch Series 4

  2. #32
    Apple is making it more difficult to ignore update notifications
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    Quote Originally Posted by chscag View Post
    I think we tend to think of Snow Leopard and Mojave as great because they both have something in common: The end of an era.

    Snow Leopard: The last version of macOS to support PPC apps.
    Mojave: The last version of macOS to support 32 bit apps.
    It's true that SL was the last macOS to support PPC apps, but that isn't what made it "great" for me.
    What made it great for me as a user was that Apple designated SL as mostly a 'clean-up" OS at the time and they delivered.
    Focus was on improved speed and reliability with only a handful of new features.
    It was a solid OS.

  3. #33
    Apple is making it more difficult to ignore update notifications
    usagora's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by krs View Post
    It's true that SL was the last macOS to support PPC apps, but that isn't what made it "great" for me.
    What made it great for me as a user was that Apple designated SL as mostly a 'clean-up" OS at the time and they delivered.
    Focus was on improved speed and reliability with only a handful of new features.
    It was a solid OS.
    I've been using OS X since Tiger (10.4), and honestly every release has seemed solid to me. I guess it depends on what you're doing. Obviously, if you have a favorite app that has issues with a new OS, it will tend to color your perception of the entire OS, even if the majority of apps work fine.
    Jonathan
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  4. #34
    Apple is making it more difficult to ignore update notifications
    pm-r's Avatar
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    I think we tend to think of Snow Leopard and Mojave as great because they both have something in common: The end of an era.

    That is an interesting point.

    I just wish Apple had left AppleTalk in the Snow Leopard release, I needed it for our networked HP 4ML LaserJet Mac serial printer.




    - Patrick
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  5. #35
    Apple is making it more difficult to ignore update notifications
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    Quote Originally Posted by usagora View Post
    I've been using OS X since Tiger (10.4), and honestly every release has seemed solid to me.
    Tiger was OK - I used that for years on a couple of G4 towers.
    But if you go back further, Cheetah was a bit of a disaster and Puma wasn't much better.
    And before that, we ran 7.6 and 8.5 for a long time, never 9 as far as I remember.

    Here is an interesting article about SL I just came across:
    The Mac, The Myth, The Legend: How Snow Leopard became synonymous with reliability - 9to5Mac

    PS: Maybe I need to read the article again, but that SL was the last release that supported ppc applications wasn't even mentioned - or only mentioned in passing so that I missed it glancing through the article.
    Last edited by krs; 05-31-2020 at 11:19 PM.

  6. #36
    Apple is making it more difficult to ignore update notifications
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    Quote Originally Posted by usagora View Post
    Nostalgia is a pretty powerful thing, even when the facts don't match up. It's like when people claim Apple has gone downhill since Steve Jobs died. No, it really hasn't.
    We obviously have different opinions, but that is good - the world would be a very boring place if everyone thought the same.

    I find that Apple in the pastfocussed on the customer experience and technological advances to support that - profits and an ever increasing bank account followed.
    Now the focus is on trying to grow the bank account and stock price and the customer experience and satisfaction plays second fiddle.

  7. #37
    Apple is making it more difficult to ignore update notifications
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    Quote Originally Posted by krs View Post
    We obviously have different opinions
    I guess so. I just don't tend to put much stock in superlatives when it comes to operating system versions, either positive or negative, as the truth usually lies in the middle. All I can say is that through all those iterations of OS X, I never recall being frustrated with the OS or not being able to accomplish what I needed to accomplish. Maybe my memory is just bad, though. Who knows...
    Jonathan
    2019 iMac (27"/i9/64GB) | 2012 iMac (27"/i5/16GB) | 2013 MacBook Air (13"/i5/4GB) | iPhone SE (2020) | Apple Watch Series 4

  8. #38
    Apple is making it more difficult to ignore update notifications
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    The biggest frustration with macOS were the days when a crashed or locked up application would bring down the whole OS and one had to restart the Mac and of course lost anything that hadn't been saved.

    Not sure when that problem was addressed, maybe part of macOSX, but for me that was a huge imprevement in those days.

    In today's world not so much because I hardly ever have an app crash or lock up, but back then this was a much more common occurrence.

  9. #39
    Apple is making it more difficult to ignore update notifications
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    Quote Originally Posted by krs View Post
    In general, I findthat Apple was much more customer oriented when Steve was around than now.

    I find it hysterical when people say things like that about Steve Jobs. I knew Steve Jobs. He didn't give a flying fig about what users wanted. When he returned to Apple he almost immediately came out with the first iMac which had USB ports and nothing else. Users screamed and he said "F-them".

    Under Steve Apple jettisoned SCSI, ADB, LocalTalk, Ethernet, Hypercard, AppleWorks, etc. etc. And users cried and kicked their feet.

    Steve Jobs couldn't care less about what users said that they wanted, and how upset they were. His motto was "get used to it."
    Randy B. Singer
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  10. #40
    Apple is making it more difficult to ignore update notifications
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    If you are running Mojave, and you don't want to keep on seeing upgrade notices:

    Apple menu --> System Preferences --> Software Update --> deselect Automatically keep my Mac up to date

    You can also click on Advanced and choose from:

    - Check for updates
    - Download new updates when available
    - Install macOS updates
    - Install app updates from the App Store
    Randy B. Singer
    Co-author of The Macintosh Bible (4th, 5th, and 6th editions)
    Mac OS X Routine Maintenance http://www.macattorney.com/ts.html

  11. #41
    Apple is making it more difficult to ignore update notifications
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randy B. Singer View Post
    I find it hysterical when people say things like that about Steve Jobs. I knew Steve Jobs. He didn't give a flying fig about what users wanted. When he returned to Apple he almost immediately came out with the first iMac which had USB ports and nothing else. Users screamed and he said "F-them".

    Under Steve Apple jettisoned SCSI, ADB, LocalTalk, Ethernet, Hypercard, AppleWorks, etc. etc. And users cried and kicked their feet.

    Steve Jobs couldn't care less about what users said that they wanted, and how upset they were. His motto was "get used to it."
    I didn't know Steve personally, what I remember at the time that he seemed to be a perfectionist driving his staff to exhaustion.
    But Apple must have done a lot of things right after he came back - at that time Apple was about to go under and, the perception at least, was that he was very instrumental in turning that around.
    I have never used an iMac or many of the capabilities you mentioned Apple jettisoned, so my perception is probably different than many other Mac users.

  12. #42
    Apple is making it more difficult to ignore update notifications
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randy B. Singer View Post
    If you are running Mojave, and you don't want to keep on seeing upgrade notices:

    Apple menu --> System Preferences --> Software Update --> deselect Automatically keep my Mac up to date

    You can also click on Advanced and choose from:

    - Check for updates
    - Download new updates when available
    - Install macOS updates
    - Install app updates from the App Store
    Thanks,
    I actually thought that option was turned off because it showed a minus sign in the check box against "Automatically keep my Mac up to date". But that obviously means something different.

  13. #43
    Apple is making it more difficult to ignore update notifications
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randy B. Singer View Post
    I knew Steve Jobs.
    In what capacity?
    Jonathan
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  14. #44
    Apple is making it more difficult to ignore update notifications
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    It seems to me that each time there is a major shift in the Mac ecosystem the general conclusion is that pale has lost its customer-centered focus. Remember the storm when the shift was made from Apple II to Mac? I guarantee you there were loyal customers who felt that the folks in Cupertino had lost focus. There certainly was that kind of a reaction in the PPC to Intel transition.

    As far as the whole 32-bit message is concerned I have a suspicion why some people seem to be seeing that message once while others see the same message more than once. I haven't researched it yet but here's what I think happens once that message was introduced:

    1. The first time a 32 -bit app was run the message appears. This may date to High Sierra but I'm sure it happened in Mojave. On subsequent launches of an app the message didn't appear but reappears if another 32- bit app is run.

    2. If an app had previously triggered the 32 - bit warning, the warning doesn't appear again unless there has been some minor update to that program (e.g. bug fixes that don't necessarily bring things to 64 - bit operation).

    It's part two that I haven't researched yet.



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  15. #45
    Apple is making it more difficult to ignore update notifications
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slydude View Post
    It seems to me that each time there is a major shift in the Mac ecosystem the general conclusion is that pale has lost its customer-centered focus. Remember the storm when the shift was made from Apple II to Mac? I guarantee you there were loyal customers who felt that the folks in Cupertino had lost focus. There certainly was that kind of a reaction in the PPC to Intel transition.

    As far as the whole 32-bit message is concerned I have a suspicion why some people seem to be seeing that message once while others see the same message more than once. I haven't researched it yet but here's what I think happens once that message was introduced:

    1. The first time a 32 -bit app was run the message appears. This may date to High Sierra but I'm sure it happened in Mojave. On subsequent launches of an app the message didn't appear but reappears if another 32- bit app is run.

    2. If an app had previously triggered the 32 - bit warning, the warning doesn't appear again unless there has been some minor update to that program (e.g. bug fixes that don't necessarily bring things to 64 - bit operation).

    It's part two that I haven't researched yet.



    Another thing that may affect the reappearance is if someone does a NVRAM or an SMC reset? Or maybe even certain "cleaner" apps?
    Please backup. Everything has a life cycle, unexpected and warning free. Nothing will last as long as you want it to.
    PS: When there is an accident or error, is the tool to blame or is the fool to blame?

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