Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 24 of 24
  1. #16
    how to Transfer Time Machine
    MacInWin's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jan 01, 2009
    Location
    Winchester, VA
    Posts
    7,941
    Your Mac's Specs
    MBP 15" Mid 2015, iPhone 11 Pro, an iMac, plus ATVs, AWatch, MacMini
    Rep Power
    29
    All you need to do is go into Backups.backupdb/yourComputerName/ and you'll be presented with a set of folders named in yyyy-mm-dd-hhmmss format. Simply locate the most recent (or sort them - the most recent will be at the bottom, thanks to its name) and copy it elsewhere. You can then delete the Backups.backupdb folder or wipe the entire drive as you wish.
    That is NOT how it works. What you see in any given date folder is a collection of what are mostly links to the last time the file/folder changed. If you copy that link somewhere else and delete the Backups.Backupdb folder, you will end up with broken links and not many usable files. If you really want to know how backups work, start here: Time Machine: 1 How it works, or fails to – The Eclectic Light Company

    There are about a dozen, or more, descriptions of how TM works and why you cannot treat them like just another set of files. After a set of backups, the links will be long chains of links, maybe going all the way back to the original backup for files that are unchanged.

    You can copy the entire backups.backupdb folder, but it will take a VERY long time to complete as all of the links have to be copied over. You can use a cloner, as I said, which is easier, but maybe not too much faster.

    Here's the hint. The name of the backup folder is "backups.backupdb." Your "backups" are in a database of backups (hence the "db" in the second section). Don't mess with the internals of the database or the integrity of the databas will be destroyed and you lose it all.
    Jake

  2. #17
    how to Transfer Time Machine
    MacInWin's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jan 01, 2009
    Location
    Winchester, VA
    Posts
    7,941
    Your Mac's Specs
    MBP 15" Mid 2015, iPhone 11 Pro, an iMac, plus ATVs, AWatch, MacMini
    Rep Power
    29
    Another great description for how TM works comes from James Pond (Pondini) a true wizard who passed away all too soon: How Time Machine Works its Magic
    Jake

  3. #18
    how to Transfer Time Machine

    Member Since
    Mar 25, 2013
    Posts
    121
    Rep Power
    8
    Thanks Jake will check it out!

  4. #19
    how to Transfer Time Machine
    MacInWin's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jan 01, 2009
    Location
    Winchester, VA
    Posts
    7,941
    Your Mac's Specs
    MBP 15" Mid 2015, iPhone 11 Pro, an iMac, plus ATVs, AWatch, MacMini
    Rep Power
    29
    Something very strange going on with the board. Post 15 repeated as Post 18, I responded, then Post 18 changed to something entirely different.

    Is the board failing again?
    Last edited by MacInWin; 05-31-2020 at 10:16 PM.
    Jake

  5. #20
    how to Transfer Time Machine
    Rod's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jun 12, 2011
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia and Ubud, Bali, Indonesia
    Posts
    5,897
    Your Mac's Specs
    2015 MacBook Pro Retina 13" macOSX 10.15.1
    Rep Power
    14
    Time Machine is not an archive, it is an incremental backup and restore application. I have seldom had one that goes back more than a year just like I don't keep emails older than a year but, I do have archived material that goes back 10 years.
    So I would start a new backup on the 4Tb if you find you do not need anything off the old 1Tb in say 6 months, erase it and reuse it.


    Sent from my iPhone using Mac-Forums
    Don't be an April Fool: WORLD BACKUP DAY MARCH 31st

  6. #21
    how to Transfer Time Machine
    MacInWin's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jan 01, 2009
    Location
    Winchester, VA
    Posts
    7,941
    Your Mac's Specs
    MBP 15" Mid 2015, iPhone 11 Pro, an iMac, plus ATVs, AWatch, MacMini
    Rep Power
    29
    Rod, if I may, the definition of archive, from dictionary.com says this:
    a long-term storage device, as a disk or magnetic tape, or a computer directory or folder that contains copies of files for backup or future reference.
    Apple describes Time Machine with this:
    You can use Time Machine, the built-in backup feature of your Mac, to automatically back up all of your files, including apps, music, photos, email, documents, and system files. When you have a backup, you can restore files from your backup if the original files are ever deleted from your Mac, or the hard disk (or SSD) in your Mac is erased or replaced.
    From those two statements, it would seem to me that Time Machine quintessentially an archive for a Mac's data.

    Cloners, such as CCC or SD, and synchronizers like Chronosync can be configured to both clone and archive, but TM is designed to do both inherently.

    Just my $0.02.

    As for how long one uses any given archive, that is a personal or business decision. From my observation over 40 years in the technology business, the storage devices and technology change so dynamically that any long term storage would need to be refreshed every few years. In the personal computer space, the cassette tape was replaced by floppy disk, then Winchester hard drives, then just hard drives in general, then storage cards, now external SSDs. But storage decays over time, so a true archive needs to be refreshed and moved to more modern storage. I seriously doubt many of us could restore data from a cassette tape today, even if the interface between the player and the machine could be created. And does anybody use the old compact flash cards any more? You know, the original 1.24" by 1.5" cards. And if you have an old IDE, PATA, or SCSI hard drive, getting it attached to today's machines is not a trivial task.

    So as technology moves along, what I do is to move my "archive" stuff to newer tech. I had photos that I stored on CF cards from the camera in which they were taken, moved them to the hard drives of the day, copied them to backup drives in case one failed. When drives went from PATA to SATA, I moved the photos to there for storage and access. Now I have them stored on RAID array in a NAS, backed up to a second RAID array NAS. One moves with the times.
    Jake

  7. #22
    how to Transfer Time Machine
    Rod's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jun 12, 2011
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia and Ubud, Bali, Indonesia
    Posts
    5,897
    Your Mac's Specs
    2015 MacBook Pro Retina 13" macOSX 10.15.1
    Rep Power
    14
    Yes the tech certainly has changed. Your first quoted definition hits the nail on the head though, "a long term storage device," so I suppose it depends on what one defines as "long term". I have digitalised photos of my wedding, 41 years ago today, saved on a dedicated Photos HD but I create a new TM backup (after erasing the old one) at each new macOS version.

    About 10 years ago I tried to simplify my daughter's backups by buying her a 1Tb (big then) AC powered external HD to backup her old MBP. The idea was she could just plug it in and allow TM to run whenever and she would never have to worry about her laptop crashing. This was as it turned out a simplistic and erroneous assumption. Changes in OS versions, filing systems, native apps including TM itself rendered the thing useless when the time came to use it. Many files were corrupted or unreadable and many photos were reduced to thumbnails only. It took days to save the data that could be saved.
    Now she saves her photos as jpegs onto dedicated HD's labelled by year, not data bases or application libraries. That in my mind is an archive.
    Last edited by Rod; 06-01-2020 at 08:23 PM.
    Don't be an April Fool: WORLD BACKUP DAY MARCH 31st

  8. #23
    how to Transfer Time Machine
    MacInWin's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jan 01, 2009
    Location
    Winchester, VA
    Posts
    7,941
    Your Mac's Specs
    MBP 15" Mid 2015, iPhone 11 Pro, an iMac, plus ATVs, AWatch, MacMini
    Rep Power
    29
    Yep, Rod, that is one of the definitions of an archive. I would, however, caution your daughter to occasionally review those archives for readability and if there are ANY issues, immediately copy the archive to new hardware.

    On my soapbox...

    Backup and archiving are never one-and-done, or set-and-forget. In my past I was the head of major data centers and we had an active backup policy that made backups, tested that they worked, stored them offsite, rotated the media and tested it between uses, made multiple copies and ensure that we had install media for all operating system and third party components, plus all dedicated application source code to rebuild the system in emergency. We even had a data-center-in-a-box (DCIAB) where we had everything but the hardware to re-establish the center in case of emergency. As a military facility, we could have authority to commandeer a center similar to ours in a national emergency, take the DCIAB there and run our system until we could be restored.

    So a backup plan is not static, but dynamic. A backup that won't boot is useless if you planned for it to boot. Useless if you cannot read the files you need/want to restore. And the only way to know it is not useless is to test it, and test it regularly.

    Off my soapbox, thanks for listening...
    Jake

  9. #24
    how to Transfer Time Machine
    Rod's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jun 12, 2011
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia and Ubud, Bali, Indonesia
    Posts
    5,897
    Your Mac's Specs
    2015 MacBook Pro Retina 13" macOSX 10.15.1
    Rep Power
    14
    I definitely advocate reviewing, that was the problem in the first instance. Keeping it plain and simple, folders and subfolders.
    I keep all my text files in MS Word format, photos as tiff or jpeg.
    Don't be an April Fool: WORLD BACKUP DAY MARCH 31st

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-02-2013, 07:47 AM
  2. Time machine backup transfer from G4 to i3 - problems!
    By WaveRiderUK in forum macOS - Operating System
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-20-2011, 05:36 PM
  3. Manual transfer from Time Machine
    By Hann in forum Apple Notebooks
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-25-2010, 08:59 AM
  4. Transfer Time Machine Backup from Time Capsule to External Hard Drive
    By Aphracer in forum Other Hardware and Peripherals
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-28-2010, 12:48 AM
  5. Transfer data from G5 to new Intel using Time Machine
    By Nitrix in forum macOS - Operating System
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-06-2009, 06:00 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •