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  1. #16
    Refurbished Macs any recommendations UK
    MacInWin's Avatar
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    Your Mac's Specs
    MBP 15" Mid 2015, iPhone XS, an iMac, plus ATVs, AWatch, MacMini
    I cannot speak for Lightroom, I don't use it. But for iTunes, the answer is yes, you can put the database on the external. Open iTunes, then Preferences and look under Advanced for the full path to the iTunes Music database. Now go there in Finder and copy that database to where you want it on the external. Now go back to iTunes/Preferences/Advanced and Change... to point to the new location. Test that it works well, then you can delete the original location.

    You may be able to do something similar in Lightroom.

    Make backups before doing any of this so that if it doesn't work, you can restore it as it was before you started.
    Jake

  2. #17
    Thank you Jake, I will have a look at that. It is also possible with LR I have discovered. Isn't it funny how you just seem to trust the HD on your computer, up to a point, but get nervous transferring everything onto an external drive. Well I do anyways! I will of course make another backup of everything before I commit.

  3. #18
    Refurbished Macs any recommendations UK
    Randy B. Singer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Konda View Post
    Update:
    So far I have managed to slim down my hard drive from being almost full to having 106Gb available now.
    Note that what is important isn't just how much free hard drive space you have, but rather how much free CONTIGUOUS space you have. The Mac's system uses chunks of contiguous hard drive space to work with. Read the links that I gave you.
    Randy B. Singer
    Co-author of The Macintosh Bible (4th, 5th, and 6th editions)
    Mac OS X Routine Maintenance http://www.macattorney.com/ts.html

  4. #19
    Will do Randy. I have been working my way through it, I will check that part out again.
    Thanks
    Dave

  5. #20
    Refurbished Macs any recommendations UK

    Member Since
    Dec 11, 2010
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    Chicago
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    1,770
    Your Mac's Specs
    late 2012 mini w/SSD
    If you move anything to an external, and delete the original, just remember to make a different backup -you don't want to lose anything.

  6. #21
    Refurbished Macs any recommendations UK
    IWT's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jan 23, 2009
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    Born in Scotland, Worked in Scotland then England, Now live in Wales
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    Late 2015 5K 27-inch Retina iMac, 4GHz i7, 32GB RAM, 1TB Flash Drive, macOS High Sierra 10.13.6
    Quote Originally Posted by gsahli View Post
    If you move anything to an external, and delete the original, just remember to make a different backup -you don't want to lose anything.
    Absolutely! Move what you like, but remember that will become your one and only source of that data. So clone or otherwise Backup all of your External Hard Drives which you use for this purpose.

    Ian
    Ian

  7. #22
    Refurbished Macs any recommendations UK
    pm-r's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randy B. Singer View Post
    Note that what is important isn't just how much free hard drive space you have, but rather how much free CONTIGUOUS space you have. The Mac's system uses chunks of contiguous hard drive space to work with. Read the links that I gave you.

    It's nice, if and when all data arrives in a nice CONTIGUOUS space and nicely organized, yet Mac users are so often told that they never need to defragment their data. I would say that is only partly true and depends on circumstances.

    Some articles that explain this show how to help and understand or maybe fix the problem:
    Tech 101: Should You ‘Defrag’ Your Mac’s HDD?
    Defragmentation is the process of reading files, then rewriting them so that single files are written on the spinning platter in such a way that the drive head doesn’t need to move back and forth. A file that may have been splattered all over the platter is placed in a contiguous band, so loading apps and files speeds up.

    OS X El Capitan

    Why Macs usually don’t need defragging
    There’s a reason why Macs typically don’t need defragging — the Mac OS X file system is designed differently than Microsoft’s, and it automatically defragments files. Since OS X 10.3 “Panther”, the file system has used something called Hot File Adaptive Clustering (HFC) to perform that process.
    https://blog.macsales.com/34027-tech...frag-a-mac-hdd

    PS: Don't ever even consider defragging a Mac's hard drive without having at least one current and confirmed working back up.





    - Patrick
    ======

  8. #23
    Refurbished Macs any recommendations UK
    chscag's Avatar
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    Jan 23, 2008
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    Keller, Texas
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    Your Mac's Specs
    2017 27" iMac, 10.5" iPad Pro, iPhone 6s+, iPhone 7+, Numerous iPods, Mojave
    Patrick:

    For years I used the handy iDefrag program to defrag my internal hard drives and it worked well. Although the Mac file system is more resistant to fragmentation than the PC file systems, Mac hard drives do fragment over time especially as drive space begins to diminish.

    However, nowadays with PCIe and SSD drives, defragmentation is not recommended. I'm not sure what harm can come about if you attempt to defrag those drives, but even the developer of iDefrag warned against using his program on them. As a matter of fact, iDefrag and iPartition are no longer being developed.

  9. #24
    I gave iDefrag a go and ran a full defrag of my HD. It took about 6 hours to complete. It does seem a bit more responsive now and also boots up in around 30 seconds, which is a bit quicker than it did beforehand. I think it was worth the small cost involved.

  10. #25
    Refurbished Macs any recommendations UK
    Randy B. Singer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pm-r View Post

    Some articles that explain this show how to help and understand or maybe fix the problem:
    I gave a citation to my own Web site earlier in this very thread, where I explain this problem in great detail and give several citations to other authority.

    OS X Maintenance And Troubleshooting
    OS X Maintenance And Troubleshooting
    Item #5 and Note #1
    Randy B. Singer
    Co-author of The Macintosh Bible (4th, 5th, and 6th editions)
    Mac OS X Routine Maintenance http://www.macattorney.com/ts.html

  11. #26
    Refurbished Macs any recommendations UK
    pm-r's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randy B. Singer View Post
    I gave a citation to my own Web site earlier in this very thread, where I explain this problem in great detail and give several citations to other authority.

    OS X Maintenance And Troubleshooting
    OS X Maintenance And Troubleshooting
    Item #5 and Note #1

    And maybe some should bookmark those article sites Randy and use them as standard fix or maintenance articles.

    And a simple clone backup, then erase and restore can often get all data back into a decent organized de-fractured structure and quicker than any defrag software can do a similar thing.






    - Patrick
    ======

  12. #27
    Refurbished Macs any recommendations UK
    Randy B. Singer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pm-r View Post
    And a simple clone backup, then erase and restore can often get all data back into a decent organized de-fractured structure and quicker than any defrag software can do a similar thing.
    My site covers that too. Cloning and restoring will indeed defragment your hard drive. However, it won't optimize your drive, and the Mac OS likes certain files in certain places. In some cases simply cloning and restoring will actually slow your computer down.
    Randy B. Singer
    Co-author of The Macintosh Bible (4th, 5th, and 6th editions)
    Mac OS X Routine Maintenance http://www.macattorney.com/ts.html

  13. #28
    Refurbished Macs any recommendations UK
    MacInWin's Avatar
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    And for anyone reading this and not going to Randy's site to read the article, there is a clear warning there:
    WARNING: You should never, ever, defragment a solid state hard drive (SSD) (Most recent Macbook's use SSD's for their speed and light weight. Several other Mac models, including recent desktop models, occasionally have SSD's for their speed.) or a hybrid drive (hybrid drives are sort of a combination of an SSD and a rotating disk hard drive).
    Should You Defrag an SSD?
    http://www.coriolis-systems.com/blog...gmentation.php
    SSD's themselves need no periodic maintenance. There is built-in software in recent versions of OS X called TRIM that keeps them running at peak performance:
    Trim (computing) - Wikipedia
    The most common reason for not defragging an SSD is that it generates a lot of read/write actions to the SSD, and the life of SSDs is measured in the number of read/writes. So defragging will shorten the life of the SSD. Also, defragging an SSD will not result in major improvement in speed because defragging is a way to lessen the latency delay on a spinning drive while the heads move and then wait for the proper sector to come under the head to be read/written to. In an SSD, the latency is exactly the same on every block and since nothing is moving, the latency is very, vary small in any event.

    So, don't defrag an SSD, ever.
    Jake

  14. #29
    Refurbished Macs any recommendations UK
    pm-r's Avatar
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    So, don't defrag an SSD, ever.

    The extra warning never hurts Jake.





    - Patrick
    ======

  15. #30
    Refurbished Macs any recommendations UK
    pm-r's Avatar
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    In some cases simply cloning and restoring will actually slow your computer down.

    I guess anything is possible but I have never had that happen and the results have always been positive and speedier.





    - Patrick
    ======

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