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  1. #16
    What would you run on your Mac if OS X suddenly became unavailable?

    Member Since
    Aug 02, 2008
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    29
    Probably Linux, but I am a bloody beginner when it comes to compiling programs and editing config files...
    The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.
    Bertrand Russell

  2. #17
    What would you run on your Mac if OS X suddenly became unavailable?

    Member Since
    Feb 25, 2009
    Posts
    83
    I like the Parker "Jotter" ballpoint pens, w/black ink fine tip. I also really like the Papermate Logo II mechanical pencils in .5mm, HB lead.

  3. #18
    What would you run on your Mac if OS X suddenly became unavailable?
    AliOop's Avatar
    Member Since
    Sep 03, 2009
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    132
    Specs:
    MacBook Pro.
    Quote Originally Posted by heiko_s View Post
    Probably Linux, but I am a bloody beginner when it comes to compiling programs and editing config files...
    A mini lesson on installing programs for Linux: Keep to programs made for your distro. Use only those in the repos for the distro you are using. Not only is it easy to install and delete programs but it's safer as well.

    I too could never wrap my brain around compiling tar balls (compressed programs from non-approved sources). So I never used them. On the other hand, programs from approved sources (official repos) are no sweat to work with. Most distros have GUIs to do all the work for you. Just point and click.

  4. #19
    What would you run on your Mac if OS X suddenly became unavailable?
    osxx's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jan 19, 2008
    Location
    houston texas
    Posts
    4,695
    Specs:
    09 MBP 8GB ram 500GB HD OS 10.9 32B iPad 4 32GB iPhone 5 iOs7 2TB TC Apple TV3
    Ubuntu or Mint

  5. #20
    What would you run on your Mac if OS X suddenly became unavailable?
    AliOop's Avatar
    Member Since
    Sep 03, 2009
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    132
    Specs:
    MacBook Pro.
    Quote Originally Posted by osxx View Post
    Ubuntu or Mint
    Both are very good distros. And both use the Debian package manager method to do the work of installing and deleting packages. One has the option of using either a terminal or the GUI (Synaptic) version to do the work. I love Debian based distros. It so darn easy to mange your Linux OS. It really is.

    As to the two you mentioned, Ubuntu is a great distro and easy to tweak. It prompts you when needed. Lots and lots of forum support. But for my money, Linux Mint is top notch especially for anyone new to Linux. While you'll have to install certain things in Ubuntu - which it will prompt you to do - Mint has it all. Very little to add to it. Truly one of the few 'works out of the box' distro out there.

    Now if you really want to get geeky, try the granddaddy all Debian distros are based on - Why Debian, of course. A bit more work and hair pulling and gnashing of teeth to do. But not all that much more. Of course it's the package manager that makes all this possible. Just can't beat the Debain package manager. Bar none! EX: Via the terminal, 'apt-get install package'. apt-get delete package'. Of course the GUI (Synaptic) is just a matter of point and click. I'm currently using Mepis on my HP laptop. Another Debian based distro worthy of your consideration.

    And while I'm at it, download/install packages designed and provided for the Linux you are using. Stay away from those nasty tarballs. Ugh!

    Visit Distrowatch for a listing of just about all the distros available - hundreds!. From the most popular to the most obscure one man operations. distrowatch.com

  6. #21
    What would you run on your Mac if OS X suddenly became unavailable?
    louishen's Avatar
    Member Since
    Oct 22, 2007
    Location
    London
    Posts
    8,968
    Specs:
    Mac Mini Core i7 2012 | White 2009 MacBook 2 Ghz | 733 Mhz G4 Quicksilver
    Ubuntu for me, but Adobe better port Creative Suite to LInux if a meteor hits Cupertino and somehow wipes out the only copy of OSX,s source code
    Member of the Month September 2008 & August 2012 | Found advice useful? use the rep system

  7. #22
    What would you run on your Mac if OS X suddenly became unavailable?

    Member Since
    Apr 05, 2012
    Posts
    21
    I run all sorts of Linux distros on various computers and just moved to OS X recently on my own laptop. Loving it so far and the similarities with Linux are pretty impressive. Easy to switch from one to the other. Without OS X I would just revert back to all my Linux distros, mostly Debian based but a few oddities like Fuduntu thrown in for fun.

  8. #23
    What would you run on your Mac if OS X suddenly became unavailable?
    vansmith's Avatar
    Member Since
    Oct 19, 2008
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    19,395
    Specs:
    2012 13" MBP (2.5 i5, 8GB)
    Quote Originally Posted by AliOop View Post
    A mini lesson on installing programs for Linux: Keep to programs made for your distro. Use only those in the repos for the distro you are using. Not only is it easy to install and delete programs but it's safer as well.
    How so? Package repositories don't have everything and I'm not going to wait for someone to add it. For instance, I'm not going to stop using Opera because most repositories don't have it. On top of that, various distro's have "static repositories" that only receive bug fixes during the current release cycle.

    This is where Arch is nice - the PKGBUILD system is excellent and having a rolling release means you're always up to date.
    Important Links: Community Guidelines : Use the reputation system if you've been helped.
    M-F Blog :: Write for the blog
    Writing a Quality Post

  9. #24
    What would you run on your Mac if OS X suddenly became unavailable?
    AliOop's Avatar
    Member Since
    Sep 03, 2009
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    132
    Specs:
    MacBook Pro.
    Quote Originally Posted by vansmith View Post
    How so? Package repositories don't have everything and I'm not going to wait for someone to add it. For instance, I'm not going to stop using Opera because most repositories don't have it. On top of that, various distro's have "static repositories" that only receive bug fixes during the current release cycle.

    This is where Arch is nice - the PKGBUILD system is excellent and having a rolling release means you're always up to date.
    True, distro repositories don't have everything. Or in some cases the latest and greatest of package XYX. But is it necessary to have the latest and greatest? Come folks, XP has been around for 10 years and will probably be with us another 5.

    Linux folks, at least a lot of them, feel the burning desire to constantly upgrade . Some don't. I got out of that cycle a long time ago. I'm one of those that feel v1.0 works just as well as v2.0. And if my repo does not have v2.0, oh well. So be it. At the very least, if I use a non-repo package it's designed for my package manager - an RPM package or debian package. But tarballs? No thanks. I can do without them. Even Slackware, one of the geekest distro that ever was, recommend using tarballs designed specifically for their particular distro. Also there are unofficial but approved third party repos one can use to install other programs.

    So, if you can't get a package from your distro repo, stick to a package designed for your Linux OS package manager. You'll have a lot less hassles. Belive me. I've been there.

    Concerning 'rolling' distros like Arch and others, I've been on the bleeding edge. It's not fun. Well, it was back then. Of course I was younger and had more hair. But I spent more time fixing things than using my OS. That's another thing I've left behind. I want my OS to work. Don't want to spend my time fixing, tweaking or repairing it.

    (Linux user since '97 and still using it)

  10. #25
    What would you run on your Mac if OS X suddenly became unavailable?
    CaldwellYSR's Avatar
    Member Since
    May 09, 2011
    Location
    Sewanee, TN
    Posts
    98
    Specs:
    MacBook 13" 2.4 Intel Core 2 Duo 2 GB
    I'd probably sell my MacBook and switch to my desktop full time which is currently running Fedora Linux



  11. #26
    What would you run on your Mac if OS X suddenly became unavailable?

    Member Since
    Jun 04, 2007
    Location
    Long Beach, CA.
    Posts
    314
    Specs:
    iMac 21" 2.4G 320G HD OS Snow Leopard. Win7 on Dell PC Inspiron i5 8g Ram 1TB HD
    Cool
    I'd run Linux

  12. #27
    What would you run on your Mac if OS X suddenly became unavailable?
    nezing's Avatar
    Member Since
    Nov 20, 2011
    Location
    Solihull,UK
    Posts
    28
    Specs:
    Macbook Air 11.6,Macbook 13,ipad 1,ipod Classic,iphone 4S
    "apt-get install Linux"

    then I would ask Siri "dude,what happened to my Mac OS?"

  13. #28
    What would you run on your Mac if OS X suddenly became unavailable?
    TilkiliKiz's Avatar
    Member Since
    Dec 13, 2011
    Location
    Maryland-US
    Posts
    30
    Specs:
    Processor:2.7GHz Intel Core, 4GB 1333 MHz, Mac OS X Lion, 27 in. display
    Linux for me as well, though I'd have to learn it from scratch. Definitly not Windows because as I understand, Windows for Mac is generally not supported.

  14. #29
    What would you run on your Mac if OS X suddenly became unavailable?
    Ctrl-Opt-Del's Avatar
    Member Since
    Sep 14, 2011
    Location
    Romford, Essex, England, GB
    Posts
    313
    Specs:
    iPad Air, WiFi & 4G, 16GB
    Quote Originally Posted by TilkiliKiz View Post
    as I understand, Windows for Mac is generally not supported.
    Oh, quite the opposite... Boot Camp makes it just as easy to install Windows on a Mac as any other computer.

    Indeed, one of the things that holds Windows back vs. OS X is that Windows needs generic drivers for all the hardware out there while OS X only need kexts for the specific hardware that you find in no more than 20-30 current variations of models of Mac. While Boot Camp can't do anything about the flakiness of Windows's NT kernel vs. the UNIX kernel of OS X, it does have an "Assistant" app that you run within Windows (it's an exe file) that installs all the OS X kexts ported to Windows as drivers; greatly improving its performance, even vs. high-end generic PC hardware.

    A Mac running Windows (+ Boot Camp Utilities) is probably the best PC you'll ever see!
    For my purposes as an engineering undergraduate; Windows is respectable (& generally necessary), Linux is admirable (& often useful), OS X is enjoyable (& requires no further justification, although plenty could be given)!

  15. #30
    What would you run on your Mac if OS X suddenly became unavailable?
    fluhartz's Avatar
    Member Since
    May 14, 2008
    Location
    Bexley, Ohio
    Posts
    84
    Specs:
    15" MBP 2011, i7, 8gigs RAM, OS 10.10,2 iPhone 5s, ATV3
    ubuntu and windows 7

    and not be happy about it....

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