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  1. #1


    Member Since
    Jul 25, 2004
    Location
    Gaithersburg, MD
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    389
    Specs:
    Mac Pro 2.6ghz Quad Xeon, 23" Cinema
    can't SU or login as root
    Ok, I can't get into root access using SU or login. Do I have to do something special to setup the root account? When I setup my computer it asked me for the admin password and I entered it, which always works fine for apps that require the admin password. I'm not sure how much more specific I can get other than that I can't SU.

  2. #2


    Member Since
    Jul 25, 2004
    Location
    Gaithersburg, MD
    Posts
    389
    Specs:
    Mac Pro 2.6ghz Quad Xeon, 23" Cinema
    nevermind, I found a writeup on it. I didn't know I had to use the netinfo manager to enable root.

  3. #3

    rman's Avatar
    Member Since
    Dec 24, 2002
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
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    12,584
    Specs:
    2 x 3.0GHz Quad-Core, 6GB OS X 10.6.8 | 15in MacBook Pro 2.2GHz OS X 10.6.8 | 64GB iPad 2 WiFi
    Cool
    As a safety precaution root is not enabled. A regular user would not know about it or need it. As you learn more about the system and Unix, you may want to enable it. In the hand of a new user to the system, you can destroy everthing.
    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass, It's about learning to dance in the rain!

  4. #4

    witeshark's Avatar
    Member Since
    Mar 09, 2004
    Location
    Miami FL
    Posts
    2,860
    Specs:
    G4 1Ghz OS X 10.4.7
    Also SU in Linux is SUDO in OS X. And I'm sure you know to be careful, but it does prompt you for admin password

  5. #5

    rman's Avatar
    Member Since
    Dec 24, 2002
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
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    12,584
    Specs:
    2 x 3.0GHz Quad-Core, 6GB OS X 10.6.8 | 15in MacBook Pro 2.2GHz OS X 10.6.8 | 64GB iPad 2 WiFi
    Cool
    su and sudo are two different commands. su is switch user, some people call it super user. When you use su, you are that user until you log out. An example of su is:

    su - rman -- I am logging in as the user rman.
    su -- I am logging as the root user.

    The sudo command is user to give a user limited root access, usually either for 5 minutes or the use of one command. Depending on how it is configured.

    An example of sudo is:

    sudo /etc/daily
    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass, It's about learning to dance in the rain!

  6. #6


    Member Since
    Jul 25, 2004
    Location
    Gaithersburg, MD
    Posts
    389
    Specs:
    Mac Pro 2.6ghz Quad Xeon, 23" Cinema
    I've used Linux for a few years here and there. The concept of a *nix environment isn't new to me, just the way apple has implemented it.

  7. #7

    witeshark's Avatar
    Member Since
    Mar 09, 2004
    Location
    Miami FL
    Posts
    2,860
    Specs:
    G4 1Ghz OS X 10.4.7
    rman: thanks for adding the correct details!

  8. #8
    dr_springfield
    Guest
    if you're staying in the terminal, just use "sudo -s", which is effectively very similar to "su root", and works out of the box, without any netinfo tomfoolery.

  9. #9


    Member Since
    Aug 06, 2004
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    19
    Specs:
    Mac Pro 2008 8 core -HDD Raid 0 -20Gb/Ram -ATI5870
    hi all,

    I am searching info about the relationship between Unix (BSD) and OS X; I mean I d'like to know how deep is unix implemented in the OS X.
    Using OS X just as I do under Linux it's quite difficult to me ( clicking here and there and I don't know what happening in the background).

  10. #10

    witeshark's Avatar
    Member Since
    Mar 09, 2004
    Location
    Miami FL
    Posts
    2,860
    Specs:
    G4 1Ghz OS X 10.4.7
    OS X is based on FreeBSD, and a derivation of Nextstep OS. On this is built the awesome GUI Aqua. The result speaks for itself!

  11. #11
    MoltenLava
    Guest
    sudo is not new. sudo has been around with BSD for ten years or more.

    sudo is preferrable to the root account for several reasons. In order to use root account, its password has to be known. If ten users on the system wants to be root, those ten people have to know the root password. It can easily get out of hand and get compromised.

    sudo, on the other hand, is completely based on each user. You don't need to know anybody else's password. You use your password to gain root access. It's easy to give and take away root access to the users.

    On a personal computer like Mac, it may not matter that much whether to use root account or sudo. sudo is still more convenient because you don't need to know extra password.

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