Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1


    Member Since
    Mar 11, 2018
    Posts
    9
    How to do something like "Treesize" on Windows, but on a MacBook
    I have an excellent utility to quickly show where my space is going on my Windows computer, "Tree Size Professional". Is there any way to replicate this using the software that comes with a Mac?

    If not, what are the better programs to do this?

  2. #2

    Raz0rEdge's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jul 17, 2009
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    10,558
    Specs:
    27" i7 iMac, 15" Macbook Pro TB, 13" Macbook Air, iPhone 6S, iPod Nano 7th Gen
    DaisyDisk (paid) - https://daisydiskapp.com/
    Disk Inventory X (free) - http://www.derlien.com/
    GrandPerspective (free) - http://grandperspectiv.sourceforge.net/
    DiskWave (free) - https://diskwave.barthe.ph/
    OmniDiskSweeper (free) - https://www.omnigroup.com/more/
    --
    Regards
    ...Ashwin


  3. #3


    Member Since
    Mar 11, 2018
    Posts
    9
    Do all of those produce the "pie chart" that helps you find out where the majority of the space is being used? Forgetting "free" vs. paid, is one of them superior to the others?

  4. #4

    pm-r's Avatar
    Member Since
    Oct 16, 2010
    Location
    Brentwood Bay, BC, Canada
    Posts
    8,700
    Quote Originally Posted by mikemyers View Post
    Do all of those produce the "pie chart" that helps you find out where the majority of the space is being used? Forgetting "free" vs. paid, is one of them superior to the others?

    Have a look here or at the developers sites to see what they look like, or do, or read some of the user comments and it's easy to check the others using the "Similar Software… Open Comparison" option:
    https://www.macupdate.com/app/mac/14...sk-inventory-x




    - Patrick
    ======

  5. #5

    Raz0rEdge's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jul 17, 2009
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    10,558
    Specs:
    27" i7 iMac, 15" Macbook Pro TB, 13" Macbook Air, iPhone 6S, iPod Nano 7th Gen
    They all do what you want, how they represent the info is irrelevant. I've used DaisyDisk, GrandPerspective and Disk Inventory X and they are all fine for the occasional need. I doubt this is something you'd be using all the time, so stick with the free versions (the added bonus is that you can install ALL of them and see which one you like best).
    --
    Regards
    ...Ashwin


  6. #6


    Member Since
    Mar 11, 2018
    Posts
    9
    Absolutely, "occasional use". I used software like this ages ago, which made life so much easier for me than using "du". The "pie chart" made it so simple to find the most effective place to free up space. My MacBook Pro has 512 gigs, with 50 gigs free space. I'm pretty sure photographs occupy a huge part of that (for use with Lightroom), and ditto for video (which now will be with Final Cut Pro). What is probably a smart thing to do, is to move both to an external drive.

    Whether it's free or purchased doesn't matter to me. How quickly I can free up space is what counts most, and "Tree Size Professional" on Windows was the best utility I could find, for what I want to do. I will follow your advice suggested up above.

  7. #7

    chscag's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jan 23, 2008
    Location
    Keller, Texas
    Posts
    55,611
    Specs:
    2017 27" iMac, 10.5" iPad Pro, iPhone 6s+, iPhone 7+, Numerous iPods, High Sierra
    You might want to give "Daisy Disk" a good look if you like the Pie Chart display. It's probably the closest "Tree App" to the one that you remember from your Windows days. I use Daisy Disk quite often.

  8. #8


    Member Since
    Mar 11, 2018
    Posts
    9
    Strange, what I thought was free, costs $ from the App Store.

    Downloaded Grand Perspective - I think once I figure it out, it may be useful, but...

    Downloaded Daisy Disk - perfect. Provides exactly the kind of information I was hoping to get, and in less than two minutes, it solved my current problem - what I can off-load from my 512 GB SS drive. I guess now I can move a 150 GB folder I rarely use.

    To avoid having multiple external drives with me when I travel, can I share my Time Machine drive with large folders such as this? I assume everything will be fine, but the Time Machine drive will store fewer "versions".

  9. #9

    ferrarr's Avatar
    Member Since
    May 21, 2012
    Location
    Pawtucket, RI, USA
    Posts
    4,295
    Specs:
    L2014 Mac mini macOS 10.13, iPhone 8+ iOS 11, iPad Pro 1 12.9" iOS 11,  Pencil 1
    Quote Originally Posted by mikemyers View Post
    To avoid having multiple external drives with me when I travel, can I share my Time Machine drive with large folders such as this? I assume everything will be fine, but the Time Machine drive will store fewer "versions".
    Yes, you can do that, but remember, have a backup of that folder somewhere else. Any drive can and will fail, and recovering your data will be important if there is no backup. You can't have Time Machine back up that individual file, since it will be on your excluded Time Machine drive.
    -- Bob --
    Please backup. Everything has a life cycle, unexpected and warning free. Nothing will last as long as you want it to.

  10. #10

    pm-r's Avatar
    Member Since
    Oct 16, 2010
    Location
    Brentwood Bay, BC, Canada
    Posts
    8,700
    To avoid having multiple external drives with me when I travel, can I share my Time Machine drive with large folders such as this? I assume everything will be fine, but the Time Machine drive will store fewer "versions".

    You may want to seriously consider using CCC (or SD! ) for such backups:
    https://bombich.com
    and
    https://www.shirt-pocket.com/SuperDu...scription.html

    No, not free, but much easier to use and control and they don't use any TM type aliasing etc.




    - Patrick
    ======

  11. #11


    Member Since
    Mar 11, 2018
    Posts
    9
    Won't this accomplish the same thing?

    (How do I attach a pdf file to this message, so the formatting doesn't get lost....??)

    How to create a bootable installer for macOS
    You can use an external drive or secondary partition as a startup disk from which to install the Mac operating system.
    A bootable installer can be useful when you want to install macOS on multiple computers without downloading the installer each time. When your Mac starts up from a bootable installer, it starts up directly to the macOS installer, and doesn't require an Internet connection to complete the installation.
    Download macOS from the App Store
    1. DownloadmacOSfromtheAppStore.Todownload,useaMactha tiscompatiblewiththeversionof macOS you're downloading.
    If you're downloading macOS High Sierra, use a Mac with High Sierra, Sierra 10.12.5 or later, or El Capitan 10.11.6. Enterprise administrators: Please download from Apple, not a locally hosted software-update server.
    2. WhenthemacOSinstalleropens,quititwithoutcontinuing installation.
    3. FindtheinstallerinyourApplicationsfolderasasingle” Install”file,suchasInstallmacOSHighSierra.
    Use the 'createinstallmedia' command in Terminal
    1. Afterdownloadingtheinstaller,connectyourMactotheUS Bflashdriveorothervolumethatwillbe used as the bootable installer. Make sure that it has at least 12GB of available storage.
    2. OpenTerminal,whichisintheUtilitiesfolderofyourAppl icationsfolder.
    3. TypeorpasteoneofthefollowingcommandsinTerminal.The seassumethattheinstallerisstillinyour Applications folder, and the name of your volume is MyVolume. If it's named differently,
    replace MyVolume accordingly.
    High Sierra:
    Sierra:
    edia --volum
    -volume /Vol

    These advanced steps are primarily for system administrators and others who are familiar with the command line. It isn't necessary to create a bootable installer to install macOS.
    sudo /Applications/Install\ macOS\ High\ Sierra.app/Contents/Resources/createinstallm
    sudo /Applications/Install\ macOS\ Sierra.app/Contents/Resources/createinstallmedia -
    El Capitan:
    dia --volume
    sudo /Applications/Install\ OS\ X\ El\ Capitan.app/Contents/Resources/createinstallme

    e
    u
    Yosemite:
    sudo /Applications/Install\ OS\ X\ Yosemite.app/Contents/Resources/createinstallmedia
    --volume /V
    Mavericks:
    4. PressReturnaftertypingthecommand.
    5. Whenprompted,typeyouradministratorpasswordandpress Returnagain.Terminaldoesn'tshowany characters as you type your password.
    6. When prompted, type Y to confirm that you want to erase the volume, then press Return. Terminal shows the progress as the bootable installer is created.
    7. QuitTerminalwhendone.Thebootableinstallerisnowread ytouseonacompatibleMac.Learnhowto choose it as your startup disk.
    Use the bootable installer
    1. Connectthevolumecontainingthebootableinstallertoac ompatibleMac.
    2. UseStartupDiskpreferencesorStartupManagertoselectt hatvolumeasthestartupdisk.Learn
    about selecting a startup disk, including what to do if your Mac doesn't start up from it.
    3. YourMacthenstartsupdirectlytothemacOSinstaller.Fol lowtheonscreeninstructionstoinstall
    macOS.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. "Office 2011 for Mac" vs. "Parallels 8 w/Windows 7"
    By jtdavis in forum Apple Desktops
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 12-11-2013, 10:16 PM
  2. Subfolders, Files Not Showing Up in "Open" and "Place" Windows
    By ghritz in forum macOS - Operating System
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-04-2013, 05:18 PM
  3. Running the latest "snow leopard" under "windows xp/VMWARE"
    By phil128 in forum macOS - Operating System
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-03-2009, 08:20 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •