Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: MacPorts and Homebrew. Which is better?

  1. #1

    knightjp's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jun 22, 2007
    Posts
    336
    MacPorts and Homebrew. Which is better?
    I currently have MacPorts installed on my Mac. I will admit that I'm not like the usual user that installs many different ports. I just install one or two.
    However reading up on it; I understand that there are many who prefer Homebrew even though MacPorts is sponsored by Apple.

    I am wonder which of the two better integrates the software / ports into the standard MacOS.
    From most that I'm reading, I believe that its Homebrew. But on the other hand, Homebrew does not have as many packages as MacPorts does. And from what I hear, it is not advisable for you to have both installed on one system.
    Once You've had Mac, you can't go back.... So very true.
    If necessity is the mother of invention, she obviously never met Steve Jobs..
    Julz - The Panther

  2. #2

    Raz0rEdge's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jul 17, 2009
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    10,634
    I've been using HomeBrew and have found every package that I could want through it without any issues. Back in the day when I first started with Macs, I think I tried MacPorts but not to the extend I do now and HomeBrew seems to work fine..

    If you are happy with MacPorts and have access to the apps you need, I wouldn't think there'd be a reason for you to switch..
    --
    Regards
    ...Ashwin


  3. #3

    knightjp's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jun 22, 2007
    Posts
    336
    Which of the two better integrates with the standard MacOS?
    Once You've had Mac, you can't go back.... So very true.
    If necessity is the mother of invention, she obviously never met Steve Jobs..
    Julz - The Panther

  4. #4

    Raz0rEdge's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jul 17, 2009
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    10,634
    Both or them "integrate" fine into macOS since they are primarily purveyors of command line utilities. I use it, for example, to install NodeJS, Python 3.x, Django and related applications on my system for work/projects. None of these have a UI component to them and are used entirely on the Terminal.

    Brew builds the necessary components for the Mac and installs them in a place that doesn't mess up any existing packages provided by macOS (like Python or Ruby)..
    --
    Regards
    ...Ashwin


  5. #5

    knightjp's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jun 22, 2007
    Posts
    336
    I know this is an old thread. Just thought that I would add in the information that I have collected over the past couple of months. Perhaps it could be useful for someone later on.

    Homebrew seems to be the more popular one at the moment. With many of the packages being relatively up-to-date. The default place that it installs packages on a user based location and can be done without using a "sudo" password. This pretty much is a huge negative among diehard Unix fans. Homebrew also uses more dependencies that comes standard with MacOS which in essence does mean that it is more integrated with the OS - or so users say. The downside is that many dependencies could be outdated ones as Apples seems to use outdated BSD stuff. But say that Apple decides not to include something in the next version or upgrade, your brew software installation will break or need to reinstalled as well.

    Macports fans will say that it was the one that was for a long time supported by Apple and probably still is. It sounds good if it is true and has some official Apple support. The ports and packages on Macports is larger in number, however it says that it it is not as up-to-date on Homebrew. Apparently Macports take a couple of days to update the package to the latest version.
    When installing a package, you have to use a "sudo" password and it installs the software in a central location. This wins favor with many Unix people. Another thing is that Macports does not depend on any of the libraries and dependencies that comes with MacOS itself. This means that it will download and install its own. The downside is that this means that you have two different versions of certain libraries and dependencies; taking up more space on your drive. The upside is that Macports packages are not affected by software updates from Apple and do not rely on any of the outdated stuff that Apple uses.

    The question on which one is better is still unanswered. Both have very valid advantages and disadvantages. Homebrew is the more popular one right now and its package number is increasing, but Macports seems to be the safer one when it comes to installations and updates. Many developers choose to have both installed. If you can't find what you need on one, you use the other.
    Once You've had Mac, you can't go back.... So very true.
    If necessity is the mother of invention, she obviously never met Steve Jobs..
    Julz - The Panther

  6. #6

    chscag's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jan 23, 2008
    Location
    Keller, Texas
    Posts
    55,791
    Thanks for the update and information. We appreciate your efforts on this.

  7. #7

    knightjp's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jun 22, 2007
    Posts
    336
    In terms of package managers for MacOS, there are about 8, but most users only know about 3 - Fink, Macports & Homebrew.
    According to this link https://www.slant.co/topics/511/~bes...ckage-managers, while Homebrew is the more popular one, MacPorts gets only the #5 slot.. which makes you wonder about the ones that beat it...
    Looking through the list, I wasn't completely impressed with "Nix", "Homebrew-Cask" but "pkgsrc" did catch my eye. I recall reading about it when reading up on BSDs back in the day and I believe that it was the default package manager for NetBSD. I was surprised to see it listed and rank above MacPorts, but can't figure out why it wasn't more commonly used. Being directly linked with one of the BSDs, you would think that it would be first choice.

    Pkgsrc operates much in the same way as Macports and has around 17000+ packages.. One of the benefits, unlike any of the other well-known packages, you do not need to install Xcode or Xcode command line tools to get it up and running.
    Since I could not decide on MacPorts vs Homebrew, I'm trying out pkgsrc for the moment and I like it thus far.. Its blazing fast in installing packages.
    Once You've had Mac, you can't go back.... So very true.
    If necessity is the mother of invention, she obviously never met Steve Jobs..
    Julz - The Panther

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Mac Ports vs Homebrew
    By knightjp in forum macOS - Apps and Games
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-27-2017, 01:42 PM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-05-2016, 02:42 PM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-21-2016, 09:37 PM
  4. Homebrew Warnings
    By zacharyharris69 in forum macOS - Operating System
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-25-2014, 01:12 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •