New To Mac-Forums?

Welcome to our community! Join the discussion today by registering your FREE account. If you have any problems with the registration process, please contact us!

Get your questions answered by community gurus Advice and insight from world-class Apple enthusiasts Exclusive access to members-only contests, giveaways and deals

Join today!

 
Start a Discussion
 

Mac-Forums Brief

Subscribe to Mac-Forums Brief to receive special offers from Mac-Forums partners and sponsors

Join the conversation RSS
Web Design and Hosting Creating sites, scripting, and hosting discussions.

Setting up home web server using OS X Server 10.6


Post Reply New Thread Subscribe

 
Thread Tools
angusfretwell

 
Member Since: Nov 02, 2009
Posts: 2
angusfretwell is on a distinguished road

angusfretwell is offline
I'm currently trying to set up a home web server using OS X Server 10.6, but I have no experience with things like this, so I'm a bit stuck. I've bought the OS X Server software, and a Static domain from my ISP (which I read I'd need).

Next I need to register a domain name, but I'm not sure how to make this work with OS X Server. I'd also like to be able to use the server to host e-mail accounts (e.g. me@mydomain.com) and need to know how to do this.

So... how do I need to install and set up OS X Server to work as a web server (like that of a hosting company), with e-mail support? Please help if you can, as this is really frustrating me

Thanks in advance,
Angus Fretwell.
QUOTE Thanks
xstep

 
xstep's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jun 25, 2005
Location: On the road
Posts: 3,231
xstep is a name known to allxstep is a name known to allxstep is a name known to allxstep is a name known to allxstep is a name known to allxstep is a name known to allxstep is a name known to all
Mac Specs: 2011 MBP, i7, 16GB RAM, MBP 2.16Ghz Core Duo, 2GB ram, Dual 867Mhz MDD, 1.75GB ram, ATI 9800 Pro vid

xstep is offline
You have opened a can of worms for your self.

First, most ISPs state in their agreements that they do not allow you to run services such as web servers and mail servers. They tend to block port numbers important to such services. There may be some tricks around this, but they are hassles at best.

Buying a domain is easy. Check out Godaddy, EasyDNS, or the other million registers out there. Setting up the DNS entry to find your fixed IP address is pretty easy and those sites should have instructions. Mail may have some extra issues and you have to be careful with it so that the bad guys don't use it as a forwarding service.

You should probably start by reading "Mac OSX Server v10.6 Getting Started". Searching Apple's site came up with several other documents of interest.

CameraTime - Time lapse photography for novice and advanced users.

When asking questions, post the version of your software. You'll receive better answers.

Please post your results to the thread as it is good feedback.
QUOTE Thanks
JimmyK

 
Member Since: Nov 07, 2009
Posts: 1
JimmyK is on a distinguished road

JimmyK is offline
Your going to need a couple of things.

1. You need to assign the Static IP they gave you to your computer.

2. You need to go to a site like dyndns.com and register the ip address.

3. You need to add the websites to your server and make the changes at the domain register.

4. You need to make sure that your UPLOAD speed for the home internet connection can handle multiple people using the server. Your download speed is WAY different then your upload speed for home internet service.

5. Lastly, you need to go to Lynda.com and sign up. They have the best tutorial on Leopard Server. Watch that and you will know OSX Server like the back of your hand.

Good Luck!
QUOTE Thanks
FasterPussyCat

 
FasterPussyCat's Avatar
 
Member Since: Nov 07, 2009
Posts: 164
FasterPussyCat has a spectacular aura about
Mac Specs: MacBook 10.6.2 (2.4 Ghz) | Time Capsule 500GB

FasterPussyCat is offline
Angus,

I admire your ambition to cut out everyone else and do it yourself. It is rather easy once you get the hang of it. But with no experience working with a server. I'd say slow down. First read up, that getting started guide is a perfect 101 course. There are people who work with networks for a living and would still need help with this. I would see if there might be a respectable company that offers network solutions in your area, it may not really cost that much since you are just setting this up out of your home. Someone to talk to in the flesh makes a big difference. Just a suggestion though, that may not work best for you.
QUOTE Thanks
Rafter

 
Rafter's Avatar
 
Member Since: Nov 25, 2009
Location: Toronto
Posts: 7
Rafter is on a distinguished road
Mac Specs: Mac Mini, MacBook Pro 13"

Rafter is offline
Angus,

Read the guide first and foremost. If you plan to host the site at home on your server, and its a basic site such as straight html or php, and have a decent high speed connection you shouldnt have any issues.

So register the site.

I have used easydns for a couple of reasons:

1. They offer ddns (many providers do nowadays), so you dont need a static public IP as your isp will most likely have you on DHCP. (your ISP should be able to sell you a static IP though)
2. With the right DNS service, they offer a mail relay server, which will essentially accept all incoming mail on port 25 and relay it to you on another port such as 2525. Your mail server will than send outbound on port 2525 to the relay server, which will than forward it on port 25.
3 If your ISP blocks port 80, they can redirect port 80 to another port your server is listening on.

So I would think you need Apache 2.2, PHP 5.x if you'r doing any php pages, and mysql if your site has a database backend, and a mail server such as sendmail or postfix. I prefer postfix

Hope this helps. Let me know if you need any assistance.
Trust me it is easier than it sounds.
QUOTE Thanks
dwright

 
Member Since: Dec 10, 2009
Location: Canton, Ohio
Posts: 17
dwright is on a distinguished road
Mac Specs: Various Mac Minis, Mac Mini Servers

dwright is offline
The biggest issue I have seen when hosting on a broadband connect is e-mail reliablity. Large e-mail carriers keep a database of IP addresses which are assigned to residential customers.

One thing which can help...

- Be sure to have your ISP assign a reverse DNS entry matching your e-mail domain. E-Mail servers do a reverse lookup on each message and if the name is generic the message gets flagged.

Don't be discouraged! Running a server at home is a great way to learn the ropes. There is really no better way to learn.

I manage thousands of websites across hundreds of servers. PM if you need help!
QUOTE Thanks

Post Reply New Thread Subscribe


« iweb 2006 | How to register your website with Google? »
Thread Tools

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Creating a web server m.watson Web Design and Hosting 10 09-17-2009 04:06 PM
HELP I'm trying to clean out old web site files from server bluerose Web Design and Hosting 8 02-16-2005 09:42 PM
Need help setting up a ftp server rosx Web Design and Hosting 6 01-24-2005 06:16 AM
eMac as a Server? lokerd Other Hardware and Peripherals 11 09-13-2004 10:53 PM

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:04 AM.

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
X

Welcome to Mac-Forums.com

Create your username to jump into the discussion!

New members like you have made this community the ultimate source for your Mac since 2003!


(4 digit year)

Already a member?