New To Mac-Forums?

Welcome to our community! Join the discussion today by registering your FREE account. If you have any problems with the registration process, please contact us!

Get your questions answered by community gurus Advice and insight from world-class Apple enthusiasts Exclusive access to members-only contests, giveaways and deals

Join today!

 
Start a Discussion
 

Mac-Forums Brief

Subscribe to Mac-Forums Brief to receive special offers from Mac-Forums partners and sponsors

Join the conversation RSS
Switcher Hangout The place for switchers to discuss their new machines, and how to work with OS X. General support can be had here for newbie stuff, like "How do I restart my new iMac?" :)

The Administrator doesn't have enough privilage?


Post Reply New Thread Subscribe

 
Thread Tools
Bluewolf
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

I have an eMac which is my family's home computer I twisted their arms to get. However as the administrator I cannot access their account without actually logging in as them. However I often find that I leave my account logged on and I find that they save a lot of their documents on my profile.

In attempting to transfer them to their account I found that I was unable to do so. Any reason why? :confused:
QUOTE Thanks
rman

 
rman's Avatar
 
Member Since: Dec 24, 2002
Location: Los Angeles, California
Posts: 12,591
rman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud of
Mac Specs: 2 x 3.0GHz Quad-Core, 6GB OS X 10.6.8 | 15in MacBook Pro 2.2GHz OS X 10.6.8 | 64GB iPad 2 WiFi

rman is offline
The problem is that you don't have the permisson to write in their folders.

The easiest way to resolve this problem, is to move the files to a shared area. Then let them pick up their files from there.

Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass, It's about learning to dance in the rain!
QUOTE Thanks
h0tk4rl
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

I'm guessing that if you did it from the terminal you could "sudo bash" for root access and then move anything you want.
QUOTE Thanks
Bluewolf
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Quote:
Originally Posted by h0tk4rl
I'm guessing that if you did it from the terminal you could "sudo bash" for root access and then move anything you want.
On behalf of all the switchers... huh?
QUOTE Thanks
Bluewolf
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Quote:
Originally Posted by rman
The problem is that you don't have the permisson to write in their folders.

The easiest way to resolve this problem, is to move the files to a shared area. Then let them pick up their files from there.
Thanks
QUOTE Thanks
Icarus
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

I don't understand why as an Admin, I can't access everybody's stuff.
QUOTE Thanks
h0tk4rl
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluewolf
On behalf of all the switchers... huh?
I'm a recent switcher too.
This just happens to be where OSX shows its true Linux colors.

In Applications > Utilities, find Terminal

Once you get a terminal window you need to gain root access. Typically you would use SU and enter root's password but I have yet to figure out WTF that is! LOL by typing "sudo bash" you are gaining root access by using your own password. Normally root would have to give a user this kind of access but I guess that's taken care of for you. At that point you could move files "mv" or copy files "cp"

just be damn careful!

for help, type "man" and then the command name. ie. "man sudo"
QUOTE Thanks
beret9987

 
Member Since: Apr 21, 2004
Location: San Francisco, California
Posts: 173
beret9987 is on a distinguished road
Mac Specs: 15" 2.2Ghz SR MBP

beret9987 is offline
Its acutally Unix not linux.
QUOTE Thanks
h0tk4rl
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Quote:
Originally Posted by beret9987
Its acutally Unix not linux.
TOE-MA-TOE, TOE-MAH-TOE

I was actually waiting for someone to call that out but I was too lazy to edit it. Anyway, if you know enough that there's a difference then sudo should be a snap for ya.
QUOTE Thanks
Icarus
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

and for those of us who don't have any clue what you just said, is there a real easy way to get into those other folders?
QUOTE Thanks
h0tk4rl
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Quote:
Originally Posted by Icarus
and for those of us who don't have any clue what you just said, is there a real easy way to get into those other folders?
I am assuming yes but I have no idea how to do it any other way yet.
QUOTE Thanks
rman

 
rman's Avatar
 
Member Since: Dec 24, 2002
Location: Los Angeles, California
Posts: 12,591
rman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud of
Mac Specs: 2 x 3.0GHz Quad-Core, 6GB OS X 10.6.8 | 15in MacBook Pro 2.2GHz OS X 10.6.8 | 64GB iPad 2 WiFi

rman is offline
There are three type of user accounts. The root user, admin user and the regular user. The admin user and the regular user are basically the same, except the admin account has a little more privilege.

Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass, It's about learning to dance in the rain!
QUOTE Thanks
hype.it

 
hype.it's Avatar
 
Member Since: Mar 27, 2004
Location: China
Posts: 738
hype.it is on a distinguished road
Mac Specs: Dual 2.2GHz powered by AMD Opteron - *Sends G5 & 8Gb Ram to scrap heap* Yeah! finally switched BACK!

hype.it is offline
Mac OSX isn't like windows, where the other user accounts are only hidden from view and logging in as System Admin can control everything including deleting personal documents. On the Mac the read, write and execute permission can be changed but often not, so other users have no access what so ever. :p

The whole idea of a secure multi user system is it's security. Other user's are not permitted to access other peoples home folders even if your the Admin, you still can't access their HOME folder.

You could try logout and try logging in as ROOT, but you'll need the Root password before you can login plus the Root User must be enabled in the Admin Account. Otherwise you just have to dump their files in the USERS > SHARED folder or the USERS > your username > PUBLIC


No other choice.

Like i share my PowerBook with my Girl Friend. To date, i have no idea what's on this HD, everything in her HOME folder has been encrypted. I just hate to think... what if I need to reinstall..... I realize now, what i should of done is change the permission in her home account so i could view, thus making a backup. But i didn't and I'm locked out forever!
QUOTE Thanks
Bluewolf
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Quote:
Originally Posted by hype.it
The whole idea of a secure multi user system is it's security. Other user's are not permitted to access other peoples home folders even if your the Admin, you still can't access their HOME folder.

You could try logout and try logging in as ROOT, but you'll need the Root password before you can login plus the Root User must be enabled in the Admin Account. Otherwise you just have to dump their files in the USERS > SHARED folder or the USERS > your username > PUBLIC


No other choice.
That does make sense as I remember I had to force my family to get a password. I was impressed that before you could use OSX you needed a password as standard.

I think leaving things in the 'public' folder will do.

As for the whole ROOT, Terminal access thing I will leave that well alone. I don't think many switchers whom have never used anything else other than windows should really have that kind of advice as the last thing a switcher wants to do is test out that Apple Care Plan, but thanks for the advice anyway.
QUOTE Thanks
MoltenLava
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Ok, here's the deal.

Admin users are exactly the same as normal users, except for one thing. They are "sudoers". i.e. You can execute sudo and then become root, or the "super user". Non admin users can't sudo and become root.

Without issueing sudo, admin users will have the same privilege as regular users. They won't be able to read files that they don't have permissions for.

Be VERY careful when you do sudo. There is a reason why admin users don't have super user power all the time. It's very dangerous. One typo and you can kiss your system good bye. "sudo bash" is especially a very bad advice. Don't do sudo bash unless you know exactly what you are doing.

What you want to do in this case is use the shared folder. You can use /users/shared or you can create another folder and give it 777 permission. (chmod 777 <folder name>).
QUOTE Thanks

Post Reply New Thread Subscribe


« How do I tell if... | Anyone Know... »
Thread Tools

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off
Forum Jump

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:12 AM.

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
X

Welcome to Mac-Forums.com

Create your username to jump into the discussion!

New members like you have made this community the ultimate source for your Mac since 2003!


(4 digit year)

Already a member?