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  1. #16

    MacInWin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by McBie View Post
    Hmmm.... Not sure I would link ID theft to the backup question .
    Backing up your ID is not helping you to recover from ID theft.
    So the protection of your ID is proactive and the backup of data is reactive.
    In the end it is all about semantics I guess, but it is always a good thing to think about what you want to achieve and not immediately jump into the ' technology ' area.

    Cheers ... McBie
    ID Theft is not really linked to backup, but it can be used to help you decide how much to spend on backup strategies. I brought it up more in response to your comment from an earlier post:

    But a monetary value for my private information .... I would not have a clue?
    Considering the value of ID theft COULD give you some ROM estimate of the value of your private information. And with that, I turn the thread back over to the original purpose...

  2. #17


    Member Since
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    Another option that I don't belief has been mentioned yet is using an online backup service like BackBlaze, Carbonite, or CrashPlan (to name a few). I personally use BackBlaze in addition to a Time Machine backup. I use TM as my primary means of restoring systems and files if need be. BackBlaze is there in case of a fire, theft, or some catastrophic event that would make it impossible to access my Mac or the TM backup.

    Personally, any good backup plan must have some sort of off-site aspect to it. You just never know when disaster will strike.

  3. #18

    toMACsh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobtomay View Post
    I don't follow that reasoning - at all - and I use both external hard drives and flash drives.

    Cost of flash drives are approximately $10 for every 16 GB - two 64 GB or a single 128 GB flash drive is going to run about $70. For that same $70 you can get a USB 3 - 1,000 GB external hard drive. At $120, you can find a 3,000 GB external drive.
    Let's see if I can clarify a bit. Your analysis is strictly a cost per GB one. I conceded, I thought, in my original post that an external drive would win over a flash drive if that was the only metric applied. However, you can buy a flash drive smaller in capacity that any external hard drive for less money than the smallest capacity external. So, if your criteria is that you really don't need even a 300GB external, and a 16GB flash drive will do AND cost is the overriding determinant, the choice is obvious.

  4. #19


    Member Since
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    Ah yes, that makes much more sense ...

    ... unless you factor in the "oops I left the flash drive in my pants and now they've gone through the washer" variable, or the "I swear I laid it down right here" variable, neither of which apply to larger external HDs.

  5. #20

    toMACsh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chas_m View Post
    Ah yes, that makes much more sense ...
    More sense than.... not reading the second sentence in my original post?

  6. #21


    Member Since
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    what is difference between time machine saving and the cloud vs hard drive t1 backup?

  7. #22

    BudVitoff's Avatar
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    Late 2009 iMac 21.5; 3.06 GHz Intel Core Duo; 4 GB 1067 MHz DDR3, dual-boot, El Capitan, and Win 7.
    You should definitely look at CrashPlan.com. They have been given extremely high ratings all over the place. You have complete and simple control over what does (not) get backed up, and they offer four methods, three of which are free. Their most powerful method stores your data in the cloud, and costs slightly less than Carbonite.

    The free methods store your data on (1) another computer of yours, (2) a folder, presumably on an external drive, or (3) on a friend's computer. I happen to be providing backup on my system for a friend, using about 50GB on my hard drive.

    When you visit their site, you will notice an inordinate occurrence of the number "42". This is due to the fact that somebody over there is fond of the book "A Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy".

  8. #23

    Slydude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by witnwisdom7 View Post
    what is difference between time machine saving and the cloud vs hard drive t1 backup?
    Cloud based backups are essentially an off site backup. Let suppose you are backing up data using Time Machine and an external drive or Time Capsule in your house. In the event of a disaster (fire, theft, etc), both the original data and backup could be lost because they are in the same location. Online/cloud based backups are less prone to this since they are stored in a different physical location.

    There are some things you should keep in mind about online/cloud-based backups:

    1. If you have to replace all your data from an aniline backup this could put a serious dent in any usage caps your ISP has in place.
    2. The speed of your download connection is going to affect how long it takes to download files you need.
    3. Your upload speed is going to affect how long it takes to complete a backup. A full backup may take quite some time. Many of the online services have a program which runs in the background while you perform other tasks but any net activity you're doing slows the backup.
    4. Not all online services properly back up Mac system files. Don't expect, for example, to re-install the base OS then restore the system to its latest release. If your cloud backup service does not handle system files this won't work.
    "Got Time to breathe. You got time for music." Denver Pyle as Briscoe Darling

  9. #24


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    I use time machine and two drives. I keep one drive at work, and one in a dock next to the computer.

    I swap the drives at least every two weeks, sometimes one week. This way I can maintain an offsite backup.

    For me, USB3 is fast enough for doing a backup.
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  10. #25

    Slydude's Avatar
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    That's not a bad approach. I think I've even read instances of users who keep a drive in their safe deposit box. Depending upon the type of account involved some banks offer the boxes either at no charge or for a small fee.
    "Got Time to breathe. You got time for music." Denver Pyle as Briscoe Darling

  11. #26


    Member Since
    Mar 12, 2014
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    I personally recommend Super Duper, having only ever used that and not used CCC, I can say however that it has always been flawless and efficient. The difference between the free trial version and the paid for one is not speed per se as has been alluded to earlier, but rather it is that the free version does not allow 'smart updates' which means that after the initial clone, subsequent clones only update anything that has changed, so it is faster to complete for that reason alone, which by the way can make updating the clone with smart update a hundred times faster depending on how big the drive is and how much has changed.

    I used to have an external dock that took internal 3.5" drives which I bought originally for my iMac but I'm phasing that out now because it's not a good idea due to bulk and speed. The Seagate caviar 3.5" drives connected to my macbook via USB 3 write at about 55mb/sec, a separate self contained USB 2 Seagate writes about about 39mb/sec, but my current suggested option is something like a portable 2TB MyPassport Ultra II which writes at over 90mb/sec and does not need a wall wart.

    I back up my macbook to a 512 partition on the 2TB portable drive and use the rest for my music collection, also have a separate Media Library plus a clone of that.

  12. #27

    Iatros55's Avatar
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    I am using a WD external HDD (2 TB for Time Machine, but then got a good deal on a 4 TB Seagate external HDD. I was able to enable both for use in Time Machine, as well as back up my documents and photos on the Seagate. I also use Mozy online backup for all my docs and photos. I don't trust thumb drives (how do you know which is which?) or SD cards. Besides, my data bases are too large. My iMac is perfectly happy with these drives now, and I feel better about having this much backup.

  13. #28

    McBie's Avatar
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    Something to keep in mind when considering Cloud based backup ( any vendor ) is the real-life definition of a cloud.

    A cloud = Using the Internet to store my data on your hard discs in an unknown country.

    There is no legal framework around a cloud and no service level agreements, meaning that when you need your data stored in the cloud, it may or may not be available/reachable.
    Secondly, you have no control over who can see/use your data in the cloud.

    As long as you keep the above in mind and accept it, then you're good to go.

    Cheers ... McBie
    Last edited by McBie; 03-29-2014 at 01:21 PM.
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  14. #29

    vansmith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by McBie View Post
    There is no legal framework around a cloud and no service level agreements, meaning that when you need your data stored in the cloud, it may or may not be available/reachable.
    Secondly, you have no control over who can see/use your data in the cloud.
    This is very important if privacy is a concern. At the end of the day, internet based services are built around someone else managing and keeping your data. Your information could be halfway around the world on a server run by a company that could do anything (within some legal limits which may not be legal limits that you're comfortable with).
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  15. #30


    Member Since
    Jun 21, 2009
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    Off site storage
    A few years ago, our house burned down. All of our photos and slides were lost. All of our digital copies were on the computers we had with us. We changed our behavior to this:
    1. Every physical photo, important document, or receipt has a digital copy.
    2. All digital copies are backed up using Time Machine. Plenty of comments on how to do that above.
    3. We have a portable USB drive that we backup all computers in the house to, using Carbon Copy Cloner (but I'm thinking of using Time Machine for that as well). This backup occurs every Thursday.
    4. The external backup drive comes with us when we leave the house.

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