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-   -   Is there a way to disable the incessant password requirement? (http://www.mac-forums.com/forums/switcher-hangout/296406-there-way-disable-incessant-password-requirement.html)

dotdotdot 03-12-2013 01:49 PM

Is there a way to disable the incessant password requirement?
 
Every move I make seems to trigger the pop-up with a request for my Apple password.
It's annoying, just like Vista demanded a password. Change something in Preferences...password, please. When I download an update, (eg, Flash), again with the password. Update to my A/V...password.

I know it's for my own protection against something detrimental, but this boarders on the absurd. However, why would a legitimate app such as Flash, etc., trigger a red flag?

This was a big criticism with Vista, but is Apple getting a free pass here? Maybe I'm getting old...

pigoo3 03-12-2013 01:53 PM

Go to:

- Apple Menu
- System Preferences
- Security & Privacy
- "General" tab

Also check your "Sharing" preferences.

Check your settings here. It may help with some things.:)

- Nick

MacInWin 03-12-2013 01:58 PM

Get rid of whatever A/V you downloaded. Don't need it. As for PWs, OSX asks for your PW whenever you are changing an application. And with the new Sandboxing function, it asks for it for any software trying to install from an unknown (to Apple) source, i.e., third-party websites. If you want to disable the sandbox protections, System Preferences, Security and Privacy, change the selection where it says "Allow applications downloaded from:" to whatever you want. "Anywhere" is the most open, but also most risky, as OSX gets out of the way of any install, including malware.

Flash is a resource hog. I don't have it installed, nor do I have Java. Both have security holes you can drive a truck through.

dotdotdot 03-12-2013 02:18 PM

OK, that helped a bit, or I should say time will tell. Thank you. I clicked the "download app from anywhere" option without a password.

Anti virus (Avast) is here to stay. I know "it's not needed" but I hate surfing naked and don't buy for one minute that Macs are bullet proof in any aspect.

MacInWin 03-12-2013 02:27 PM

You don't like "surfing naked" so you install pretty-much useless A/V software but you disable the OSX security feature that would prevent any malware from installing without your permission?

I went the other way. No A/V until I hear about a real virus for Macs (there have been zero of these to date), but I keep my security pretty tight. I just loosened it up to allow the identified developers. I don't mind typing in my password to verify that I really do want to install something. I did kill Java and Flash, too many holes in them for my comfort level.

dotdotdot 03-12-2013 02:35 PM

I'm after an easy Mac "experience", not to jump though hoops.

By the way, the only time I've been asked for a password I knew 100% of the time it was for, and from, a legitimate source, hence my rant about passwords.

MacInWin 03-12-2013 02:37 PM

Yep, I only have to enter the PW when I install something I know about, too. But I also have the confidence that nothing is installed that I don't know about. With that protection turned off, you won't be able to say that.

EDIT: But that is your call. Just different approaches, that's all.

chas_m 03-12-2013 09:02 PM

That password requirement (which ONLY comes up when you are a) installing new software or b) making changes to the system, so you really shouldn't be seeing it much at all) is THE REASON Macs don't have viruses.

You've opted to go with a resource-sucking piece of crapware and turning off all security on your Mac because you're too lazy to *occasionally* put in your admin password?

I think I'm beginning to understand why viruses are so rampant on the PC platform ...

dotdotdot 03-12-2013 09:32 PM

Well now.

Like I said, every single time I've been prompted to enter my password it was for a recognizable action. So, by disabling the password requirement I am getting rid of the annoyance, risk free.

Anti virus. It can suck all the resources it wants as I have an abundance of RAM (8G) and free disc space (475 GB). Is the A/V necessary? I don't care as it costs me nothing monetarily or in resources so I don't see why not, just in case.

MacInWin 03-12-2013 09:54 PM

The A/V does cost resources. I takes cycles of the CPU and your time while it's doing its thing.

Here's the analogy. OSX provides protection to keep a burglar out of your house. It stops people that are suspicious, giving you the chance to decide to let them in, while permitting access to your known friends. You have disabled that protection, but hired a guard to shoot that burglar once he's in the house. That burglar needs to be fed, and he frisks every visitor, friendly or not, delaying arrival of friends.

Why not let OSX do what it does and not add unneeded delays?

Raz0rEdge 03-12-2013 10:04 PM

Bottom line, your computer, you can do as you wish. Getting rid of the password requirement is a risk that you seem to be willing to take, and hoping that the A/V will catch potential threats is a gamble. While there aren't any virus' for OS X, giving ANY application free reign to install itself can definitely lead to all sorts of issues...

But, good luck with that..

Poolman 03-12-2013 10:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MacInWin (Post 1502066)
The A/V does cost resources. I takes cycles of the CPU and your time while it's doing its thing.

Here's the analogy. OSX provides protection to keep a burglar out of your house. It stops people that are suspicious, giving you the chance to decide to let them in, while permitting access to your known friends. You have disabled that protection, but hired a guard to shoot that burglar once he's in the house. That burglar needs to be fed, and he frisks every visitor, friendly or not, delaying arrival of friends.

Why not let OSX do what it does and not add unneeded delays?

I love this analogy :D

Thor-HoG 03-13-2013 01:33 AM

Disable password requirement
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MacInWin (Post 1501978)
If you want to disable the sandbox protections, System Preferences, Security and Privacy, change the selection where it says "Allow applications downloaded from:" to whatever you want. "Anywhere" is the most open, but also most risky, as OSX gets out of the way of any install, including malware.

Hi MacInWin - I'm compelled to reply as this isn't exactly correct. This method does not turn off sandbox protection at all. During install, OSX examines the code-signing certifcate used to sign the app. Apple has their own for Apple developed apps. Other apps on the AppStore have a "non-Apple-but-official-App-Store" certificate. This is how you can tell OSX to install only Apple, or only Apple and App Store, or "anywhere." "Anywhere apps" have no restrictions on code signing certificates. While Apple requires all apps on the App Store to code specifically to the Sandboxing feature, that has nothing to do with "turning it off." You CAN'T turn it off. Even with "Anywhere" selected, every single App Store apps, and many Apple apps, will run in a Sandbox. Now, it's my experience that non-App-Store 3rd party apps have chosen not to use sandboxing, but again, that has nothing to do with disabling Sandbox. For instance, FireFox is not sandboxed. If you asked me, that's crap as any browser should be required to run in a sandbox, but oh well.. Safari doesn't either :/

FWIW, you can look at what apps are or are not sandboxed by adding the "sandbox" column to Activity monitor. Or not. It's depressing. On my box "root" only has a few out of 55 Sandboxed. Anyway, thought I would throw that out there.
t

chas_m 03-13-2013 05:35 AM

Sandboxing is, as you say, a basic level of protection -- both from unstable apps causing system crashes and from malware trying to extend its reach. But sandboxing shouldn't be mistaken from the kind of protection setting it to "only allow installs of apps from the Mac App Store or signed Apple developers" does.

Updates will quickly change the number of apps you have that honor the sandboxing thing over the next [couple of] year or so. Developers don't really have much choice in the matter. Most people will leave the security settings on their default or the middle choice.

PS. I don't know what version of Safari you're using, but yes it is sandboxed. The *application* will read "no," but Safari Web Content (the WebKit engine) will read "yes."

dotdotdot 03-13-2013 07:05 AM

I guess it's all a moot point as I got the pop-up prompt for my password for the anti-virus "data base update." I did check to make sure the box was still ticked for "anywhere" in Preferences > Security, and it was.

My iMac is protecting myself from myself!:Evil:


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