Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1


    Member Since
    Apr 04, 2011
    Posts
    16
    Considering a Mac Book Pro
    (I hope this is the right forum)
    Hello,

    I am considering getting a Mac Book Pro 15 inch for college. I will be a Computer Science major and I'm wondering if there's any advantage of using Mac OS X for programming over Windows 7 (Windows will on on the mac regardless). Any thoughts?

  2. #2

    cwa107's Avatar
    Member Since
    Dec 20, 2006
    Location
    Lake Mary, Florida
    Posts
    26,887
    Specs:
    15" MBP, Core i7/2GHz, 8GB RAM, 480GB Crucial M500 SSD
    No advantage that I can think of. It's really just a matter of personal preference as to which one you want to use. With that said, if you're thinking of going into business developing, the Mac App Store is as much a boon for independent Mac developers as the App Store is for iOS developers.
    Liquid and computers don't mix. It might seem simple, but we see an incredible amount of people post here about spills. Keep drinks and other liquids away from your expensive electronics!

    https://youtu.be/KHZ8ek-6ccc

  3. #3


    Member Since
    Apr 04, 2011
    Posts
    16
    Thank you.

    I'm still interested in a Mac for the build quality though. I might be back to this forum in a year though.

  4. #4


    Member Since
    Apr 04, 2011
    Posts
    1
    Programming on a Mac
    Quote Originally Posted by anifan View Post
    (I hope this is the right forum)
    Hello,

    I am considering getting a Mac Book Pro 15 inch for college. I will be a Computer Science major and I'm wondering if there's any advantage of using Mac OS X for programming over Windows 7 (Windows will on on the mac regardless). Any thoughts?
    I can't speak for Windows 7, but if you'll be installing it anyway (via Parallels or Bootcamp, or some such), then you'll have the best of both worlds.

    Macs ship with PHP, tcl, Perl, Python, and Ruby. If you need a database, Macs ship with MySQL and SQLite. If you want to do web development, Macs ship with Apache2. I repeat: Macs ship with all that preinstalled.

    Using XCode (which costs $4.99), you can write C, C++, and Objective C. All the major SCM software programs run on Mac, including SVN, Mercurial, and Git, and there are great GUI software front-ends (I use Tower for Git and Versions for SVN).

    Need something more esoteric? Erlang is used in a lot of college CS classes. To install Erlang, first install the Homebrew package manager (package managers are common in the *nix/Linux world; don't know if there's something similar on Windows).

    Once Homebrew is installed, installing Erlang is as simple as typing
    Code:
    brew install erlang
    at a command line. Homebrew takes care of downloading and compiling Erlang for the specific OS version and architecture you're running.

    (a list of packages available through Homebrew is here: https://github.com/mxcl/homebrew/tre...brary/Formula/)

    Most anything that runs on Unix or a unix-like environment will compile on a Mac.
    That, combined with the ability to run Windows at the same time, makes a Mac a great programming tool.

  5. #5


    Member Since
    Jan 22, 2010
    Location
    Victoria, BC
    Posts
    20,911
    Specs:
    Mid-2012 MBP (16GB, 1TB HD), Monoprice 24-inch second monitor, iPhone 5s 32GB, iPad Air 2 64GB
    I was going to say it depends on what you're going to be primarily programming in.

    Macs can (literally) handle any language. They are especially good for what I shall call "programming for the future" (ie iOS apps, web programming and the better languages around these days). They are not so great if your focus is on Windows apps and while you could certainly do it, not the best bang for your buck in that regard.

  6. #6


    Member Since
    Apr 03, 2011
    Posts
    33
    Only thing I can say is XCode is nice but for a Variety of languages and Utilities for Programming them you might need windows.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Mac book pro vs Mac book air
    By Kittyf in forum Apple Desktops
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-07-2011, 08:44 PM
  2. New Mac Book Pro Slower boot than Old Mac Book Pro
    By ChalexJeep in forum Apple Notebooks
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 10-25-2010, 09:00 PM
  3. Mac Book unibody or Mac Book Pro (early 2008)?
    By miu in forum Apple Notebooks
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 12-06-2008, 12:26 PM
  4. Help with Verizon Aircards for Power Book G4 & Mac Book Pro
    By brucie1dog in forum Apple Notebooks
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-20-2008, 12:59 AM
  5. Mac Book Mac Book Pro Differences?
    By poomaster in forum Apple Notebooks
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-23-2008, 11:42 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •