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  1. #1


    Member Since
    Mar 23, 2011
    Posts
    2
    EEEK!!! splitting the hard drive and using Windows Software
    Hi

    I have been a PC user for years and thought what the heck the macbook pro is supposed to be great so got me one (13"/4GB/320GB) and it looks nice.

    Here's the thing.....

    I have been running a piece of recruitment software on my PC (laptop) called Palustris and it does not work in a mac environemnt and they say it is unsupported on a mac machine as they have not tested it (fair enough).

    I've been told by a pal to use bootcamp to section the hard drive and create a windows enviroment in 2/3 of it. Upload a windows 7 OS and the office suite for 2007. Then set it to boot up in windows.

    The Palustris software links to Outlook and Word and needs these to work:

    WINDOWS EMULATOR
    SQL SERVER EXPRESS 2005
    WINDOWS INDEXING SERVICE
    .NET FRAMEWORK 3.5

    I have no idea what these are (or desire to know as I am a TechnoDummy) but does anyone know if this will work? I dont want to pay the set up/transer of data fees for the Palustris database if its a pointless exercise.

    Also, given that I am going to be using it in windows mainly as I need this to work do you think there is any benefit to keeping the macbook as I can take it back as am yet to install or do anything (was looking at a Sony Viao too).

    Any advice greatly appreciated
    Lisa Techno Dummy

  2. #2

    MikeM's Avatar
    Member Since
    Oct 06, 2007
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    201
    Specs:
    13" MBP - Mid 2012 - i7 / iPad Air / iPhone 5s / ATV3
    Bootcamp isn't a windows emulator, it's a full installation of windows that is compatable with all regular Windows software. It's like having two computers in one. You need a full retail copy of Microsoft Windows since your Mac does not come with one. Run the Bootcamp tool from your utilities folder in applications and it's pretty simple from there.

    Again, all your windows software will work in the windows installation setup through bootcamp.

    -MikeM

  3. #3

    chscag's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jan 23, 2008
    Location
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    Late 2013 27" iMac, iPad 3, iPhone 6s+, iPhone 6+, 3 iPods, El Capitan
    Welcome to the Mac Forums.

    Also, given that I am going to be using it in windows mainly as I need this to work do you think there is any benefit to keeping the macbook as I can take it back as am yet to install or do anything (was looking at a Sony Viao too).
    If this is true, it's my opinion you may be better off returning your MBP and instead buying a nice PC notebook. You can of course run Windows on your new MBP but you would either have to use virtual software (Parallels, VMWare Fusion) or create a separate partition using the Boot Camp assistant and install Windows.

    Either way requires a full install copy of Windows (XP, Vista, Win7) and means running two operating systems on your machine. If the majority of your work is in Windows, it's better to have a PC.

    It's your decision of course.

  4. #4

    vansmith's Avatar
    Member Since
    Oct 19, 2008
    Location
    Toronto
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    19,782
    Specs:
    2012 13" MBP (2.5 i5, 8GB)
    Quote Originally Posted by chscag View Post
    If the majority of your work is in Windows, it's better to have a PC.
    I agree with chscag here. If you depend heavily on Windows software and will be spending most of your time with Windows, there is little point in purchasing a Mac.

    You also imply that you purchased it on a whim. I'd suggest that unless you have a reason for buying a Mac, you're better off sticking with what you're comfortable with (in this case, a Windows machine).
    Important Links: Community Guidelines : Use the reputation system if you've been helped.
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  5. #5


    Member Since
    Mar 23, 2011
    Posts
    2
    Thanks for the replies.

    I got the mac because it looks nice and the speck is good but am also sold on that I can take it into my apple store and they will fix it. The last laptop was not very well supported - I bought Techguys and when it broke they wanted to take it away for ages and then send it back which is no good as this is a business machine.

    I think and hope that the software will work - it seems from the replies that it will be a windows OS so should be an easy install (60 per hour tho).

    Cheers
    Lisa

  6. #6


    Member Since
    Jan 22, 2010
    Location
    Victoria, BC
    Posts
    20,911
    Specs:
    Mid-2012 MBP (16GB, 1TB HD), Monoprice 24-inch second monitor, iPhone 5s 32GB, iPad Air 2 64GB
    I know several people who use their Mac notebooks as "Windows machines" from 9-5, and Macs on their own time.

    I think the suggestion of making 2/3rds of the drive for the Windows partition is nutty -- no more than half at maximum -- but otherwise Bootcamp sounds like a good solution for you, and as a bonus you get a "free" Mac to enjoy on your own time.

  7. #7


    Member Since
    Sep 14, 2009
    Posts
    64
    It's well worth trying out virtualbox (free) before using Bootcamp (I chose to set aside 40Gb for my WinXP install.... it's all taken care of during the Virtual Box install)
    VirtualBox


    You'll need your Windows disk of course, but the Vbox will allow you to run both systems at same time. Works well for me and runs a Company XP program fine - you can install Windows Office as well if you like, but the new Mac Office 2011 seems pretty good , so maybe just need Outlook in your Windows virtualbox...

    Give it a try as it's free and fairly easy to setup (the paid virtual machine systems like Parallels or VMware might be a touch easier...).

    Bootcamp will work just fine... but means shutting down to get from one OS to the other, whereas the Parallels or VBox will allow you to switch windows just as if you're switching from one Mac App to another using Expose etc....

    Coops

  8. #8

    cowbrain's Avatar
    Member Since
    Apr 05, 2009
    Location
    London UK
    Posts
    142
    Specs:
    MBP 2.9GHz i7, 16GB DDR, 512GB, , MB black 2.4GHz core two duo, 4GB RAM, 500gb hdd (7200 rpm) 10.6.8
    I've been running Bootcamp for two years now (Same reason, I use a program which needs Windows) and I've had no problems with it.
    Bootcamp on my Macbook gives me the best of both worlds - allows me to explore a new system (Mac OS X) and retains the familiar platform for my editing program.

    Whilst I agree with the above posters (if Windows is 99% of your work), then take your MBP back and buy a PC machine, I just wanted to point out that Bootcamp does offer a good alternative.

    Agree with chas_m, 2/3 is a very large partition, unless your program requires it.

    I also keep my Windows partition completely offline, so have no need for any anti-virus/malware etc.

    Good luck.
    MBP 2.9GHz i7, 16GB DDR(Crucial), 512GB SSD (Crucial M550) OSX 10.9.5
    Macbook black, 2.4GHz core2duo, 4GB ram, 500GB HDD(7200rpm), OS X 10.6.8
    iPhone 4S

  9. #9

    MacInWin's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jul 07, 2008
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    Winchester, VA
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    5,634
    Specs:
    2015 rMBP, 2008 iMac, iPhone 6, iPad mini, 13" MBP, AppleTV and two MacMinis
    Another option is Parallels or VMWare. I use the latter, so when I boot WindowsXP, it comes up in a window under OSX. It can attach to my printer, USB devices, DVD drive, etc, or I can block it from those. I can change that on the fly, so if I don't need the DVD drive on Windows, I just leave it on OSX. The beauty is that that I can move between Windows and OSX pretty seamlessly. Files I can move by drag/drop onto the desktop of each other. I also run with no AV software because I have a clean image saved that if I get infected I can just whack the infected image and boot from the clean image without having to reinstall everything. I do have to re-save a clean image every once in a while to make sure I have the latest files, but that's a few seconds work.

  10. #10

    brianwmay's Avatar
    Member Since
    Mar 17, 2008
    Location
    Doncaster, UK
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    286
    Specs:
    MBP, iPad 2 64, 2 x iPod Touch, MBA, 2 x iPhone 3g
    I've used Parallels for the last 3 years. I'm running Windows 7 without problem, XP and Ubuntu Linux (just because I can).

    They are all working really well and when in full screen mode, you'd never know that you weren't on a PC (yes you would, it has so few problems).

    The relief is, then you can drop back onto OSX.

    This latest iteration of Parallels is outstanding and VERY robust.
    Mac Junkie
    - MacBook Pro 2.4, 500Gb, 4Gb
    - MacBook Air (wife's), - iPad 2 64Gb
    - 2 x iPod Touch 32Gb and iPhones 3GS 32Gb

  11. #11

    TomServo's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jan 15, 2011
    Location
    Southern Illinois
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    267
    Specs:
    27" iMAC 3.20GHZ INTEL CORE I3, 1TB SERIAL ATA DRIVE, ATI RADEON HD 5750 1GB GDDR5, 12GB DDR3 RAM
    As a recent switcher I too was faced with the dilemma, the vast majority of working stiffs use/need a PC so for me to run what I need to earn a living I Bootcamped my new iMac.

    After installing a neat free app called Bootchamp I can, with a single mouse click, switch between OS'. As a bonus all my games all run as great on the windows side.

    But like other's have said if your primary use is going to be with Windows you may be better off with a Win based PC. And yes my iMac cost about $500 more than a comparable PC but I'm happy I bought the iMac - no regrets.

    Good luck and happy computing.

    Tom

  12. #12

    cowbrain's Avatar
    Member Since
    Apr 05, 2009
    Location
    London UK
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    142
    Specs:
    MBP 2.9GHz i7, 16GB DDR, 512GB, , MB black 2.4GHz core two duo, 4GB RAM, 500gb hdd (7200 rpm) 10.6.8
    Quote Originally Posted by TomServo View Post

    ...edit...

    After installing a neat free app called Bootchamp I can, with a single mouse click, switch between OS'. A


    Tom
    Hey Tom, how long does this take? Is it instant?

    A drawback of Bootcamp (to me) is the (eg) 3 min deadtime while Windows boots and OS X shuts down. I can't flit between the two systems.
    MBP 2.9GHz i7, 16GB DDR(Crucial), 512GB SSD (Crucial M550) OSX 10.9.5
    Macbook black, 2.4GHz core2duo, 4GB ram, 500GB HDD(7200rpm), OS X 10.6.8
    iPhone 4S

  13. #13

    TomServo's Avatar
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    Jan 15, 2011
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    Southern Illinois
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    Specs:
    27" iMAC 3.20GHZ INTEL CORE I3, 1TB SERIAL ATA DRIVE, ATI RADEON HD 5750 1GB GDDR5, 12GB DDR3 RAM
    Quote Originally Posted by cowbrain View Post
    Hey Tom, how long does this take? Is it instant?

    A drawback of Bootcamp (to me) is the (eg) 3 min deadtime while Windows boots and OS X shuts down. I can't flit between the two systems.
    I'd say less than 30 seconds from the time you click on the Bootcamp looking ICON which is installed on the upper tool bar, select WinOS and Windows7 boots.

    But I will say that lately it's hung up forcing me to power off the iMac and when I re-power Win7 than starts.

    But to be honest the Power Off, Hold Option Key and Power On was a crap shoot too.

    Tom

  14. #14

    chscag's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jan 23, 2008
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
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    48,209
    Specs:
    Late 2013 27" iMac, iPad 3, iPhone 6s+, iPhone 6+, 3 iPods, El Capitan
    The only program which I have found effective in providing quick dual booting or triple booting to either OS X, Windows, Linux is rEFIt. However, I do not recommend it for a new user as it can be a bit complex to setup with all the various options it offers. It's open source and free.

  15. #15

    cowbrain's Avatar
    Member Since
    Apr 05, 2009
    Location
    London UK
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    Specs:
    MBP 2.9GHz i7, 16GB DDR, 512GB, , MB black 2.4GHz core two duo, 4GB RAM, 500gb hdd (7200 rpm) 10.6.8
    Quote Originally Posted by TomServo View Post
    I'd say less than 30 seconds from the time you click on the Bootcamp looking ICON which is installed on the upper tool bar, select WinOS and Windows7 boots.

    But I will say that lately it's hung up forcing me to power off the iMac and when I re-power Win7 than starts.

    But to be honest the Power Off, Hold Option Key and Power On was a crap shoot too.

    Tom
    Thanks Tom. Nice to know, but tempted to leave things as they are for now.

    I tend to boot into Windows from System Preferences/StartupDisk, rather than the Power off/Option method.

    Thanks, too, to chscag. Sounds excellent - but too advanced for me.
    MBP 2.9GHz i7, 16GB DDR(Crucial), 512GB SSD (Crucial M550) OSX 10.9.5
    Macbook black, 2.4GHz core2duo, 4GB ram, 500GB HDD(7200rpm), OS X 10.6.8
    iPhone 4S

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