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  1. #31

    Exodist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pigoo3 View Post
    If you install antivirus (which is unnecessary)...you will actually slow your computer down (anti-virus programs run in the background using system resources).

    You've been warned. Go ahead & install it and learn the hard way. Then you'll be back asking how to uninstall the antivirus app you were so keen on installing.

    - Nick
    This is why I didn't recommend AVG or Avast also.. I like them, think they run good. But I did not want any back lash from the OP about said system slowing down.

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  2. #32

    rainbowcat's Avatar
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    Not to discount what the experts here are saying, but you can try Avast, which is free. I don't run it, but heard it's good. Buying an expensive software package, like Intego or Kaspersky, isn't going to help you, and as others have said, they will slow down your Mac. You really are better off protecting yourself by increasing your security settings, being careful with your email, etc.

  3. #33

    dtravis7's Avatar
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    I just actually tried the Avira package for OSX. I was going to try it on older iMac but it wants a new OS than 10.6. So far just in letting it do it job (It's real time and runs all the time) I did not notice any CPU strain or anything. So far anyway and it's free. The Pay one does more including Malware I believe.

    For those who "JUST HAVE TO HAVE" an AV installed, give it a try. Grin

    I unistalled it unless I need it. It found NOThING on my late 2007 iMac which has been upgraded to each new OSX from 10.6 to 10,9. I use it for everything and still with all that usage, not one thing was found. I think that backs up what most here have said!

  4. #34

    pigoo3's Avatar
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    Thread moved to Security Awareness forum.

    - Nick
    - Too many "beachballs", read this: Beachballs
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    - Almost full hard drive? Some solutions. Out of Space
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  5. #35


    Member Since
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    I think it's quite humorous for people here to say that Macintosh doesn't need anti-virus software because there's either no viruses for OS X nor other unwarranted thoughts.

    Apple itself utilizes Norton anti-virus on their systems. I wonder why this is? There are, and in fact, threats of malware, rootkits, keyloggers, and so-forth that have compromised consumer Apple computers, esp. those utilizing Java with their browsers.

    And the exaggerated claims of AV software slowing down your computer? I can't say if this is true or not, but having run Trend Micro, Kaspersky, Intego, and currently using BitDefender, I've never had an issue with my MBP (late 2013, 16GB RAM, 2.3GHz quad-core) falling in performance nor have any of these AV softwares caused issues with my laptop.

    Also, believe this or not, one of my virus scanners, when performing a full system scan, picked up a few infected files from Safari. Now isn't that interesting . . .

    You can say what you want. That's your opinion. But I'll tell you this: anything that is assembled can be disassembled. That means that because man created OS X, man can certainly exploit it. It's common sense. Think for yourselves.

  6. #36

    dtravis7's Avatar
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    In fact there are billions of full true self installing self replicating virus's for OSX!!! I have 10 virus apps running at the same time just to be sure. Windows is almost Virus free though!

    My one disagreement, I have never seen a Mac from Apple that had Norton installed out of the box.

  7. #37

    pigoo3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mlyon83 View Post
    Apple itself utilizes Norton anti-virus on their systems.
    As dtravis7 mentoned...I also have not seen Norton installed on Mac's in a widespread fashion (not in about 15 years). Norton rarely even advertises towards the Macintosh community anymore.

    What "systems" are you talking about?

    Quote Originally Posted by mlyon83 View Post
    That's your opinion.
    And your post was your opinion. Thank you.

    - Nick
    - Too many "beachballs", read this: Beachballs
    - Computer seems slower than it used to? Read this for some slow computer tips: Speedup
    - Almost full hard drive? Some solutions. Out of Space
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  8. #38

    vansmith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mlyon83 View Post
    I think it's quite humorous for people here to say that Macintosh doesn't need anti-virus software because there's either no viruses for OS X nor other unwarranted thoughts.
    I don't think a single person here has suggested that OS X doesn't have vulnerabilities.

    Quote Originally Posted by mlyon83 View Post
    Apple itself utilizes Norton anti-virus on their systems. I wonder why this is? There are, and in fact, threats of malware, rootkits, keyloggers, and so-forth that have compromised consumer Apple computers, esp. those utilizing Java with their browsers.
    Do you have proof of this?

    Quote Originally Posted by mlyon83 View Post
    Also, believe this or not, one of my virus scanners, when performing a full system scan, picked up a few infected files from Safari. Now isn't that interesting . . .
    Sure that wasn't a false positive? If not, care to share what you found? I'd be interested to see how it disproves anything said here (genuinely).

    Quote Originally Posted by mlyon83 View Post
    You can say what you want. That's your opinion. But I'll tell you this: anything that is assembled can be disassembled. That means that because man created OS X, man can certainly exploit it.
    I doubt anyone would again disagree with you.

    Quote Originally Posted by mlyon83 View Post
    It's common sense.
    You can't just say "it's common sense" and assume that makes you right.

    Quote Originally Posted by mlyon83 View Post
    Think for yourselves.
    Who says we aren't? Just because we have a different set of views doesn't mean we don't think for ourselves. No one side has a monopoly on free thought.
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  9. #39

    dtravis7's Avatar
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    To Nick, Only time I have ever seen Norton installed from Apple was back in the days when Apple was dying before Jobs came back. Not sure on the years but maybe 1990's sometime. I did see Norton back then on SOME new Macs.

    That was System and OS7-9 and NOT OSX. There were a few TRUE virus's back in the Late System and OS9 days.

    If Apple installed Norton today it would be the first thing I would remove as Norton is a poorly coded hog of an application.

  10. #40

    pigoo3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dtravis7 View Post
    To Nick, Only time I have ever seen Norton installed from Apple was back in the days when Apple was dying before Jobs came back. Not sure on the years but maybe 1990's sometime. I did see Norton back then on SOME new Macs.

    That was System and OS7-9 and NOT OSX. There were a few TRUE virus's back in the Late System and OS9 days.
    This is pretty much the time period I was thinking of. Back when "Norton Utilities" was big on the Mac platform (before OS X). Back when we were defragmenting all the time!

    Norton definitely hasn't been targeting Mac-Users for a very long time. And to be honest...maybe that's because we don't need what Norton is selling!

    - Nick
    - Too many "beachballs", read this: Beachballs
    - Computer seems slower than it used to? Read this for some slow computer tips: Speedup
    - Almost full hard drive? Some solutions. Out of Space
    - Apple Battery Info. Battery

  11. #41

    harryb2448's Avatar
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    Be very, very alert when someone tell you to use 'common sense'!
    Hang on to those original install discs like grim death! Using OS X.7 or later make a bootable USB thumb drive before running Installer!

  12. #42

    Exodist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harryb2448 View Post
    Be very, very alert when someone tell you to use 'common sense'!
    Not sure why but I got a great laugh out of this, this morning.. Thanks Harry




    Back on the topic.
    It was mentioned that many of us here stated OSX didn't need AV software. And for the most part it doesn't, but the reasoning and conditions for not needing was overlooked.

    So for the sake of repetition.

    - If you only download from trusted sources (App Store, or a trusted website). If you get software other then the app store you can use MD5 SUM to validate data integrity. Most website like GIMP for example will list the DMG file and its MD5 SUM. So after downloading it you can verify the download was complete and unchanged.


    Now for those who don't know about OSX and Unix file system security and program execution/permission rights. I highly advise reading up on them. Because even if you DO download a virus to your desktop through a sneaky embedded application in a Jpeg. It WILL NOT RUN. Let me repeat myself here, I T W I L L N O T R U N.. Sorry not yelling it just trying to make that easy for everyone to read. For the said virus, trojan, etc.. To run, you must first try to execute it, thus it would have to be in a file you are wanting to open. Hence "Trusted Sources". And if for some odd reason you did set one of those application to run within your home directory you would only simple corrupt you own directory, not the rest of the operating system. So for a virus to run amok on your system it would have to be in 'local/user/bin', 'user/bin' or in OSX for example '/applications' Folders..

    So to recap, if you only download from trusted sources, don't install untrusted crap. You should be safe.

    That said, if you was running a file sharing server. Then that is the exception to the rule as not only would you want to keep files you share safe, you also don't want to spread windows virus either. So computers performing server roles should have A/V software.

    And BTW, for arguments sake here is a Ref Link on Unix Security, I highly recommend everyone read into file system permissions and why they are different on Unix, Linux and OSX compared to Windows. I think you will find why windows is so screwed up with viruses.


    Cheers,
    Joe

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  13. #43


    Member Since
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    To All Whom It May Concern:

    I sense that some defense was taken to what may have been interpreted as aggression and/or arrogance. If this applies to you, this was never the intention. However, I didn't have time to read all the replies on the thread, only a handful, but I felt the need to interject my experiences with OS X anti-virus software, primarily to contribute to the original poster's question; helping to shine some personal insight on the matter of his or her concern.

    I do thank you all for your much appreciated responses to what I'd written in my own response to the topic of discussion, and I do see you all as being brilliant with Apple systems. At least that's the vibe I get from you all. Also, when I mentioned Norton anti-virus being on Apple systems, I was referring to their employee-business Apple computers. I've had several (upon inquiring) Apple associates on live chat and through technical support make mention of this to me; therefore I find it very, very intriguing about the controversy where anti-virus for OS X is concerned.

    To answer whoever's question about what virus was detected on my MBP, I couldn't tell you. All I know is that it dealt with a couple infected cookies, if I recall correctly. Whether the detected files were false-positives or not, it gives peace of mind to know that public market anti-virus applications are actually working or running in the background idle to only have the end-user psychology feel safe. I wouldn't doubt that about some programs, and not just anti-virus protection -- where there's quick money to be made, the thieves manage to find us.

    For anyone reading this looking for an anti-virus program, I would have to recommend using BitDefender or Kaspersky. Why do I say this, you ask? Based on detection rate reports of Intego company, of course, they scored number one in detection rate, however, if my memory serves me correctly; BitDefender, Kaspersky, Trend Micro and some other AV company scored the highest in detection. And, believe it or not, while many in the Apple community seem to recommend ClamAV, it had among the worst detection rates of malicious files against a dozen other commercial AV programs. Now that I think about it, the other AV application that scored at top level was . . . Avira. . . or was it Avast? It was one of those. I'd have to find the detection report, but I don't care to look for it, and I've typed enough for tonight.

  14. #44

    dtravis7's Avatar
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    Avira is good for sure. Use it on Windows and it's great there. I have the Mac version just in case.

  15. #45

    chscag's Avatar
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    Using an anti-virus program on one's Mac is always at the discretion of the user. We only state what the general experiences have been by those of us and others who have been long time Mac users.

    Many folks that join our forums are new Mac owners and have been long time Windows users where the use of AV and anti malware software is an absolute must. Most of these new users continue with old habits that are brought over from Windows. However, it's not our direction here to discourage them from using an AV package but to educate them about the facts concerning OS X and viruses or malware.

    Also, AV software is getting better and more sophisticated for OS X and while it may not now be needed, there may come a time when it is. Let's keep that in mind.

    In the meantime, I would worry more about the NSA watching you through your camera and listening in on your iPhone conversations.

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