New To Mac-Forums?

Welcome to our community! Join the discussion today by registering your FREE account. If you have any problems with the registration process, please contact us!

Get your questions answered by community gurus • Advice and insight from world-class Apple enthusiasts • Exclusive access to members-only contests, giveaways and deals

Join today!

 
Start a Discussion
 

Mac-Forums Brief

Subscribe to Mac-Forums Brief to receive special offers from Mac-Forums partners and sponsors

Join the conversation RSS
Schweb's Lounge Forum for general conversation, chit chat, or most topics that don't fit in another forum.

Steve Jobs, The Entreprenuer?


Post Reply New Thread Subscribe

 
Thread Tools
DC_Xtreme
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Hi Everyone, I dont know if this is the best place to ask, but after reading the forums you seem to have a great deal of knowledge on steve jobs. I have to do an essay on him and I am having trouble meeting the key points that i have to highlight in his life, these are:

Times when he has used Entreprenuerial management as opposed to "general" management.

The use of theoretical management in his venture

Uncertainty and risk, and its recognition and management in the apple venture.

How Steve encourageged entreprenuership within his company (intreprenuership)

I've come up with some examples but I seem to be lacking:

Steve Jobs’ Management Thinking

Steve Jobs is different from most “General Managers” in that he takes personal responsibility for what Apple makes and how those products feel to the end user. Jobs directs the design process from start to finish, asking endless questions, expressing opinions, unfailingly pushing the comp any toward better products. The sort of decisions that at most companies are considered finishing touches like the colour of a computer case, the sound a product makes when it is opened or closed are to him the very heart of the user experience and so are at the core of the design process. It is this that sets him apart from normal managers, in fact one of the key attributes that entrepreneurs display is that they take the initiative and feel a personal responsibility of their company / product.

Steve Jobs’ Entrepreneurial Qualities

Steve Jobs attended lectures at the Hewlett-Packard electronics firm in California. There he was hired as a summer employee. Another employee at Hewlett-Packard was Stephen Wozniak (who would later become the co-founder of Apple with Jobs) who had dropped from the University of California at Berkeley. His passion was engineering; at that time he was making a "blue box," an illegal telephone attachment that would make free long-distance calls. Steve Jobs actually helped him sell a number of the devices to customers, this is interesting also because it has been said that there is sometimes a thin line between an entrepreneur and a criminal. In fact Ket de Vries (1977) theorized that entrepreneurs are “deviants” because they deviate from the norm and that many criminal elements in society are highly entrepreneurial.

After finishing high school Jobs went to Reed College but dropped out after one year, he continued to stay on campus though and dropped in on philosophy classes frequently. After a short stint working at Atari (a famous arcade games company) in 1974 he went travelling to India with a friend from college to find enlightenment, on his return he started to attend home brew computer classes which were run by his old friend Stephen Wozniak. While Wozniak was very keen on creating and learning more about computer electronics, Jobs was much more interested in the marketability of these items and talked Wozniak into helping him make a personal computer. A good entrepreneur always looks to surround himself with people who can help him make his vision a reality, even though Steve Jobs had a good idea of what he wanted to do, his interest and knowledge of electronics at the time was not sufficient to achieve that, so he enlisted the help of someone he knew had the right attributes.

The Apple II was incredibly successful (See Appendix B) but a while later IBM released their personal computer, after 2 years they were beating Apple in units sold and had a large market share, this forced Steve Jobs to have a rethink of how the Apple was put together and marketed. The problem was that the Apples operating system was not compatible with IBM’s; people were buying IBM computers because they had made an industry standard operating system which was not compatible with Apples products. He realised that he needed to make the apple compatible with IBM computers and also introduce new computers which could be marketed in the business world, which IBM currently had a grip on.

Because of Steve Jobs powerful vision he had amazing ideas that everyone thought was practically impossible. He had great vision for different kinds of computers, for example he wanted the computer case to look good and not just a box, something that wasn’t a characteristic of normal computers.

Steve Jobs & Risk Taking

The “Apple I” prototype was designed in Jobs’ bedroom and put it together in his garage, Jobs went on to show the machine to various electronic retailers locally and one ordered 25, he gathered advice from an ex CEO of Intel as to how to market the product. To start their company they had to sell their most valuable possessions, Jobs sold his VW Micro Bus and Wozniak sold his HP Scientific Calculator which raised $1,300 as capital, to add to this they went to local retailers with their idea and basically begged for credit to set up their first production line, Wozniak was encouraged to quit his job at HP by Jobs which he did, he then became the vice president, in charge of research and development of Jobs’ new company, Apple.

They both took risks by selling off their most prized possessions to start this company, but they were calculated risks as an order had already been placed for 25 of the computers from a local store, so this identifies Jobs as a calculated risk taker, something that he displayed though out the years.

When Steve Jobs returned to Apple after they bought neXT as interim CEO, he immediately halted the Mac Clone market, signed an alliance with Microsoft, one of its fiercest competitors and cancelled the “Rhapsody” operating system before it could be released. He risks criticism and failure by making gutsy decisions to take his companies in the direction he wants.

Steve Jobs’ Encouragement of Intrepreneurship

The Apple II had some basic additions to the Apple I, but mostly stayed the same; the main thing was the addition of a hook up so that colour VGA monitors could be connected, something rarely seen on computers at that time. Steve Jobs encouraged budding coders to create their own programs for the Apple II, this resulted in the Apple II having a software library of over 16,000 applications, this not only made the Apple II more desirable because of the huge software library, but also gave coders the chance to showcase their talents and get noticed themselves.

It has been said that Steve Jobs possesses a 'reality distortion field' - by a mixture of charm and exaggeration, he can make people believe almost anything. His particular ability has been to gather together small groups of highly talented people, and inspire them to work tirelessly to do things that previously weren’t thought to be technically possible, within a ridiculously short time frame. Many of these people felt positively murderous towards him at the end of these stints, but it is testament to his powers of persuasion that all stayed the course and got the projects completed on time.

Steve jobs can inspire people in a very unique way, he can motivate them easily and can get them to do what he want them to do. He can make them believe anything is possible. Because he has this power of inspiring people, the people usually work really hard for him, most of the time working for hours and hours to meet a set target. The mac team which brought out the first GUI home computer were working amazing hours so that they can meet their targets.

It would be of great help if those of you that know Steve much better than me could throw some suggestions into the hat, I've hit a dead end, i guess what i need is Steve here to use his reality distortion field on me!

Thanks alot Guys

Jon
QUOTE Thanks
Tiranis
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

I won't be of much help, but I just wanted to suggest using Wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_jobs if you didn't do so yet. There's some nice info there and links...
QUOTE Thanks
caribiner23

 
caribiner23's Avatar
 
Member Since: Feb 06, 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,499
caribiner23 is just really nicecaribiner23 is just really nicecaribiner23 is just really nicecaribiner23 is just really nicecaribiner23 is just really nice
Mac Specs: MacBook Pro Retina 13" among far too many other Apple products

caribiner23 is offline
Read this book. It paints Steve Jobs in a somewhat negative light, but it may offer more insight.

I spent about a year and a half working with NeXT Computer engineers and support, and I sat through many, many hours of meetings with Steve and his staff. He does tend to get involved in aspects you'd never expect a CEO to get into, which is both good and bad.

The picture you painted is mostly accurate-- what were your sources?
QUOTE Thanks
rman

 
rman's Avatar
 
Member Since: Dec 24, 2002
Location: Los Angeles, California
Posts: 12,591
rman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud ofrman has much to be proud of
Mac Specs: 2 x 3.0GHz Quad-Core, 6GB OS X 10.6.8 | 15in MacBook Pro 2.2GHz OS X 10.6.8 | 64GB iPad 2 WiFi

rman is offline
Mod Note: moving thread to the proper forum.

Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass, It's about learning to dance in the rain!
QUOTE Thanks
DC_Xtreme
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Quote:
Originally Posted by caribiner23
Read this book. It paints Steve Jobs in a somewhat negative light, but it may offer more insight.

I spent about a year and a half working with NeXT Computer engineers and support, and I sat through many, many hours of meetings with Steve and his staff. He does tend to get involved in aspects you'd never expect a CEO to get into, which is both good and bad.

The picture you painted is mostly accurate-- what were your sources?
Wow, I didnt expect to hear from anyone who actually worked alongside him at one stage, thanks for the heads up on the book - I'll give it a shot, thats the book that raged Jobs abit right? and he banned it, and all books by its publishers from apple stores.

My sources are mainly from news articles, biographies online and also i found fokelore.org which has lots of good information on the original mac and how it was concieved.

I was just wondering if you had any stories yourself about Jobs as CEO maybe some examples of how he went beyond the role of a normal "general" CEO and took a greater interest, from your meetings with him? if you could that would be amazing, I'm sure it would really add to my report to have a testimony from someone who worked with and observed him.

Thanks for the help guys.
QUOTE Thanks
caribiner23

 
caribiner23's Avatar
 
Member Since: Feb 06, 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,499
caribiner23 is just really nicecaribiner23 is just really nicecaribiner23 is just really nicecaribiner23 is just really nicecaribiner23 is just really nice
Mac Specs: MacBook Pro Retina 13" among far too many other Apple products

caribiner23 is offline
Yes, iCon is the book that Jobs banned from the Apple Stores, along with every title by the book's publisher.

One story that I can relate here involves one of the original NeXTStation models. I worked for an investment firm who dropped a lot of money on the NeXT solution. We discovered that one particular model was plagued with a bad ethernet controller (not one machine-- it was the entire run of one of the models) and it caused all sorts of nasty problems on our network. Our CIO called Steve Jobs who showed up on Saturday morning with a couple engineers. Steve understood the problem but was far more interested in getting it resolved quickly because this could have given NeXT a real black eye.

In most cases that I've deal with, a typical CEO would have sent one of his management team to deal with this, but I thought it was significant that the head of the company himself would actually get involved.

Hope this helps. Good luck on your paper!
QUOTE Thanks
DC_Xtreme
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Thats great, thanks alot!

I'm having alot of trouble finding information on Steve Jobs post NeXT .. anyone have any useful links? seems odd that there is not much information on how he marketed the iPod and so on, I dont have time to get iCon - leaving things to the last minute as usual!
QUOTE Thanks
caribiner23

 
caribiner23's Avatar
 
Member Since: Feb 06, 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,499
caribiner23 is just really nicecaribiner23 is just really nicecaribiner23 is just really nicecaribiner23 is just really nicecaribiner23 is just really nice
Mac Specs: MacBook Pro Retina 13" among far too many other Apple products

caribiner23 is offline
iCon does the best job of documenting the period you're looking for.

Surely there's a Borders or Barnes & Noble near you, and you have 30 minutes to flip through the book.... :-)
QUOTE Thanks

Post Reply New Thread Subscribe


« SBC-Yahoo! DSL Service | iSync w/ Sony Ericsson V800 issue »
Thread Tools

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Happy birthday steve jobs... Macman Apple Rumors and Reports 20 03-01-2005 03:42 PM
My Steve Jobs report Zapple Switcher Hangout 1 02-27-2004 06:51 PM
'World's Most Powerful: Bill Gates v Steve Jobs' Murlyn Apple Rumors and Reports 15 12-08-2003 01:59 PM
Dress up as 'pirate' Steve Jobs this Halloween Murlyn Schweb's Lounge 3 10-29-2003 06:19 PM

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:47 AM.

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
X

Welcome to Mac-Forums.com

Create your username to jump into the discussion!

New members like you have made this community the ultimate source for your Mac since 2003!


(4 digit year)

Already a member?