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  1. #1

    Murlyn's Avatar
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    Post Penn State and Napster Offer 'Free' Music?
    Source: MacRumors.com

    Penn State and Napster Offer 'Free' Music?
    Thursday November 06, 2003 03:49 PM

    Excite.com and CNet report that Penn State University is planning to offer "free digital music listening and limited downloading" to their students..

    Rosenberger said students will be able to stream music at no cost. They will also be able to download a song and move it to a digital music player for a brief period of time for free, he said. Students who want to download the song permanently or burn it to a CD, will have to pay "small fee," he said.

    The service is said to be based on an agreement between Penn State and Napster, which offers an unlimited listening service to its customers for a fixed money fee. As noted in the quote, these songs are only available for use on the individual's computer, and may not be moved to digital players or burned to CD without additional fees. These songs also expire when service is discontinued.

    The service will begin in January and will be funded through an existing $160/semester IT fee the students already pay.

    Like many college students, however, Penn State's students already seem to be taken by iTunes' local sharing abilities:

    Andrew DiSabitino (senior-civil engineering) uses iTunes sharing through a local network.
    .....
    "I don't even know how I'd improve upon [iTunes], it's great," he said.

  2. #2
    dziner
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    I lived in State College about a year ago and I feel that te majority of students would much rather use iTunes. It'll be interesting to see how this works out.

  3. #3

    rman's Avatar
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    Cool
    That's a joke. The school should be worried about education, not music. If it is a problem with bandwidth, shut down the service. I don't see how ofeering free music will resolve any problem of their bandwidth problem.

  4. #4

    MacAddikt's Avatar
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    i agree. id raise hell if they added a fee for people to listen to music.

  5. #5
    dziner
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    Penn State has been in a crunch because of a lack of government funding or something, so tuition has been growing at a very fast rate. I wonder if they think this will help offset the costs. Maybe not. It just doesn't make sense to me.

  6. #6

    Murlyn's Avatar
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    Im not sure problem you see with it.. I don't see anything mentioned about bandwidth problems.. The students already pay an IT fee and so this is one of the ways that the college is using that money.. it is not costing the students a penny more to listen to music. It's when they want to permanently download the music to their own computer and burn it to CD etc, that's when it's going to cost them a tiny bit of dough.. less than 99 cents Im sure since it sounds like it has an expiration date. But otherwise they get to listen to all the music they want for free. I don't see a problem at all with what they are doing or any of the other issues you guys are mentioning...

  7. #7

    MacAddikt's Avatar
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    it just seems that if they can cut costs, this would be an unnecessary service worth cutting.

  8. #8

    Murlyn's Avatar
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    Here is another article from the NYTimes.com

    Penn State Will Pay to Allow Students to Download Music
    By AMY HARMON
    Published: November 7, 2003

    ennsylvania State University has agreed to cover the cost of providing its students with a legal method to download music from a catalog of half a million songs, in a departure from punitive efforts to curtail music swapping on college campuses.

    The deal between Penn State and the newly revised Napster online service is expected to serve as a model for other universities. It comes as the music industry applies pressure on students and colleges in its antipiracy campaign.

    Graham Spanier, the president of Penn State, said it was the first time a college had taken it upon itself to provide music to its students.

    "It is unusual," Dr. Spanier said. "But today's college students have told us how important this is to them and with the record industry's new enforcement efforts, we think they'll be very excited to participate."

    For some students, the deal may seem as though Prohibition has ended, and drinks are on the house.

    The service will allow students to listen to an unlimited number of songs as often as they want. They will be able to download the music to use on three personal computers as long as students are at Penn State. If they want to keep the songs permanently or burn them to a CD, though, they will have to pay 99 cents each.

    Dr. Spanier said the university will pay for the Napster service out of the $160 information technology fee students pay each year. The cost to the university is "substantially less" than the $9.95 fee that individual subscribers pay for the Napster service, he said, though he declined to disclose the precise terms.

    About 18,000 students in the university's residence halls will be the first to get the service in January, university officials said. By next fall, it is to be made available to all 83,000 undergraduate and graduate students on campuses across the state, as well as faculty and staff.

    As huge consumers of music, students have driven the file-sharing epidemic begun in 1999 by Napster, the brainchild of Shawn Fanning, then a college student himself.

    Napster went bankrupt after a federal judge ruled in 2001 it had violated copyright laws. It was relaunched last month offering individual songs for 99 cents, albums for $9.95 or monthly subscriptions for listening only, not copying for $9.95.

    Ian Rosenberger, president of the undergraduate student government at Penn State, said one student he had shown the service thought it was great. But Mr. Rosenberger added that other students were more skeptical of the university's service.

    "There's been a lot of attention paid to students as criminals," he said, "and people who download don't see themselves that way."

    In the last year the industry has sued several students suspected of illegally trading music over the Internet. Like many colleges, Penn State has used a variety of measures, from mandatory copyright tutorials to suspending Internet access, to try to clamp down. Several colleges use software programs that monitor file-swapping among students, sending e-mail messages warning them they are breaking the law as a first step in imposing penalties.

    But university and industry officials hope the Napster carrot will succeed where various sticks have failed in undermining the campus culture of unauthorized copying.

    "We have to try every mechanism to see what will be effective," said Sheldon Steinbach, general counsel of the American Council on Education, which represents colleges and universities. "I fully anticipate many institutions will follow suit, whether with Napster or other services."

    Facing demands from the music industry to remove copyrighted files from their networks, several universities began meeting with entertainment industry officials this year to consider how to provide alternatives to making unauthorized copies of music with software like Kazaa.

    Dr. Spanier of Penn State and Cary Sherman, president of the Recording Industry Association of America, led the committee. The industry blames file-sharing services for a sharp decline in sales in the past three years.

    "The impact of training the habits of future generations cannot be underestimated," Mr. Sherman said. "If people get into the habit of downloading music for free in their college years, they're likely to retain that mentality and be lost as customers."

    For Napster's parent, the software company Roxio, the deal represents a chance to capture clients it might keep after graduation. Investors were not necessarily persuaded it would see new profits soon. Shares of Roxio fell 94 cents, or 10 percent, to $8.88 in Nasdaq trading on Thursday.

    Advertisement


    Some students criticized the Napster service, which uses copy-protection software to prevent files from being copied to more than three computers or burned to a CD without paying the 99-cent fee.

    Why, asked Penn State's student newspaper, The Collegian, in an editorial last month, "must the proposed program be so limited?"

    The editorial predicted that students would still copy music without paying for it over services like Kazaa, adding that the Napster service wasn't "truly free," because student funds would be diverted from other services to pay for it.

    The new, administration-sponsored Napster may also lack the subversive appeal of peer-to-peer services like the original Napster or Kazaa, which work by allowing individuals using the software to copy music directly from each other.

    Robert Haber, chief executive of CMJ Network, which tracks music trends among college-age consumers, said he expected deals like Penn State's to shift downloading into an increasingly legal arena.

    "I don't want to say it's the death of file-sharing services," he said, "but I think it will put a significant dent in them because it's easy to use and it's really a viable alternative."

    He said he hoped deals with universities would spur the online services to include music from unsigned artists and independent labels, too.

    "They may think it's very cool," he said of students using the service, "but if it doesn't appeal to them content-wise, it's not going to work."

  9. #9

    rman's Avatar
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    Cool
    The above article proves some my point. I must be getting old. For I believe that higher education (colleges), which you must pay for. Should be in the business of promoting education, not music. To me any fund used to work a deal with Napster, is not being used to provide a better educational source. This would lead to the PC vs. Mac debate or what about sports programs.

    To make it simple when I went to college it was about getting a new education. Then again I must be old fashion.

  10. #10

    Murlyn's Avatar
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    Ahh I see what you are saying, sorry I missed it I agree and if they could focus on that then the costs wouldnt be as high as they are now, but since colleges are competing with each other they use these type of tactics to get students into their schools, and most of the time the tactics they use.. have nothing to do with education. Yeah I think I get it I believe that way also.. not sure why I didnt make the connection with your past posts though. But I do now.. and that's what matters!

  11. #11

    rman's Avatar
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    Cool
    I know when I chose a school , my requirements were simple, the department had to be the best, then came the cost of the school. I would have loved going to USC, but due to cost I ended up at Cal State University at Long Beach. I can not complain, I did get a good education. I work hard and pay for it myself.

    But I can see your point about attracting students.

  12. #12

    Murlyn's Avatar
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    Yeah I remember reading a whole article on it because it was getting to the point that it was just plain ridiculous... schools buying jacuzzis, sauna's huge entertainment systems, etc etc just to get the students to go there.. and the article was bashing that type of thought.. which i completely agreed with.. it's a hard one. That's why I only went to college for two years, because I ran out of money and even though I was working full time, I couldnt afford it.. went into some serious dept, credit card, loans etc.. and finally realized this was ridiculous and not because I didn't want to continue.. I couldnt.. and you know.. they still ask for donations.. how about donating so that I could go back!

    Prices need to come down, it's unmanageable for those of us who do pay our own way, hey it's even unmanageable to those who make quite a bit.. when you hear them complaining.. you know that the lower income families are living paycheck to paycheck and wondering if they should eat this month or not.. just so their child can go to college... very very sad.

  13. #13

    Murlyn's Avatar
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    Here's another great link about this:

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/content/6/33864.html

  14. #14

    rman's Avatar
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    Cool
    Quote Originally Posted by Murlyn
    Here's another great link about this:

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/content/6/33864.html
    That article is an interesting read

  15. #15
    Mr.Guvernment
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    this "limited time" is crap - how are they going to garuntee that someone will delete the music when the tyime is up - and even if they make some sort of system that does it automtically - it can be broken!

    so there goes that idae.


    Also, Microsoft now owns Napster and has their own service for it. so i think the above maybe out of the Idea.

    Also, just go into winamp and u can get a few thousand free streaming sites.

    Why pay for something that is already out there and free.

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