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  1. #1

    skaheadpunk's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jan 12, 2008
    Location
    Leicester, England
    Posts
    1,760
    Specs:
    MacBook, iPod Classic, 8GB 3G iPhone, Time Capsule
    Cool Linux Recommendation
    My (ex/current/it's perpetual/god knows) boyfriend has just got Ubuntu. It's all very interesting... I've never really used Linux.

    So I'm giving it a go!

    I've got KDE right now, but there are sooo many out there... and apparently I can run Linux with Fusion.

    What do you guys like most?

  2. #2


    Member Since
    Sep 18, 2007
    Location
    Guam
    Posts
    1,004
    Specs:
    Gateway2000 P5-60. 66Mhz and 128 MB RAM.
    I have tried several distro's (SuSE, Fedora 7,Ubuntu,Kubuntu,Xubuntu) My favorites are SuSE and Ubuntu. The KDE desktop interface seems too bloated and Fedora lacks alot of drivers.Xubuntu is pretty good too but a little basic for me.It's great for older computers
    The only problem with SuSE is the boot loader (YAST) is terrible. So I would install windows then it then Ubuntu so GRUB would overwrite YAST.

  3. #3


    Member Since
    May 16, 2005
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska
    Posts
    416
    Specs:
    New MACBOOK
    when I had a pc I really liked pclinuxos and xandros.

  4. #4

    PapaNoHair's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jul 18, 2006
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,180
    Actually that depends on what level of Linux you are interested in. Easy installs are Linspire, Freespire. Other good ones: pclinux, Xandros.

  5. #5

    clint1986's Avatar
    Member Since
    Mar 06, 2008
    Location
    Devon, United Kingdom
    Posts
    129
    Specs:
    17" eMac 1.42 GHz G4, Mac OS X 10.4 "Tiger"
    I used Debian as my main desktop operating system for the best part of a year and loved it. It has an excellent package manager, a great community and isn't overly technical or simple either.

  6. #6

    Dysfunction's Avatar
    Member Since
    Mar 17, 2008
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    6,881
    Specs:
    Way... way too many specs to list.
    As a desktop I'd use fedora but I know RHEL quite well.. and while I'll use it as a server, I wouldn't use it as a desktop.
    mike
    This machine kills fascists
    Got # ? phear the command line!

  7. #7

    cwa107's Avatar
    Member Since
    Dec 20, 2006
    Location
    Lake Mary, Florida
    Posts
    26,936
    Specs:
    15" MBP, Core i7/2GHz, 8GB RAM, 480GB Crucial M500 SSD
    I would recommend Ubuntu to anyone. It's easy to install, full-featured and still quite tweakable if you like to open the hood now and then. But fresh out of the box, I was amazed by how easily the latest release version (7.10) works with wireless network adapters and WPA, which has been a long-standing weakness of Linux.

    If you like the KDE interface, try Kubuntu - and yes, they all run just fine in Fusion.
    Liquid and computers don't mix. It might seem simple, but we see an incredible amount of people post here about spills. Keep drinks and other liquids away from your expensive electronics!

    https://youtu.be/KHZ8ek-6ccc

  8. #8

    TWM's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jul 31, 2007
    Posts
    309
    if i were to install linux on my new imac, where would i find the drivers for my video/audio ect??

  9. #9

    cwa107's Avatar
    Member Since
    Dec 20, 2006
    Location
    Lake Mary, Florida
    Posts
    26,936
    Specs:
    15" MBP, Core i7/2GHz, 8GB RAM, 480GB Crucial M500 SSD
    Quote Originally Posted by TWM View Post
    if i were to install linux on my new imac, where would i find the drivers for my video/audio ect??
    If you use a distro that comes on a bootable CD (like Ubuntu), you'll know ahead of time if the drivers are preloaded. If they're not, the process for procuring and installing the drivers will vary from distro to distro. In Debian-based Linux distros (like Ubuntu), you can use apt-get to download and install missing drivers, assuming they are available in the repositories you have configured. This is why it's helpful to use a distro that is both well-supported and has a good forum (again, like Ubuntu).

    Can you tell that I'm biased toward Ubuntu?
    Liquid and computers don't mix. It might seem simple, but we see an incredible amount of people post here about spills. Keep drinks and other liquids away from your expensive electronics!

    https://youtu.be/KHZ8ek-6ccc

  10. #10

    Dysfunction's Avatar
    Member Since
    Mar 17, 2008
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    6,881
    Specs:
    Way... way too many specs to list.
    pretty much every distro has an apt-get like application (yum is the fedora/RHEL/centOS version, etc) and if it doesn't you can always install apt-get
    mike
    This machine kills fascists
    Got # ? phear the command line!

  11. #11

    GroovyLinuxGuy's Avatar
    Member Since
    Apr 02, 2006
    Location
    Edmonton, Canada
    Posts
    125
    Specs:
    15" MacBook Pro, 12" iBook G4, 14" iBook G4 running Ubuntu 7.10
    My vote definitely goes to Ubuntu (or Kubuntu if you prefer KDE) for the desktop. I use it on my workstation at work (we currently run debian servers and (K)Ubuntu workstations). Apt-get/Aptitude are awesome package managers and I've found (K)Ubuntu to be very Mac like in that everything just works. After an install there is very little tweaking that I have needed to do (I do it anyway...can't run a stock kernel now can we...hehe). I used to use SuSE, but I just found that I had more issues with applications crashing (didn't seem to matter what version). Slackware however, has got to be my all time favourite...secure, stable, and a very basic package manager--not a very user friendly distro tho.

    Cheers

  12. #12

    TWM's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jul 31, 2007
    Posts
    309
    would i be able to install ubuntu using bootcamp? or does it have to be a virtualization type program like parallels? And your saying that Ubuntu would probably be the best choice for my imac?

  13. #13

    cwa107's Avatar
    Member Since
    Dec 20, 2006
    Location
    Lake Mary, Florida
    Posts
    26,936
    Specs:
    15" MBP, Core i7/2GHz, 8GB RAM, 480GB Crucial M500 SSD
    Quote Originally Posted by TWM View Post
    would i be able to install ubuntu using bootcamp?
    I would recommend running it from the CD (the disc that you download is actually a bootable "live" disc, which allows you to run the OS without having to install it) to see if you find it useful first. Then, yes, it can be installed via Boot Camp if you decide that you like it.

    or does it have to be a virtualization type program like parallels?
    Virtualization would be ideal, since it's easy to add and remove an OS without having to make major changes to the disk structure.

    And your saying that Ubuntu would probably be the best choice for my imac?
    Yep.
    Liquid and computers don't mix. It might seem simple, but we see an incredible amount of people post here about spills. Keep drinks and other liquids away from your expensive electronics!

    https://youtu.be/KHZ8ek-6ccc

  14. #14

    PerryLynch's Avatar
    Member Since
    Sep 24, 2007
    Posts
    235
    Specs:
    17" MacBook Pro 4GB
    Try the LiveCD version of Fedora Core 8 or 9. I know that Fedora has lost a little in popularity these days, but my experiences with it on OS-X+Fusion has been great. Set yourself a small overall HD size (8-10 GB or so) and then run the .iso from the Fusion boot process. It should work, right away. Then, if after an hour or a day or two of testing, you decide it works for you, there should be an icon on the desktop that allows you to burn the current live config to that 8 GB drive you created. Then, it will work every time ;-)

    Good luck
    Perry M Lynch, CISSP CISA
    Mac Newbie, Security not-so-newbie

  15. #15


    Member Since
    Apr 24, 2008
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    19
    Specs:
    2.2GHz MBP, 4GB, 320GB
    Asking which distribution of linux is the "right" one is futile That's one of the beauties, but also one of the biggest challenges with linux adoption. There's an overwhelming array of choices of "which one do I get?" It's kinda like the whole "Which version of Windows does what I want?" with the exception that with Linux distros, they all actually "do" the same things. They're just packaged up a little differently. If your particular distro is missing something, you can add it.

    Anyway -- I'm a VERY long time Linux user, starting out right before Patrick Volkerding created Slackware (yes, I've been messing with Linux THAT long).

    I've personally settled into using Ubuntu for the past couple years, because they are focused on making things easier, every step of the way. It's like a Mac somewhat -- you get it, you turn it on, and you're immediately able to get your work done. If Ubuntu doesn't have what you need already installed, the software add/remove tool is absolutely amazing -- point and click, and the work is taken care of for you. Drivers for nearly anything and everything are already there, and it identifies most of the stuff that isn't -- and installs it for you. I like that, being able to concentrate more on what I'm doing, rather than what I have to do to make it work.

    Fedora (or any of the close RedHat adherents) are another awesome distribution. I was a dedicated RedHat user, and then a Fedora user, for quite a while as well. Actually in many ways I still am -- our production servers at work are all CentOS boxes.

    As for the Gnome/KDE choice, again that's all personal. You can run both on the same system, and switch back and forth at will. Again they both do the same thing, just a bit of an appearance difference. You can run KDE apps on your Gnome desktop, and vice versa.

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