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  1. #1


    Member Since
    Aug 01, 2010
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    15
    Specs:
    MacBook Pro OSX 10.6 Snow Leopard
    64 bit kernal and extensions
    i was looking at buying an external hard drive and on the requirement's it said it wasn't compatible with 64 bit kernal. what is 32 and 64 bit kernal and what are the advantage of one or the other. thanks for the help.
    prefiero morir de pie que vivir de rodillas

  2. #2


    Member Since
    Oct 04, 2010
    Posts
    26
    From reading the specs for your MAC im not yet sure if your mbp is 32 or 64bit.
    First you have to be sure what xbit you run and second answering your question:

    "In computer architecture, 32-bit integers, memory addresses, or other data units are those that are at most 32 bits (4 octets) wide. Also, 32-bit CPU and ALU architectures are those that are based on registers, address buses, or data buses of that size. 32-bit is also a term given to a generation of computers in which 32-bit processors were the norm.

    The range of integer values that can be stored in 32 bits is 0 through 4,294,967,295 or −2,147,483,648 through 2,147,483,647 using two's complement encoding. Hence, a processor with 32-bit memory addresses can directly access 4 GB of byte-addressable memory.

    The external address and data buses are often wider than 32 bits but both of these are stored and manipulated internally in the processor as 32-bit quantities. For example, the Pentium Pro processor is a 32-bit machine, but the external address bus is 36 bits wide, and the external data bus is 64 bits wide." (Taken from wikipedia)

    "In computer architecture, 64-bit integers, memory addresses, or other data units are those that are at most 64 bits (8 octets) wide. Also, 64-bit CPU and ALU architectures are those that are based on registers, address buses, or data buses of that size. 64-bit is also a term given to a generation of computers in which 64-bit processors were the norm.

    64-bit CPUs have existed in supercomputers since the 1970s (Cray-1, 1975; CDC 6000 series, 1964, were 60-bit) and in RISC-based workstations and servers since the early 1990s. In 2003 they were introduced to the (previously 32-bit) mainstream personal computer arena, in the form of the x86-64 and 64-bit PowerPC processor architectures.

    Without further qualification, a 64-bit computer architecture generally has integer and addressing registers that are 64 bits wide, allowing direct support for 64-bit data types and addresses. However, a CPU might have external data buses or address buses with different sizes from the registers, even larger (the 32-bit Pentium had a 64-bit data bus, for instance). The term may also refer to the size of low-level data types, such as 64-bit floating-point numbers."

  3. #3


    Member Since
    Aug 01, 2010
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    15
    Specs:
    MacBook Pro OSX 10.6 Snow Leopard
    ok sounds good didnt really understand but its ok. all i know is that from checking on my computer most of it says 64 bit i was trying to get an external hard drive but it said it wasnt compatible with 64 bit
    prefiero morir de pie que vivir de rodillas

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