Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1


    Member Since
    Oct 26, 2009
    Location
    Istanbul/HongKong/Berlin/SHG
    Posts
    212
    Specs:
    MAC OS X - 10.5.8, 2,13GHZ, Intel Core 2 Duo, FF
    Download's vs Documents folder!
    Hi,


    I am trying to figure out what the differences are on a Mac.

    As I understand ALL the downloads are collected in your "Download folder", and the "Document folder" is what you create out of your download folder/files/images, is this correct?

    If that is the case, this means you might have almost all files double, right i.e. once in your download folder and at least once in your document folder!

    In that case, I wonder how do you organize your files in both folders if at all, to avoid having the same files/folders/images!

    With a Windows based system you are told that you have a file and are asked to change the file name, but with Mac this is not the case!

    Is there a way your Mac could tell you, that you have a certain file/folder/image on your system?

  2. #2

    Zoolook's Avatar
    Member Since
    Sep 24, 2006
    Location
    Brooklyn, New York
    Posts
    2,756
    Specs:
    15" MacBook Pro, i7 2.66Ghz, 8GB RAM, 512GB SSD; iPad 3, iPhone 5
    The download folder is the default folder for files downloaded from the internet, although you can change your preferences in Safari or Firefox to select a different folder or to ask you every time a file downloads.

    The download folder is not really intended for long term storage or creating a complex file structure. I regularly delete mine - I just use it for DMG downloads, downloading pics that I then import to iPhoto or delete, or PDFs/Documents that if I choose to keep I'll file somewhere permanent.

    As for the documents folder, well it's like MyDocuments in Windows... you can store files here in whatever form you like in whatever folder structure you like. And BTW, both Vista and Win7 now have a 'download' folder, it's only XP that didn't.

    If you want to search for any image or document, use Spotlight or the search box in the top right of any window. Every version of a matching file will show.
    In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is stoned to death.
    - Joan D. Vinge


  3. #3

    vansmith's Avatar
    Member Since
    Oct 19, 2008
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    19,742
    Specs:
    2012 13" MBP (2.5 i5, 8GB)
    You are free to use the folders as you see fit. As zoolook has noted, the Downloads folder is the default for files downloaded in Safari and Firefox but this can easily be changed. You are responsible for organizing files and folders as you see necessary.

    If you want more info on the filesystem structure in OS X, take a look at this.
    Important Links: Community Guidelines : Use the reputation system if you've been helped.
    M-F Blog :: Write for the blog
    Writing a Quality Post

  4. #4

    Aptmunich's Avatar
    Member Since
    Mar 09, 2004
    Location
    Munich
    Posts
    9,073
    Specs:
    Aluminium Macbook 2.4 Ghz 4GB RAM, SSD 24" Samsung Display, iPhone 4, iPad 2
    Plus since you would move files to your documents folder, they wouldn't be copied, so no duplicates.

  5. #5

    toMACsh's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jul 30, 2009
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    5,992
    Specs:
    Mac Mini (Late 2014) 2.6GHz Intel Core i5 Memory: 8GB 1600MHz DDR3
    Quote Originally Posted by fncos View Post
    With a Windows based system you are told that you have a file and are asked to change the file name, but with Mac this is not the case!
    Well, not quite.

    If you're talking about the Documents folder:
    Attempting to move or copy an item there with the same name as an existing one will produce a warning asking if you want to overwrite it.

    (Do you want a tome on the difference between moving and copying in OSX?)

    If you're talking about the Downloads folder:
    If you download something twice, the Mac assumes you have a reason for doing so, and will not overwrite the first one. Instead, (lets say it's called "file") the second one will be called "file1", the third "file2" etc. The only way to avoid this is to first (before downloading) rename "file" to "vile" or whatever.

  6. #6


    Member Since
    Oct 26, 2009
    Location
    Istanbul/HongKong/Berlin/SHG
    Posts
    212
    Specs:
    MAC OS X - 10.5.8, 2,13GHZ, Intel Core 2 Duo, FF
    Hi,


    thank s for the details and especially for the above informative link.

    I am a newbie - still trying to figure out what Mac and all its default settings are about, only than I might be able to customize it to meet my needs!

    I found out now, that if you use the "copy tab" while being on a folder/file as I did recently (I am using FF) you will get the same that you have already in your download folder, a second file/folder with the added "copy" to the file/folder name.

    Furthermore, if you are not careful after reading a file that you want to save, I said save not "copy" you might end up duplicating files/folders! Duplication, in this case happens by means of adding a number to the file name, you should click once on the save botton!

    But subsequent searching on your system about the file name, will only reveal the file with the file name only and not the duplicated one's, this I am still trying to understand why that is the case!

    Also, I am still trying to figure out how to see details while hoovering over a folder/file to get to see basic details; as you can on a windows based system i.e. creation date, exact file/folder name, size etc

  7. #7

    toMACsh's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jul 30, 2009
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    5,992
    Specs:
    Mac Mini (Late 2014) 2.6GHz Intel Core i5 Memory: 8GB 1600MHz DDR3
    Quote Originally Posted by fncos View Post
    Also, I am still trying to figure out how to see details while hoovering over a folder/file to get to see basic details; as you can on a windows based system i.e. creation date, exact file/folder name, size etc
    You can't. Mac OSX does not have that feature. To get that info, you have to highlight the file or folder, then use the appropriately named Get Info command. There are several ways to do that.

    Do Command-I (⌘-I) on the keyboard. That is, both of those keys simultaneously.
    Go to the Menu Bar, click: File > Get Info
    Hit the blue Get Info button in the Toolbar of the Finder Window (that's the window in which you see the file or folder)

    If you don't have a blue Get Info button, right click (or control-click) on the Toolbar (top) of the Finder Window and select Customize Toolbar...
    From the pop-down pane, drag the Get Info button up to the Toolbar and release the mouse. Do that for any other item you fancy from that pane.

    Hope that helps!

  8. #8


    Member Since
    Oct 26, 2009
    Location
    Istanbul/HongKong/Berlin/SHG
    Posts
    212
    Specs:
    MAC OS X - 10.5.8, 2,13GHZ, Intel Core 2 Duo, FF
    Hey,


    thanks for your inputs...

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Documents Folder
    By CarolynR in forum OS X - Operating System
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 01-18-2013, 02:19 PM
  2. How to Permanently Remove Updater folder from Documents folder?
    By schwine1 in forum OS X - Apps and Games
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-30-2010, 06:21 PM
  3. Documents Folder Crash
    By Imdade in forum OS X - Operating System
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: 02-03-2010, 11:38 AM
  4. can you quick look links or documents before you download them?
    By mitch90 in forum OS X - Operating System
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-03-2009, 11:06 PM
  5. Deleted Documents Folder
    By jesusholdon in forum OS X - Operating System
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-11-2007, 11:27 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •