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Thread: Programming

  1. #1

    WizzKid's Avatar
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    Programming
    - sorry if its in the wrong place I didn't know where to put it -

    Anyway. I'm a 15 year old kid who is on a mission to learn some sort of programming. I know HTML and have looked at visual basic at my school.

    I was wondering if anyone knew off any programming launage that would be ok for a 15 year old. I would be interested in C and C++ but arent they abit to advance.

    Anyway it would be good if someone could direct me to a website with tutorials on it.

    I use a Imac G5 (not intel)

    Thanks in advance

    WizzKid

  2. #2
    komo
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    what kind of "programming" do you want to get yourself into? web programming or desktop programming?
    if it's web programming, starting with PHP won't be painful. it has so many resource out there on the web.
    if you want to play with desktop programming, you better learn Java and/or Objective-C, cause both of them are integrated with OS's XCode

  3. #3

    WizzKid's Avatar
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    any usueful links?

  4. #4

    WizzKid's Avatar
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    anyone??

  5. #5

    deus_ex_machina's Avatar
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  6. #6
    Logan
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    I started programming at 12. I stumbled upon this "Welcome to VC++" book that really was designed for someone who was already programming in C and was learning C++.

    Just with that book I figured out the structure, essentials... it was a major headache and I thought C++ was too hard for me.

    I stumbled upon VB around your age. Really, at your age, if you have the motivation, you can at least get familiar with any language. The key thing is to decide now what seems like the best solution to what you think you'd like to do a long time, then just stick to it. Have fun. And enjoy the benefits of being young and knowing a programming language (Everyone calls you a genius, hah). If you do it as a hobby and have time, you'll pick it up extremely fast and constantly be learning all the junk you'll need to just get certified in it.. once you can afford it.

    This is how I relate a lot of the software languages: Let's say programming is like cars. You're trying to get from point A to point B.

    Assembly: You design the car, the wheels, the fuel system, the smallest details and create the perfect machine. Some times WAAY too much work to get anything done, but it's a piece of art whatever is written in it properly.

    C++: You create the most efficient machine available. You tweak it to perfectly fit your personal desires, and it runs flawlessly. It takes you a little while to design the car but it's well worth the investment once everything is said and done.

    VB: You take someone else's chassis and engine and create a simple frame. You customize the apolostry, paint job.. and throw in a couple tweaks here or there. You get it done fast, and it may be a little crude. But it'll get the job done.

    Java: You make a economy car. The car is built to where it runs on different fuels, is highly compatible and can get around in various situations. The problem is you tend to not be as efficient as an asm/c++ car, but especially with how java has been improved lately this may (or may not) be a great investment to the future. (I keep hearing lately that benchmark tests on java are competing with C++ written for the OS!!)

    In my personal life, I have found VB the great choice. Sure my code isn't as flawless as C++, nor am I as compatible as Java, but when someone wants a program I can whip it up in surprisingly fast timing. Other programmers dislike me usually for writing in VB, plus I can only write Microsoft Windows apps (Which is annoying when you like to run OS X and other OS's), but man it's so freaking easy to learn.

    If you want I suggest... I say C++. It's bottom line the biggest of all languages. You can take what you know of C++, go to any operating system, learn the SDK/framework and you can program on all platforms. It's available on all flavors.

    Also C++ is the basis of all other programming languages usually. So you can take C++, and pick up Java.. PHP, anything really.. and you'll figure it out in no time just with the knowledge you have of C++.

    But it's also one of the harder languages to learn. Assembly I don't suggest, it is getting outdated and is very situational when you want to use it.

    Java I like and dislike.. mixed feelings really.. in the long run, I DISLIKE IT because of silly things like java beans... JUST THE NAME ALONE ugh. lol.

    As far as web programming goes, if you learn software you will think web programming is a joke in difficulty.

    Anyways, play around with all and see which language makes the most sense to you.

    And when you find it, do this:

    1) Go to the library, find a "introduction to X language" type book, or a beginner book. Find an author that makes sense to you. Don't fret if some books don't make sense, some people just can't teach well.

    2) Find a forum. Once you start reading and learning the book, use the forum for those nasty questions that arise. Most programming forums are pretty nice to beginners, as long as you're giving a real effort to learn it.

    3) Have fun.

  7. #7

    WizzKid's Avatar
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    wow thanks logan - I really want to learn more VB at home but I dont have a windows computer

  8. #8
    komo
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    Quote Originally Posted by WizzKid
    wow thanks logan - I really want to learn more VB at home but I dont have a windows computer
    if you really want to learn programming in your mac, learn Cocoa instead. i think what Cocoa to MAC OS is very much like VB to Windows.

  9. #9

    xstep's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WizzKid
    wow thanks logan - I really want to learn more VB at home but I dont have a windows computer
    Realbasic is suppose to be VB like. In fact they have tools to import VB projects. You can find out more at http://www.realsoftware.com/ where they will also sell it to you. They do however have an entry level cost and a pro cost. The pro toolset allows you to compile on one computer for the other supported systems and has database support. You don't need that now.

    I haven't used it yet. My interest is in creating a cross platform app and this looks like the tool I would use, if I don't get too side tracked by my current Cocoa interest.

    As far as picking something. You need to decide if you want to code for the desktop GUI environment or something else. You can learn alot of programming skill from any language you pick. The basics cross all languages.

    You might be able to pick up Cocoa, but a bit of programming experience is advisible. You could pick up an introduction book to C and use OS X to learn that first. Libraries are great places. I learned Apple // assembly language by checking out a book from the library, oh so many years ago. Hmm. Before you were a twinkle in your mom's eye.

    Another tool to consider is Applescript. There are one or two good books on it. It would give you the basic skills to move forward.

    What ever you choose, remember it takes some dedicated time and will cause you some frustration. But when you complete a project, big or small, you'll enjoy the accomplishment. It's neat to say 'I built that'!

  10. #10
    Logan
    Guest
    Awesome, thanks for the RealBasic reference. I'll be checking that out.

    and cocoa too.

  11. #11
    Logan
    Guest
    Talking RealBasic
    So I tried out RealBasic. Made a simple program,

    OSX: (source)



    WinXP: (source)



    Linux and Wine (Slackware with KDE) (source)



    Looks like the Linux compiler is just a GTK+ 2.0 conversion, it has a Visual Basic to RealBasic converter... I'll play with it more and see how well it does more complex programs. Fun little tool though!

    Cocoa is very C++ looking. I'll have to sit down more to figure it out properly.

  12. #12

    WizzKid's Avatar
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    thanks for everything, and reallbasic seems for me but ill look at it for a wee bit more before i buy it!!!

  13. #13
    Logan
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    For my quick simple example, here's the source

    I created the static text that contains the text you read. In VB this object was called Labels, but the difference is minor enough I'm not really concerned. The properties closely resemble VB also.

    object Timer1, with a behavior property tweak of 500 period (default: 1000)
    (As per VB, this object property was called Timer1.interval, they changed it to period)

    (1000 represents the delay before it runs the code, so every 1000ms (1 second) it would run the given event)

    I created a Progress Bar action. progressbar1 kept it's default values, where justlike VB you have minimum and maximum to set your range of the progress, and also value which is it's current value.

    The code for Timer1's Action_Sub is:
    Code:
      progressbar1.Value = progressbar1.Value + 5
      if progressbar1.value = 100 then
        progressbar1.value = 0
      end if
    So what does it do? it simply makes the progress bar progress every half a second by 5%. If the progress gets to 100% it resets it to 0%.

  14. #14
    Logan
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    My big Q & A about RealBasic:

    1 Q) Does it support custom API manipulation on multiple platforms, and can you create platform dependant code routines?

    2 A) Platform API's

    API usage is different in REALbasic than in Visual Basic. REALbasic is richer due to its support for Windows, Linux, Mac OS X and Mac Classic. Just as you use a UDT in Visual Basic, you can use a Structure in REALbasic to define a custom data structure for use with the Declare statement. You will need to do some homework to ensure there is a replacement for your target OS. I suggest carefully thinking about why you are using an API call. In some cases an API call is no longer necessary because REALbasic includes support for the desired feature within the REALbasic class framework itself.

    However, you should feel comfortable that you can mix and match platform-specific code using REALbasic as shown below.

    #If TargetMacOS Then
    //Mac specific code here.
    #ElseIf TargetWin32 Then
    //Windows code goes here.
    #ElseIf TargetLinux Then
    //Linux code goes right here.
    #EndIf

    2 Q) Does it support ActiveX Controls? This was a feature that made VB actually shine with simplicity and power.

    2 A) Both [VB + RB] support ActiveX controls or OLE (Windows only!), but REALbasic also supports cross-platform "Plug-ins." Since Mac and Linux do not support ActiveX, ActiveX controls will not port to other operating systems, even though they will port to REALbasic Windows builds.

    I keep seeing more and more positives about this OS. If anyone is interested, I can start writing a review about it in a topic on these forums. Or I can just blog it I suppose.

  15. #15

    cazabam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Logan
    If you want I suggest... I say C++. It's bottom line the biggest of all languages. You can take what you know of C++, go to any operating system, learn the SDK/framework and you can program on all platforms. It's available on all flavors.

    Also C++ is the basis of all other programming languages usually. So you can take C++, and pick up Java.. PHP, anything really.. and you'll figure it out in no time just with the knowledge you have of C++.
    Just a clarification, really. C++ is most certainly not the same on other platforms - the APIs each platform uses vary considerably, and the different compilers can have many different quirks and defficiencies.

    I think you were specifically thinking of C, which is what most operating systems are written in and has been properly standardised for so long that it pretty much is cross platform compatible (as long as the libraries you use are available - open source ones usually are).

    Don't worry, there is a reason for this beyond nit-picking! The thing is that C++ is a set of object oriented extensions for the C language that has been butchered over time by different companies. There is another set of object oriented extensions to C that is usually considered more stable and compatible; Objective C.

    The point here is Mac OS X, especially Cocoa apps, are written in Objective C, not C++. Windows primarily uses C++, and other unix variants use a mix of C, C++ and Objective C. Xcode supports writing apps in Objective C and Java for Cocoa out of the box, so it's probably a good place to start for GUI apps on Mac OS X.

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