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OS X - Development and Darwin Discussion and questions about development for Mac OS X.

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MGufman

 
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I just downloaded Xcode, Dashcode, and Instruments but I have no clue on how to use them. I am considering purchasing this book Amazon.com: Cocoa(R) Programming for Mac(R) OS X (3rd Edition): Aaron Hillegass: Books because it is the most recently published and i read one review that said they would recommend it if you were starting from scratch but I am still skeptical. Does anyone know if this book is useful for a beginner or of a up to date book that is?
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deer dance

 
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From what I've heard the book's pretty useful.

As for being up-to-date, check the publishing year.


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vansmith

 
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I'm not sure if you're new to programming or just obj-c and xcode but if you're new to programming in general, might I suggest a "simpler" language to start (something like Python or Java)?
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deer dance

 
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Java isn't simple

Python on the other hand

Learn it, Know it, Live it

Also, if you run Windows via Boot Camp or a virtual machine, or even on a separate computer.
And you actually use it,

I suggest learning Batch
Batch is one of the simplest languages in existence, if not the simplest, though since the release of Python 3000, I'm not so sure anymore...


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vansmith

 
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Originally Posted by deer dance View Post
Java isn't simple
Better than obj-c. It also preps you better for c/c++ if you go down that route (can't say if it will prep you for obj-c because I avoid it like the Plague).

I agree 100% with you on Python. It's a beautiful language.
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mystic_fm

 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MGufman View Post
I just downloaded Xcode, Dashcode, and Instruments but I have no clue on how to use them. I am considering purchasing this book Amazon.com: Cocoa(R) Programming for Mac(R) OS X (3rd Edition): Aaron Hillegass: Books because it is the most recently published and i read one review that said they would recommend it if you were starting from scratch but I am still skeptical. Does anyone know if this book is useful for a beginner or of a up to date book that is?
It depends on your overall programming experience, and I think you are right to be skeptical about the "starting from scratch" review you quoted. The preface of Hillegass's book states it is intended for programmers new to Objective-C and Mac programming but who know at least some C programming and a little bit about objects in general, and I agree with that assessment. If you have done programming but nothing in C, then I'd suggest that you get a basic book on C and start with that before tackling Obj-C or Cocoa. If you haven't done programming at all, then I think the Python recommendation above could be a good place to start, since a Python environment is already on your Mac and there are numerous introductory Python tutorials to be found on the web.
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scathe

 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deer dance View Post
Java isn't simple

Python on the other hand

Learn it, Know it, Live it

Also, if you run Windows via Boot Camp or a virtual machine, or even on a separate computer.
And you actually use it,

I suggest learning Batch
Batch is one of the simplest languages in existence, if not the simplest, though since the release of Python 3000, I'm not so sure anymore...
I have to disagree, Java is a perfect language to start with, no point starting with something that isn't object-oriented and even the Java syntax is very easy to comprehend and the libraries are sufficient for anything you will run into at this point ... but I guess that's just my point of view

on the other hand, I do agree that Objective-C isn't the best first language to learn
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I have to agree with scathe. While not a Java programmer myself, I did take intro courses to programming and some taught Java because it is a good language to get a grasp on OOP, especially if you're new to the concept. That and the fact that Java is so pervasive makes it an ideal language to start with.

That said, as a Python programmer myself, I would still recommend it .
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mystic_fm

 
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My only concern about a total programming neophyte learning Java as a 1st language is that being introduced to the object paradigm at the same time as they are trying to understand basic flow control structures might prove a little overwhelming. However, I could be in part biased by my own history of having learned the fundamentals of programming at least fifteen years before object-oriented languages started appearing in production environments. Perhaps for someone starting out today it does make sense to introduce objects right alongside loops and conditionals.

Edit: As a side note, in the last few years I've been noticing some movement away from object-oriented programming in some of the production environments I've encountered. I've even heard a phrase that's new to me: "inheritance from ****" (H, E, double hockey sticks). I find it to be a troubling development, actually.
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