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  1. #16

    chscag's Avatar
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    Late 2013 27" iMac, iPad 3, iPhone 6s+, iPhone 6+, 3 iPods, Sierra
    Most commercial 4 hour DVD movies are placed on double layer media or Blue Ray disks; both are much larger than 1 GB. I've got several that easily exceed 4 GB.

  2. #17


    Member Since
    Jan 22, 2010
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    Victoria, BC
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    Mid-2012 MBP (16GB, 1TB HD), Monoprice 24-inch second monitor, iPhone 5s 32GB, iPad Air 2 64GB
    And of course it depends on the format. Bottom line: not many files routinely reach sizes of 4GB, but HD movie files easily do.

  3. #18


    Member Since
    Dec 11, 2008
    Location
    New york
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    636
    we solved this problem, the friend purchased 2 externals, one will be a backup to the backup, so we reformatted one to work with both mac and pc just in case and the other we formatted for mac using the journaled option.

  4. #19

    chscag's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jan 23, 2008
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    Late 2013 27" iMac, iPad 3, iPhone 6s+, iPhone 6+, 3 iPods, Sierra
    Well, that's certainly one way to solve it. Thanks for letting us know.

  5. #20

    bobtomay's Avatar
    Member Since
    Dec 22, 2006
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    Texas, where else?
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    15" MBP '06 2.33 C2D 4GB 10.7; 13" MBA '14 1.8 i7 8GB 10.11; 21" iMac '13 2.9 i5 8GB 10.11; 6S
    Those that answered that question on yahoo haven't got a clue what size a commercial DVD movie is.

    A good commercial 480p transfer to DVD is practically always going to be in the 4 GB neighborhood if not larger - as noted by chscag, many of those discs are dual layered in order to get the whole movie onto a single disc.

    If they were only 700 MB, they could be put on a CD and not even have to use a DVD.
    Bunch of torrent kiddies use to getting junky quality video and not caring 2 bits about quality - only that it's free - is what those answers indicate.
    I cannot be held responsible for the things that come out of my mouth.
    In the Windows world, most everything folks don't understand is called a virus.

  6. #21


    Member Since
    Jun 01, 2011
    Posts
    10
    My experience:
    I'm a video editor -- all Mac at home, and all PC at work.

    I format any drives that I intend to use in both places -- this includes thumb drives as well as 250gb or 2tb externals -- as ExFAT, via Disk Utility on the Mac.

    This way I can load generic material that I take from job to job (video backgrounds, sound effects, etc.) at home and then just connect the drives to the PCs at work.

    It also allows me to copy samples of the work I've cut -- many times well over 4gb -- from the PC's and bring them home to archive & use for my sample reel, created on my Macs.

    So far I've had no problems.

    BTW -- a DVD is 4.7gb, and a dual layer is, I guess, double that. So it it's full and you want to copy it to a drive, you'll have a problem unless it's formatted as ExFAT.

  7. #22


    Member Since
    Jul 18, 2012
    Posts
    3
    exFAT is the newest format, and was devised to allow the device to be used (read and write) by both Mac and PC. Unlike the old FAT format, there is no 4GB file size limit.

    I have been using this format for more than two years with video files with both Macs & PCs (me working on a Mac and collaborators working on PCs) without any issues. I really can't see why anyone would use any other format nowadays.

  8. #23


    Member Since
    Dec 11, 2008
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    New york
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    636
    Ok, noted for future use, thanks!

  9. #24

    chscag's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jan 23, 2008
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    Keller, Texas
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    Specs:
    Late 2013 27" iMac, iPad 3, iPhone 6s+, iPhone 6+, 3 iPods, Sierra
    I have been using this format for more than two years with video files with both Macs & PCs (me working on a Mac and collaborators working on PCs) without any issues. I really can't see why anyone would use any other format nowadays.
    It's (exFAT) still a non journaling file system and like its little brother (FAT-32) is prone to errors that are non recoverable. NTFS and HFS+ are journaled file systems which allow for better error recovery. You've been lucky so far......

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