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  1. #1

    PsychologyGuy's Avatar
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    MKV file help (1080p movie)
    Hey guys, I have a mkv 1080p, about 12gb movie file that I would like to be able to watch on my tv here at home (1080i). I was wondering if it would be a possibility to burn this movie onto a dvd by converting to a compatible format or something or if it would just be much more simple to buy a mini port adapter so that I can just hook up my mac straight to the tv.
    Thanks
    2010 MacBook Pro 2.4 GHz 4 GB Ram (First Mac and I love it!)

  2. #2

    chscag's Avatar
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    Buy the adapter and save yourself possible headaches. That file won't even fit on DL media without some form of compression. Now if you had a Blue Ray burner....

    Regards.

  3. #3

    PsychologyGuy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chscag View Post
    Buy the adapter and save yourself possible headaches. That file won't even fit on DL media without some form of compression. Now if you had a Blue Ray burner....

    Regards.
    ahhh blue ray burner would be nice but...$$ I think I might just go ahead and get the adapter. I've found some on ebay. In your opinion, do you think the quality would be good compared to if I would go to apple.com and buy one?
    2010 MacBook Pro 2.4 GHz 4 GB Ram (First Mac and I love it!)

  4. #4

    bobtomay's Avatar
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    I would suggest monoprice.com or amazon instead of ebay for practically all your cable needs.
    I cannot be held responsible for the things that come out of my mouth.
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  5. #5

    schweb's Avatar
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    monoprice.com makes awesome adapters and cables that are really inexpensive. You might want to check them out. I buy from them all the time.
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  6. #6


    Member Since
    Feb 25, 2009
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    Which MBP do you have? the 13" with the 320m or the 15" with the 330M?

    If you have the 13", with that level of a file - if you don't have it, get Plex, and look thru the plex Blog and get the binary replacement that has hardware decoding (there are instructions on where in the app package to replace the existing file - it's a release from one of the devs to kind of show us all where they're heading with playback capabilities). They've done a really nice job with it using hardware acceleration on H.264 video; even video contained in mkv files. I don't see my 2GHz mini with a 9400m exceed about 60% (on a max of 200% if both cores in full use) with 1080p footage @30-35mbps with smooth playback.
    My Macs: Late 2013 rMBP w/ 750m, 16Gig ram; 2013 Mac Pro 6 core w/ D700, 16Gig Ram; Mac mini G4, 1.25 GHz, 512m ram (server); Late 2011 11" MBA, 1.8GHz i7, 4Gig Ram, 256Gig SSD, HD3000; Powerbook 12" G4 1.33GHz running Linux; Apple TV (1080p version)

  7. #7

    PsychologyGuy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobtomay View Post
    I would suggest monoprice.com or amazon instead of ebay for practically all your cable needs.
    Quote Originally Posted by schweb View Post
    monoprice.com makes awesome adapters and cables that are really inexpensive. You might want to check them out. I buy from them all the time.
    thanks, I'll check it out.
    2010 MacBook Pro 2.4 GHz 4 GB Ram (First Mac and I love it!)

  8. #8

    PsychologyGuy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nethfel View Post
    Which MBP do you have? the 13" with the 320m or the 15" with the 330M?

    If you have the 13", with that level of a file - if you don't have it, get Plex, and look thru the plex Blog and get the binary replacement that has hardware decoding (there are instructions on where in the app package to replace the existing file - it's a release from one of the devs to kind of show us all where they're heading with playback capabilities). They've done a really nice job with it using hardware acceleration on H.264 video; even video contained in mkv files. I don't see my 2GHz mini with a 9400m exceed about 60% (on a max of 200% if both cores in full use) with 1080p footage @30-35mbps with smooth playback.
    what is that? The movie plays fine on my mac as is- why do I need that? Just asking, don't mean to sound rude.
    2010 MacBook Pro 2.4 GHz 4 GB Ram (First Mac and I love it!)

  9. #9


    Member Since
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    Well, you may not need it. But, depending on how you play back, it may be using a lot of CPU power to do the playback. On some systems as bitrates get very high in video it can cause dropped frames and not-so-fluid playback causing annoying stutters. Personally I prefer hardware H.264 video decoding (in the case of playback on the computer, this means using the video card to decode and render the H.264 compressed material) as it tends to offer smooth playback even at extremely high bitrates. Software decoding tends to utilize a lot of CPU power depending on the source material and some people prefer to offload that work to the GPU if possible.

    If you're not having a problem with stuttering then you don't need it, if you find that your video seems to have hiccups or stutters during playback then you need a way to use hardware acceleration.

    Unless things changed in 10.6.4 that was just released, quicktime only does hardware acceleration on MP4/M4V/MOV that has H.264 video in it, which means other containers don't benefit from hardware decoding.

    Here's a tidbit on hardware decoding: H.264/MPEG-4 AVC - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    My Macs: Late 2013 rMBP w/ 750m, 16Gig ram; 2013 Mac Pro 6 core w/ D700, 16Gig Ram; Mac mini G4, 1.25 GHz, 512m ram (server); Late 2011 11" MBA, 1.8GHz i7, 4Gig Ram, 256Gig SSD, HD3000; Powerbook 12" G4 1.33GHz running Linux; Apple TV (1080p version)

  10. #10

    PsychologyGuy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nethfel View Post
    Well, you may not need it. But, depending on how you play back, it may be using a lot of CPU power to do the playback. On some systems as bitrates get very high in video it can cause dropped frames and not-so-fluid playback causing annoying stutters. Personally I prefer hardware H.264 video decoding (in the case of playback on the computer, this means using the video card to decode and render the H.264 compressed material) as it tends to offer smooth playback even at extremely high bitrates. Software decoding tends to utilize a lot of CPU power depending on the source material and some people prefer to offload that work to the GPU if possible.

    If you're not having a problem with stuttering then you don't need it, if you find that your video seems to have hiccups or stutters during playback then you need a way to use hardware acceleration.

    Unless things changed in 10.6.4 that was just released, quicktime only does hardware acceleration on MP4/M4V/MOV that has H.264 video in it, which means other containers don't benefit from hardware decoding.

    Here's a tidbit on hardware decoding: H.264/MPEG-4 AVC - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    oh I see, I'll keep that in mind if I ever see my video become choppy. Thanks for the suggestion.
    2010 MacBook Pro 2.4 GHz 4 GB Ram (First Mac and I love it!)

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