Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1


    Member Since
    Dec 20, 2009
    Location
    Exeter, Ca
    Posts
    8
    Specs:
    Mac OS X 10.5.8 / 2 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo / 2 GB 667 MHz DDR2 SDRAM / 640 GB WD Scorpio Blue
    Need advice for encoding Video-TS to Divx format with DVD quality
    Hi, this is my first thread started here at mac forums and haven't had a whole lot of experience with this site, I must say though that most everybody is friendly and helpful and that's something that I appreciate in a forum. I'm new to video encoding and need some advice. I have a couple of movies that I would like to encode to Divx format to keep on my Mac's HD for a trip that I am taking so that I don't have to carry the movies with me. I use MTR to rip the Video-TS files and am using D-Vision 3.2 to encode the files. D-Vision gives me a few options when it comes to the bitrate, I can choose a file size limit and D-vision will adjust the bitrate to keep the movie under that specific size or I have the option to choose the maximum bitrate and D-vision will encode up to but not exceed the bitrate that was specified. Size isn't really an issue since i just upgraded to a 640 GB HD, what I'm looking to do is to encode these movies in Divx format (or any other format compatible with my mac) to create the nearest to DVD quality that I can. Here are a couple of pics of some of the options for video and audio encoding. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.


  2. #2


    Member Since
    Dec 20, 2009
    Location
    Exeter, Ca
    Posts
    8
    Specs:
    Mac OS X 10.5.8 / 2 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo / 2 GB 667 MHz DDR2 SDRAM / 640 GB WD Scorpio Blue
    anybody?

  3. #3

    Kevriano's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jul 02, 2006
    Location
    Crawley, England
    Posts
    4,558
    Specs:
    20" Intel iMac 2.4 Ghz/3G Ram/320HD, Snow Leopard. PBook G4, 1.5Ghz/1.5 Ram/250 HD, Leopard 10.5.6.
    Personally I would keep the frame rate high, as it makes for smoother viewing, and as for quality, if size isn't an issue, select max quality.
    Most HQ Divx files will run out at around 1.37 GB in my experience.
    Audio is fine at 128 unless you are listening with really good headphones/speakers.
    Try my custom Mac Forums Search Engine: Mac Forums Google Search

    Please use the reputation system if you consider any help given useful (it's the little ✓/✘ on the left <---)


  4. #4


    Member Since
    Dec 20, 2009
    Location
    Exeter, Ca
    Posts
    8
    Specs:
    Mac OS X 10.5.8 / 2 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo / 2 GB 667 MHz DDR2 SDRAM / 640 GB WD Scorpio Blue
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevriano View Post
    Personally I would keep the frame rate high, as it makes for smoother viewing, and as for quality, if size isn't an issue, select max quality.
    Most HQ Divx files will run out at around 1.37 GB in my experience.
    Audio is fine at 128 unless you are listening with really good headphones/speakers.
    The Divx files usually end up around that size. Now what do you mean by framerate? I usually just leave the framerate alone as D-vision will automatically set the framerate to equal that of the VOB. Also what's the difference in video quality between framerate and bitrate when encoding to divx?

  5. #5

    Kevriano's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jul 02, 2006
    Location
    Crawley, England
    Posts
    4,558
    Specs:
    20" Intel iMac 2.4 Ghz/3G Ram/320HD, Snow Leopard. PBook G4, 1.5Ghz/1.5 Ram/250 HD, Leopard 10.5.6.
    Well the framerate should be constant in most programs, and the higher the better, leaving it is fine.
    If you lower it pictures run less smoothly, so you can get jerky motion for example. Anything above 25fps is fine generally though.
    Bit rate is just like bit rate selection when ripping mp3 for example, so 128 MP3 is generally poor, where as 320 is high and virtually indistinguishable form the original CD, therefore, apply that principle to bit rate encoding in Divx and you can't go wrong. The higher the bitrate, the sharper the picture.
    That said, the encoder itself can vary. I have some amazing quality avi, that are only 700 mb, and are the equal of DVD's, and some Divx that are bigger files but worse quality, so it's often a case of playing around a little.
    Just curious, if size isn't an issue, why convert?
    Try my custom Mac Forums Search Engine: Mac Forums Google Search

    Please use the reputation system if you consider any help given useful (it's the little ✓/✘ on the left <---)


  6. #6


    Member Since
    Dec 20, 2009
    Location
    Exeter, Ca
    Posts
    8
    Specs:
    Mac OS X 10.5.8 / 2 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo / 2 GB 667 MHz DDR2 SDRAM / 640 GB WD Scorpio Blue
    Well there's a few reasons behind converting, one being that I'm leaving on a trip in the middle of January and would like to have a digital copy to view on my mac. Another being the simple joy of understanding my mac and it's potential. I love to fiddle with programs, ones involving video especially, and learning these skills are important to me (at least it gives me satisfaction knowing that I have learned something new). If you don't mind me asking, what programs do you use to convert and how do you go about it?

  7. #7

    Kevriano's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jul 02, 2006
    Location
    Crawley, England
    Posts
    4,558
    Specs:
    20" Intel iMac 2.4 Ghz/3G Ram/320HD, Snow Leopard. PBook G4, 1.5Ghz/1.5 Ram/250 HD, Leopard 10.5.6.
    Ok that's cool. Personally I would just use VLC player to view the Video_TS folder though, then no conversion is needed.
    Anyway, when I do wish to convert I will either use Handbrake:

    HandBrake

    Or ffmpegx:

    ffmpegX a DVD, SVCD, VCD, CVD, VOB, DivX, XviD, H.264, PSP, iPod, MP4, MOV, FLV encoder for Mac OSX

    Both are very good, and have many functions to fiddle with. I tend to use ffmpegx for joining Avi's more than anything else, and Handbrake for other things. That said ffmegx is a very good and quick converter.
    Try my custom Mac Forums Search Engine: Mac Forums Google Search

    Please use the reputation system if you consider any help given useful (it's the little ✓/✘ on the left <---)


  8. #8


    Member Since
    Dec 20, 2009
    Location
    Exeter, Ca
    Posts
    8
    Specs:
    Mac OS X 10.5.8 / 2 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo / 2 GB 667 MHz DDR2 SDRAM / 640 GB WD Scorpio Blue
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevriano View Post
    Ok that's cool. Personally I would just use VLC player to view the Video_TS folder though, then no conversion is needed.
    Anyway, when I do wish to convert I will either use Handbrake:

    HandBrake

    Or ffmpegx:

    ffmpegX a DVD, SVCD, VCD, CVD, VOB, DivX, XviD, H.264, PSP, iPod, MP4, MOV, FLV encoder for Mac OSX

    Both are very good, and have many functions to fiddle with. I tend to use ffmpegx for joining Avi's more than anything else, and Handbrake for other things. That said ffmegx is a very good and quick converter.
    i'll try ffmpegx, I have it but have never used it lol. Ty for the tips btw. if anybody else has any other input that would be appreciated as well.

  9. #9

    BenB's Avatar
    Member Since
    May 22, 2009
    Location
    Southeast Louisiana
    Posts
    144
    I'd go with MPEGStreamClip, it gives you more options.
    Apple Certified Master Trainer
    bbalser.com
    FCPXProUniversity.com
    LouisianaCajunCutters.org

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-22-2011, 01:32 AM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-06-2010, 06:20 PM
  3. advice about quality/age of video card
    By LIVLUVLAF in forum Switcher Hangout
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-04-2010, 12:38 AM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-18-2009, 08:23 AM
  5. Burn Divx video to play on DVD player
    By corywiley in forum OS X - Apps and Games
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-26-2009, 10:46 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •