Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 37
  1. #1


    Member Since
    Feb 14, 2010
    Posts
    262
    Reading on the iPad..for real!
    I've read several times that reading with iBooks or other reading application is not that pleasant. Anyone could give some feedback on their own experience reading books on the iPad?

  2. #2

    Kash's Avatar
    Member Since
    Dec 03, 2006
    Location
    Irvine, CA
    Posts
    9,385
    Specs:
    Black Macbook C2D 2GHz 3GB RAM 250GB HD iPhone 4 iPad 3G
    Here's my question: do you read things on your monitor?

    June 2007
    July 2009

  3. #3

    pigoo3's Avatar
    Member Since
    May 20, 2008
    Location
    U.S.
    Posts
    34,831
    Specs:
    2011 13" MBP 2.3ghz, 8gig ram, OS 10.8.5
    Quote Originally Posted by Kash View Post
    Here's my question: do you read things on your monitor?
    Brilliant Kash...Brilliant!!!

    You must have had a Red Bull today!

    - Nick
    - Too many "beachballs", read this: Beachballs
    - Computer seems slower than it used to? Read this for some slow computer tips: Speedup
    - Almost full hard drive? Some solutions. Out of Space
    - Apple Battery Info. Battery

  4. #4

    Bremen Cole's Avatar
    Member Since
    Apr 15, 2010
    Location
    Home, in Texas
    Posts
    55
    Specs:
    PC Baby!
    iPad reads great. Many people like me have sold there Sony, Kindle .... Readers because the iPad is better for them. There are some people who like the dull eInk display of current readers, but many prefer the iPad....

    Also on the ipad you are not limited by format. I can read ePubs (iBooks, Kobo reader) or PDF (Goodreader) Kindle (Kindle app) Fictionwise or eReader.com (ereader app) all on the iPad. The others are restrictive.
    Bremen Cole
    iPad 1st Gen 16G WIFI
    Music = http://www.bremencole.com
    Bike Journal = http://www.bikejournal.com/journal_p...ame=BremenCole

  5. #5

    bobtomay's Avatar
    Member Since
    Dec 22, 2006
    Location
    Texas, where else?
    Posts
    26,466
    Specs:
    15" MBP '06 2.33 C2D 4GB 10.7; 13" MBA '14 1.8 i7 8GB 10.11; 21" iMac '13 2.9 i5 8GB 10.11; 6S
    Personally, i seriously doubt that most of the ones writing those articles have used the iPad, as in more than what was required for the review they wrote. I doubt most of them even own one of the e-ink readers either. What you're seeing is the reiteration of one of the reasons behind the advent of e-ink technology. In most cases a poor reiteration because they don't have a clue and are just re-stating what they saw as one of the cons in one of the other reviews they read before writing their own.

    The primary issue for most folks is that they have never learned how to use the brightness level on their computer monitors to adjust for existing lighting conditions and their own light sensitivity.

    I have never met anyone as light sensitive as I am. Just asked the wife, says she hasn't either. I am probably one of the few that have never lost a pair of sun glasses, at least not during the daytime... because I am unable to get 2 feet outside the door. Quite literally, I cannot see moving from one lighting condition to another.

    This is drastically more important reading text on a screen than it is with watching video. Just think about it, staring at a white lit up screen really isn't much different than looking at a lit light bulb. Between staring at Excel spreadsheets all day at work, plus my home computing habits... imho, if I can learn how to adjust brightness levels, which I do multiple times a day, then anyone else can also.

    People are going to be subject to eyestrain, whether it's from staring at a computer monitor, a musician staring at sheet music, or reading a regular old printed book for hours during the day.
    I cannot be held responsible for the things that come out of my mouth.
    In the Windows world, most everything folks don't understand is called a virus.

  6. #6


    Member Since
    Apr 14, 2010
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by bobtomay View Post
    Personally, i seriously doubt that most of the ones writing those articles have used the iPad, as in more than what was required for the review they wrote. I doubt most of them even own one of the e-ink readers either. What you're seeing is the reiteration of one of the reasons behind the advent of e-ink technology. In most cases a poor reiteration because they don't have a clue and are just re-stating what they saw as one of the cons in one of the other reviews they read before writing their own.

    The primary issue for most folks is that they have never learned how to use the brightness level on their computer monitors to adjust for existing lighting conditions and their own light sensitivity.


    People are going to be subject to eyestrain, whether it's from staring at a computer monitor, a musician staring at sheet music, or reading a regular old printed book for hours during the day.

    I agree completely with what you said. Heck, the ONLY time I notice eyestrain/fatigue is when my monitor is too DIM! Reading on the iPad will be just as nice as reading on my iPhone, and BETTER than reading on any of my computers because I'll be able to hold it just like a book or magazine.

  7. #7


    Member Since
    Jun 02, 2008
    Posts
    709
    Well, I have noticed a difference. I can read longer on the nook than I can on my laptop without taking a break. Also, it is a lot easier to read on the nook out at the beach then with the laptop. In fact, using the IPad outside with the sunlight was hard to see and the Nook was a breeze. There are ups and downs for both but I plan on buying another Nook for us and avoiding the IPad for now. I want something that can be used as a reader outdoors.

  8. #8


    Member Since
    Apr 14, 2010
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by DaFlake View Post
    Well, I have noticed a difference. I can read longer on the nook than I can on my laptop without taking a break. Also, it is a lot easier to read on the nook out at the beach then with the laptop. In fact, using the IPad outside with the sunlight was hard to see and the Nook was a breeze. There are ups and downs for both but I plan on buying another Nook for us and avoiding the IPad for now. I want something that can be used as a reader outdoors.

    I'll bet what's making the bigger difference in your comfort between the nook & laptop are the drastic ergonomic differences of the two devices.

    I rarely read more than a few paragraphs on any of my computers (unless I absolutely have to) but will spend an hour on my iPhone without even thinking about it. I'll bet the iPad will be even more fun to read on.

    April 30 can't come soon enough!

  9. #9


    Member Since
    Jun 02, 2008
    Posts
    709
    Nope, I like to read at the beach and you can't read on the Iphone or the IPad. I have tried both...

    Just not good for me.

  10. #10

    bobtomay's Avatar
    Member Since
    Dec 22, 2006
    Location
    Texas, where else?
    Posts
    26,466
    Specs:
    15" MBP '06 2.33 C2D 4GB 10.7; 13" MBA '14 1.8 i7 8GB 10.11; 21" iMac '13 2.9 i5 8GB 10.11; 6S
    Quote Originally Posted by DaFlake View Post
    Well, I have noticed a difference. I can read longer on the nook than I can on my laptop without taking a break. Also, it is a lot easier to read on the nook out at the beach then with the laptop. In fact, using the IPad outside with the sunlight was hard to see and the Nook was a breeze. There are ups and downs for both but I plan on buying another Nook for us and avoiding the IPad for now. I want something that can be used as a reader outdoors.
    You're definitely correct about trying to read out in full sunshine that a kindle or nook would be better. However, since putting the anti-glare screen on my iPad, the only issue now is with the sun shining directly on it. Even with just a slight angle it is now readable, and with the screen in my own shadow or sitting in the shade, feel it's every bit as good as our kindle.

    For those wanting a device strictly for reading text, I would also recommend saving the difference in price and go with one of the ereaders on the market. Well, unless your reading is done primarily in dark or poorly lit rooms, then the iPad wins hands down.

    There is also something to be said for a 7 day battery.

    They each have their place within the niche.
    I cannot be held responsible for the things that come out of my mouth.
    In the Windows world, most everything folks don't understand is called a virus.

  11. #11


    Member Since
    Jan 29, 2010
    Location
    Palm Beach Gardens, FL
    Posts
    89
    Specs:
    17" Macbook Pro with 2.8GHz Core 2 Duo, 4GB 1066MHz DDR3, 500GB Serial ATA @ 7200 rpm, HiRes AntiGla
    I have a sony reader that is great, and I read books on my iphone. (havent recieved my ipad yet) So I have experience with both types of screens. Yes, the sony reader looks more like an actual piece of paper but I LOVE reading on my iphone. I have spent hours reading on it with stanza. iBook is one of the main reasons that I am getting an ipad and im sure i will use it more than any other app. So personally, i have never gotten eye strain or fatigue reading on my iphone.
    I love to jump out of perfectly good airplanes!

  12. #12

    Ryne's Avatar
    Member Since
    Apr 24, 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    10
    I was skeptical of the iPad's usefulness as an eReader. I was wrong.

    It is extremely pleasing, and easily customizable for particular needs. As mentioned, brightness can have a great effect on comfort, and the iPad makes dialing in a sweet spot quite simple. As the selection of titles increases I can imagine this device easily overtaking the Kindle.

    I'm a relatively new convert to Apple products (iPhone and now iPad), and am glad I made the leap.
    My Short Fiction At Dark & Darker

    Follow Me On Twitter

  13. #13


    Member Since
    Apr 02, 2010
    Posts
    50
    I know people who have tried to use an LCD-screen device to read books on and have had a problem with it. A genuine problem. That said I have read on an LCD screen in the past as my primary method of reading books, and I didn't have any issues with getting headaches or blurry vision or anything.

    If you sit at your computer screen for hours on end and read for the majority of that time, then that should be a good indicator of whether or not you would like an iPad as an ebook reader.

  14. #14


    Member Since
    Jul 26, 2009
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    196
    Specs:
    Mid 12 MBP 8gb ram, Crucial M4 SSD 512gb, Sandy Bridge i7
    Have a look at this:

    iPad has 'changed' 99-year-old woman's life | The Digital Home - CNET News

    If this young lady can do it, I hope that we can too.

  15. #15


    Member Since
    Jun 02, 2008
    Posts
    709
    I'm not saying that you can't read on it. I just couldn't easily read on it out in the sun where I like to read. E-ink works better for this...

    I'll stick to my e-reader for now.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. iPad reading list problems
    By supbng in forum iOS and Apps
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 08-09-2014, 05:37 AM
  2. iPad reading list problems
    By supbng in forum Switcher Hangout
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 07-20-2014, 05:05 AM
  3. So that 128GB iPad? Itís real, and itís available from Apple on Feb. 5
    By OneMoreThing... in forum Apple Rumors and Reports
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-29-2013, 10:10 PM
  4. Reading pdf on iPad and paging down
    By abdu in forum iOS and Apps
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 12-14-2011, 10:14 PM
  5. Real ipad competitor or just another wannabe?
    By the8thark in forum Schweb's Lounge
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 11-12-2010, 08:11 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •