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Internet, Networking, and Wireless Discussion of networking, internet, and wireless including Apple's Airport products.

wired network info needed


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deldakota

 
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ok here goes, i decided i want to stay hardwired for my in home network. my imac is connected to the internet via verizon dsl, and i want to give kids gateway upstairs internet access. should i use a "hub" or "switch"?? not sure what the difference is? what else besides the ethernet cable will i need? please dont tell me to use a wireless router, im not interested in that...thanks in advance for any info.
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Wired Ethernet hubs support basic file sharing and connection sharing for home networks with or without Internet service.

Wired Ethernet switches support fast file sharing and connection sharing for home networks (with or without Internet service). Ethernet switches support higher-bandwidth applications like gaming and sharing of large files. Like hubs, switches also support multiple operating systems.

A wired Ethernet broadband router supports fast file sharing and connection sharing for cable modem or DSL Internet services. These home routers integrate the functions of a traditional Ethernet switch, a DHCP server, and a firewall for convenience. These routers usually cost less than equivalent wireless routers.

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deldakota

 
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thanks for your reply, and excuse my ignorance in this, but im guessing i will have a cable come out of the little black verizon dsl modem, then go into a switch or hub, and thats where i would connect the computers? thanks.
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That's about it!
I would recommend a router though. It will serve the same purpose, but enable you to have more control and ease of setup. (firewall, automatic ip setup, etc..)
I know your not interested in wireless, however I would recommend a "combination" router. You can get some with 4 ports for wired and still have a wireless option for future use. This is actually how I started. I used all wired connections, but later found that the setup of all the computers, it was easier to manage locations. The link below is similar to what I use now.
If you have any questions, please let me know!
http://www.linksys.com/servlet/Satel...=7724139789B06

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Quote:
Originally Posted by deldakota View Post
thanks for your reply, and excuse my ignorance in this, but im guessing i will have a cable come out of the little black verizon dsl modem, then go into a switch or hub, and thats where i would connect the computers? thanks.
You'll want to get a wired router, like this model:

http://www.dlink.com/products/?sec=1&pid=478

Although a switch could be made to work, the price differential is not huge and you'll find a wired router to be pretty much plug and play.

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jaynorris

 
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Why not a Switch? I mean after all the real difference between a switch is with the broadcasting. Hub, a layer 1 device will broadcasts on all ports, whereas a switch, a layer 2 device will not - it's smarter :-). Same is true with a Router, but as layer 3 device... In that order is broadband WAN to the Router LAN. Router to the Switch and the Switch to a Hub if need be. That's the correct way.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaynorris View Post
Why not a Switch? I mean after all the real difference between a switch is with the broadcasting. Hub, a layer 1 device will broadcasts on all ports, whereas a switch, a layer 2 device will not - it's smarter :-). Same is true with a Router, but as layer 3 device... In that order is broadband WAN to the Router LAN. Router to the Switch and the Switch to a Hub if need be. That's the correct way.
Because the price differential is insignificant and the router affords NAT routing, which adds an additional layer of security as well as making it plug and play.

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Also, your average cable Internet provider gives out one IP address per modem. You want to use a router to take the one IP Address and share it with the 3 - 4 computers behind it, using NAT. This also give you a 4-port switch, which will allow your PCs to communicate with each other.
At Staples, you can get a switch or a router for the same price. The router will solve all of your problems, the switch will solve one of them - connecting the PCs together.

Perry M Lynch, CISSP CISA
Mac Newbie, Security not-so-newbie
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Clearly there's more than one way to do things. Really my question for deldakota would be about the Verizon DSL modem/router. Is it a single port, or does it have more than one? If the DSL modem/router has more than one port I still suggest using a switch using GigE. For example the Linksys 8 port Switch . They run around $60 to $100 on Amazon. For everyone else, yes a router will do the job, and I'm not here to argue it won't. However in a proper network typology configuration a switch should be used. No need for layers, or the added security. If a router is being used as Router/Gateway, and it offers NAT capability then it would be fine - even with one IP. For more security use a Host based IPS (Intrusion Prevention System) applications such as for PC ZoneAlarm or Blackice. For Mac use the built in Firewall - I'm sure there some other products that will be recommended. Honestly anything more on physical line would just be overkill.

My configuration uses a Cisco PIX 501, and Catalyst 24 Fast Port 2900 series Switch - talk about over kill huh?
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