New To Mac-Forums?

Welcome to our community! Join the discussion today by registering your FREE account. If you have any problems with the registration process, please contact us!

Get your questions answered by community gurus Advice and insight from world-class Apple enthusiasts Exclusive access to members-only contests, giveaways and deals

Join today!

 
Start a Discussion
 

Mac-Forums Brief

Subscribe to Mac-Forums Brief to receive special offers from Mac-Forums partners and sponsors

Join the conversation RSS
Internet, Networking, and Wireless Discussion of networking, internet, and wireless including Apple's Airport products.

Which "G" or "N"?


Post Reply New Thread Subscribe

 
Thread Tools
fixerman

 
fixerman's Avatar
 
Member Since: Nov 08, 2007
Location: London England
Posts: 113
fixerman is on a distinguished road

fixerman is offline
Which wireless standard is fitted to the new iMacs.? If it is "N", is there any problem or advantage using it with my existing Belkin "G" wireless router?
QUOTE Thanks
novicew

 
novicew's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jan 04, 2006
Location: Hamburg, Germany
Posts: 1,385
novicew is a name known to allnovicew is a name known to allnovicew is a name known to allnovicew is a name known to allnovicew is a name known to allnovicew is a name known to allnovicew is a name known to all
Mac Specs: MacBook Pro | iMac(2.1 G5) | MacBook(2.16 C2D) | MacMini (1.67 CD) | iPhone 4 | iPad (3rd Gen)

novicew is offline
New iMacs are fitted with the "n" format (802.11n). That allows you to go up to 248 Mbit/s data rate, where as 802.11g can only transfer 54 Mbit/s. If you have a slow router it would make no difference, connecting a faster computer. The maximum speed you can operate is 54 Mbit/s.
QUOTE Thanks
fixerman

 
fixerman's Avatar
 
Member Since: Nov 08, 2007
Location: London England
Posts: 113
fixerman is on a distinguished road

fixerman is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by novicew View Post
New iMacs are fitted with the "n" format (802.11n). That allows you to go up to 248 Mbit/s data rate, where as 802.11g can only transfer 54 Mbit/s. If you have a slow router it would make no difference, connecting a faster computer. The maximum speed you can operate is 54 Mbit/s.
Thank you for the fast response! Is it worth the difference to replace my old Belkin with an Airport extreme and will it work with the Windows pc on the network?
QUOTE Thanks
novicew

 
novicew's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jan 04, 2006
Location: Hamburg, Germany
Posts: 1,385
novicew is a name known to allnovicew is a name known to allnovicew is a name known to allnovicew is a name known to allnovicew is a name known to allnovicew is a name known to allnovicew is a name known to all
Mac Specs: MacBook Pro | iMac(2.1 G5) | MacBook(2.16 C2D) | MacMini (1.67 CD) | iPhone 4 | iPad (3rd Gen)

novicew is offline
It is worth if you have a super fast DSL connection or a local network where you transfer files quite frequently. Most of the Broadband connections are not fast enough to get the full benefit of "n". In the future this might change though.
QUOTE Thanks
djames42

 
Member Since: Oct 07, 2005
Location: Seattle
Posts: 346
djames42 has a spectacular aura about
Mac Specs: MBP CD 1.83/2ghz/7200 100g + Mini 2ghz C2D 2gb + Mini 1.42ghz G4 + PM 7200/120 + Newton OMP

djames42 is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by novicew View Post
It is worth if you have a super fast DSL connection or a local network where you transfer files quite frequently. Most of the Broadband connections are not fast enough to get the full benefit of "n". In the future this might change though.
Erm, I don't believe that any broadband connection is going to be fast enough to notice the difference. n vs g is not going to affect your WAN speed, but will affect the speed of your LAN.

If you have another computer hardwired to your router, or a computer (or other network appliance) that supports N speeds, then it is worth upgrading if you anticipate transfering files between machines on a regular basis, or streaming video (I rarely have trouble streaming video over G from a computer upstairs to my TV downstairs by way of a Philips Streamium SL-300i, but the video is standard definition and either mpeg2 or divx encoded -- if you want to stream hi-def or DVD quality VOB files, then you'll need N).

If you have one computer connecting wirelessly to your access point which is in turn hardwired to a DSL/Cable connection, then you're unlikely to notice any difference in G vs N. The only exception to that would be signal strength. If you're not getting a full connection to your wireless computer, then upgrading to N could help your speed because a stronger signal will usually give you a faster connection.
QUOTE Thanks

Post Reply New Thread Subscribe


« OS X networking: Amazing! | Wireless Disconnect Problem »
Thread Tools

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Upgrade to "N" speed - Best practice? bence8810 Internet, Networking, and Wireless 4 11-11-2007 05:29 PM
How to: "n" only on AEBS with Express simultaneously Bear Hunter Internet, Networking, and Wireless 0 09-26-2007 08:54 PM
24 hours with 1st Mac (Macbook) Key "G" wont work Cruz777 Switcher Hangout 4 09-05-2007 10:07 PM
Installed "N" adapter in to the Mini dpedini Apple Desktops 4 02-28-2007 10:09 PM

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:35 PM.

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
X

Welcome to Mac-Forums.com

Create your username to jump into the discussion!

New members like you have made this community the ultimate source for your Mac since 2003!


(4 digit year)

Already a member?